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Old 03-14-2012, 12:49 PM
 
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Does the US have alot more social issues than Canada when comes to crime , drugs ,addiction , teen pregnancy ,promiscuous youth , school drop out and out-of-Wedlock.

Or are they not that different.

I know the US has more of a gun culture than Canada and a higher homicide rate.Also there more street gang problems in the US than Canada.
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Old 03-14-2012, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
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Sure we have social issues but unlike the USA there is almost no one obsessing about it.
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Old 03-14-2012, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
Does the US have alot more social issues than Canada when comes to crime , drugs ,addiction , teen pregnancy ,promiscuous youth , school drop out and out-of-Wedlock.

Or are they not that different.

I know the US has more of a gun culture than Canada and a higher homicide rate.Also there more street gang problems in the US than Canada.
Stats show that we actually do have significantly lower rates of crime and teen pregnancy and better public school education. Out-of-wedlock child bearing is very common, statistics show a slight majority of Canadian children are born to unmarried parents, but that's because marriage in certain societies, like Quebec, has gone somewhat out of fashion and parents cohabitate and have children while in serious relationships but don't marry, so I wouldn't necessarily quantify it as a social problem. Addiction and promiscuous youth are difficult to quantify, and promiscuity is something of a value judgement, like unwed parents I wouldn't necessarily quantify it as a blight. For the most part, though, I've found that comparing the countries can be tough because what's much more important is regional issues. High School dropout rates in Quebec are high compared to many states, while Massachusets has a lower rate of teen pregnancy than the Canadian average. It comes down to specific subcultures, like Aboriginal peoples, Mormons, rural evangelicals, inner city African Americans etc.

Canada's statistics, in the end, make sense when you understand it as a more heavily urbanized country, with a correspondingly more university educated population (urban centres necessitate this to participate in an urban economy). The culture of the place also has an impact, but i think this is the number one factor.
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Old 03-15-2012, 10:09 AM
 
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We can reinvent the wheel or check this thread out:

Are there less social problems in Canada?

I agree with BIMBAM that regional and cultural differences within a country trump the US vs Canada comparisons on most respects. But if you're trying to explain countrywide differences, poverty drives a lot of those other "problems" (drug addiction, violent crime).

Short explanation: Income inequality is clearly higher in the US, i.e. many more super rich, more rich, relatively smaller middle class, and more poor than in Canada. That last part explains a lot of the social problems.

Other data: Most measures of average per capita income have the US ahead of Canada (source), but median per capita income is very similar (source, see table at the bottom).
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Old 03-15-2012, 11:29 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
We can reinvent the wheel or check this thread out:

Are there less social problems in Canada?

I agree with BIMBAM that regional and cultural differences within a country trump the US vs Canada comparisons on most respects. But if you're trying to explain countrywide differences, poverty drives a lot of those other "problems" (drug addiction, violent crime).

Short explanation: Income inequality is clearly higher in the US, i.e. many more super rich, more rich, relatively smaller middle class, and more poor than in Canada. That last part explains a lot of the social problems.

Other data: Most measures of average per capita income have the US ahead of Canada (source), but median per capita income is very similar (source, see table at the bottom).
Can you elaborate on what is in bold.
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Old 03-15-2012, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
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Average is exactly that, average. You take x values, divide by the total number of values, and you wind up with the number.

Median is just the middle point between the highest and lowest values regardless of count.

If you have a large number or poor, or a large number of super rich, the average is going to be skewed one way or the other. The median is not dependent on quantity.
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Old 03-15-2012, 01:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
Average is exactly that, average. You take x values, divide by the total number of values, and you wind up with the number.

Median is just the middle point between the highest and lowest values regardless of count.

If you have a large number or poor, or a large number of super rich, the average is going to be skewed one way or the other. The median is not dependent on quantity.
no I mean understanding what per capita income means .
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Old 03-15-2012, 06:23 PM
 
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Wink Some serious social issues

In viewing median income consider how they are averaged; the 400 wealthiest Americans have as much wealth as the poorer 150,000,000. Or that half of Americans have a gross income of $33,000 and less.

My understanding that Canada has higher taxes, but in overall consideration possibly lower related to what one receives, such as some measure of public healthcare.

The last time I checked Canada still operated under the rule of law. However the United States no longer does. It should be lost on no one that the basis of that republic, the U.S. Constitution, has been effectively abrogated by the present government. This has been going on for some time, certainly since 2001, but now no secret at all when all branches of government routinely ignore and flaunt the basis of any legal authority they have. Not to mention publicly proclaiming that they can hunt down, disappear, or outright exterminate anyone they want, American citizens included, on their own authority (without need of trail or judicial oversight).

The United States enjoys a bountiful and beautiful land. It still enjoys many strengths, and retains some promise. Not to mention being founded on the highest principles, if maybe some personal hypocrisy. But it is also a troubled empire in decline, no longer a republic, and still largely in denial. That is not a happy recipe.

The biggest problem Canada may have in future is having such a neighbor, whose influence, wholesome and otherwise, has already infiltrated up north in various ways.
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:25 PM
 
18,265 posts, read 10,368,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idunn View Post
In viewing median income consider how they are averaged; the 400 wealthiest Americans have as much wealth as the poorer 150,000,000. Or that half of Americans have a gross income of $33,000 and less.

My understanding that Canada has higher taxes, but in overall consideration possibly lower related to what one receives, such as some measure of public healthcare.

The last time I checked Canada still operated under the rule of law. However the United States no longer does. It should be lost on no one that the basis of that republic, the U.S. Constitution, has been effectively abrogated by the present government. This has been going on for some time, certainly since 2001, but now no secret at all when all branches of government routinely ignore and flaunt the basis of any legal authority they have. Not to mention publicly proclaiming that they can hunt down, disappear, or outright exterminate anyone they want, American citizens included, on their own authority (without need of trail or judicial oversight).

The United States enjoys a bountiful and beautiful land. It still enjoys many strengths, and retains some promise. Not to mention being founded on the highest principles, if maybe some personal hypocrisy. But it is also a troubled empire in decline, no longer a republic, and still largely in denial. That is not a happy recipe.

The biggest problem Canada may have in future is having such a neighbor, whose influence, wholesome and otherwise, has already infiltrated up north in various ways.
Oh boy, did I rep ya for this one. Right on the money.
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Old 03-15-2012, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweat209 View Post
no I mean understanding what per capita income means .
Per capita income is, simplistically, Gross Domestic Product, so all of the goods and services an economy produces, divided by population. Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Per_capita_income
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