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Old 03-06-2012, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Calgary, AB
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Canada is a country of distinct cultural differences between regions. Just wondering, what is unique about where you live now compared to where you used to live (or visit frequently)?

One major difference I have noticed between urban Central Canada and urban Western Canada is motorist/pedestrian interaction. In Montreal for instance the law of the jungle or law of the sea prevails... Smaller avoids larger. Pedestrians avoid cars. In Calgary, pedestrians are some of the gustiest I've ever seen. Pedestrians will step out in front of loaded dump trucks expecting them to stop at the crosswalk... They seem to have the moral imperative in Calgary as well where in Montreal that same person would literally be considered mentally unwell...

What defines your area?
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Old 03-06-2012, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Canada
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I've noticed that motorists in Ontario tailgate more than Montreal or Vancouver motorists. So much so I think it might be that collectively they've decided that the correct following distance is shorter than that agreed upon in most other places.
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Old 03-06-2012, 11:52 PM
 
Location: Derby, Western Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajau View Post
Canada is a country of distinct cultural differences between regions. Just wondering, what is unique about where you live now compared to where you used to live (or visit frequently)?

One major difference I have noticed between urban Central Canada and urban Western Canada is motorist/pedestrian interaction. In Montreal for instance the law of the jungle or law of the sea prevails... Smaller avoids larger. Pedestrians avoid cars. In Calgary, pedestrians are some of the gustiest I've ever seen. Pedestrians will step out in front of loaded dump trucks expecting them to stop at the crosswalk... They seem to have the moral imperative in Calgary as well where in Montreal that same person would literally be considered mentally unwell...

What defines your area?
I was pleasantly surprised when I visited Quebec last year that some car drivers would just stop and let you cross the road, even when there was no crosswalk, they certainly seemed to be a lot more considerate to pedestrians than drivers in Australia.
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Old 03-07-2012, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Calgary, AB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sulkiercupid View Post
I was pleasantly surprised when I visited Quebec last year that some car drivers would just stop and let you cross the road, even when there was no crosswalk, they certainly seemed to be a lot more considerate to pedestrians than drivers in Australia.
Certainly beats Windsor or Toronto where I have actually seen drivers speed up when someone walked onto the street. Of course, Windsor doesn't have a jaywalking ban nor does it even have controlled pedestrian crosswalks.
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Old 03-07-2012, 07:00 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sulkiercupid View Post
I was pleasantly surprised when I visited Quebec last year that some car drivers would just stop and let you cross the road, even when there was no crosswalk, they certainly seemed to be a lot more considerate to pedestrians than drivers in Australia.

Living in Quebec I was somewhat surprised to read this.
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Old 03-07-2012, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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I live on the border between Quebec and Ontario and one thing I have noticed is that left (fast) lane ''hogging'' by driving slowly is much more tolerated in Ontario than in Quebec. Sure, you may get flashed and tailgated in Ontario as well, but not so instantaneously and, umm... as enthusiastically as you will in Quebec.

It appears to be essentially a provincial difference because the most aggressive city behind the wheel (Gatineau) is by far the smaller of the two (compared to Ottawa).
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Old 03-08-2012, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Calgary, AB
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I live on the border between Quebec and Ontario and one thing I have noticed is that left (fast) lane ''hogging'' by driving slowly is much more tolerated in Ontario than in Quebec. Sure, you may get flashed and tailgated in Ontario as well, but not so instantaneously and, umm... as enthusiastically as you will in Quebec.

It appears to be essentially a provincial difference because the most aggressive city behind the wheel (Gatineau) is by far the smaller of the two (compared to Ottawa).
Could also be cultural. Sub-par driving is just less tolerated in Quebec. I don't think it is a coincidence that winter tires are mandatory in Quebec unlike the rest of Canada. Sloppy driving (and left land hogging is sloppy) is just not culturally acceptable in Quebec.

Mind you, in Western Canada you also see less left land hogging even though the culture is more "laid back."
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Old 03-09-2012, 11:38 AM
 
2,289 posts, read 3,934,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ajau View Post
Could also be cultural. Sub-par driving is just less tolerated in Quebec. I don't think it is a coincidence that winter tires are mandatory in Quebec unlike the rest of Canada. Sloppy driving (and left land hogging is sloppy) is just not culturally acceptable in Quebec.

Mind you, in Western Canada you also see less left land hogging even though the culture is more "laid back."
I don't think sloppiness is the right word. Courtesy is generally a non-factor in Quebec. Nobody ever yields without a yield sign (you want to change lanes? you slow down and let me through, then you change lanes. oh, there are 5 cars behind you and you'll never be able to change lanes? too bad, don't care!)

The SAAQ (provincial DMV) actually made ad campaigns on courtesy in the past few years.
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Old 03-09-2012, 10:11 PM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
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Driving in Québec is something that requires nerves of steel.

Check out this cool timelapse video about Montréal (And notice the general lawlessness when driving)

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Old 03-10-2012, 01:38 AM
 
Location: Calgary, AB
482 posts, read 2,159,294 times
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Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
I don't think sloppiness is the right word. Courtesy is generally a non-factor in Quebec. Nobody ever yields without a yield sign (you want to change lanes? you slow down and let me through, then you change lanes. oh, there are 5 cars behind you and you'll never be able to change lanes? too bad, don't care!)

The SAAQ (provincial DMV) actually made ad campaigns on courtesy in the past few years.
Courtesy can be taken too far, after all the point of driving is to get from A to B as quickly and safely as possible. (otherwise a bike would do, no?)

One person's lack of courtesy can be perceived by others as efficient and assertive after all.

Coming from my personal experience, I find that rural Canadian drivers in general tend to dawdle and are on the timid and slow side. Comparing Western and Rural Canadian drivers to the world that is definitely the case. The drive with a certain lack of confidence. Those same folks would consider Central Canada city folks to be "crazy drivers" (their quotes, not mine). I personally enjoy driving in Quebec because the folks there don't waste time and get on with driving. Similarly to Chicago, Detroit, London, Paris, etc.

That of course is seen thru a cultural lens.
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