U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 03-25-2012, 06:39 PM
 
312 posts, read 945,808 times
Reputation: 151

Advertisements

Why is Kitchener's downtown so small and town like? I was surprised seeing how small the downtown was considering Kitchener is the 10th largest city in Canada and it's also a very wealthy city. How come Kitchener doesn't have a 'real' downtown with taller buildings like many other major cities in Canada?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-26-2012, 12:41 AM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
179 posts, read 662,506 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by ExtremeMan8 View Post
Why is Kitchener's downtown so small and town like? I was surprised seeing how small the downtown was considering Kitchener is the 10th largest city in Canada and it's also a very wealthy city. How come Kitchener doesn't have a 'real' downtown with taller buildings like many other major cities in Canada?
Incorrect. Kitchener is the 10th largest urban area in the country, but the population of the city itself is slightly over 200,000 people. That statistic you posted comes out because the government counts the region as a whole (meaning Waterloo and Cambridge as well as Kitchener) So I believe that's why there isn't a big "downtown" considering it's a small city that gets counted with two other "small cities/towns"

Think of it this way. Vancouver is a city with a population of about 600,000 people or so, but it serves an urban area of about 2.4 million people, and those other 1.8 million people or so are largely dependent on Vancouver for jobs and other things, a lot commute to a "Central area" to work, which is downtown Vancouver, this in the end creates a higher demand for office space, amenities and such, whereas in K-W it might not be the case.

This is just my perception, but I hope it helps!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-28-2012, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,761,439 times
Reputation: 1616
I'm not sure I would describe Kitchener as very wealthy. Waterloo is relatively wealthy but Kitchener is pretty average.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top