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Old 04-29-2012, 10:48 AM
 
9 posts, read 32,256 times
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Hi there thanks for the info
We are waiting for the visa to be sorted. My husbands contract stated the start date would be 21st May subject to visa. I hope it doesn't take longer than that as the wait is kids torture.

We are thinking of buying a car up front but how does motor insurance work over there?
Do you have to pay road tax? Do you pay MOT? How expensive is it to insure a car?

Sorry so many questions but thanks for your advice
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Old 04-29-2012, 12:25 PM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,157,024 times
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No idea about insurance costs in NL.

An MOT is called an "inspection" in Canada - all provinces in Canada have different rules. Some provinces require an annual inspection, some don't require an inspection. It looks to me like you need to do it once in Newfoundland (taxis require an annual) but you could always call them to verify:

Inspection Requirements | Service NL

The "road tax" in NL is basically equivalent to the annual vehicle registration you'll pay for the car's registration in Canada. Registration New Vehicle | Service NL No idea what it costs, but I would bet it is less than the 130 road tax we pay for our car in England.

Also, no TV licence in Canada
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Old 04-29-2012, 12:57 PM
 
1,316 posts, read 2,031,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DHNH View Post
Hi there thanks for the info
We are waiting for the visa to be sorted. My husbands contract stated the start date would be 21st May subject to visa. I hope it doesn't take longer than that as the wait is kids torture.
That's not enough time to get three months in with your American Express card as a resident of the UK, but you may wish to consider setting up an American Express account and putting enough money in it before you go to cover off the charges that you might incur for a few months. Alternatively, you might want to consider leaving some money in an account over there or with a trusted relative to pay off a few months' worth of expenses. Even if you use it for only a few small purchases, paying off your American Express bills in full for three months on a UK issued American Express card and then transferring it over to Canada just might help you to accelerate the process of establishing good Canadian credit. This is just a suggestion.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHNH View Post
We are thinking of buying a car up front but how does motor insurance work over there?
Get abstracts/copies of driving records in the UK (and anywhere else you have lived if practical) for both you and your husband. Get claims history/experience letters from your current and past insurers if possible, again for both you and your husband.

Although they're not likely necessary, do consider getting international driving permits for both of you before you leave the UK. Consult with the AA about same. This should allow you two to drive in Newfoundland without a care in the world on your UK licences until such time as you can exchange same, but do exchange your licences within three months of arrival -- preferably upon or as close as possible to your date of arrival. Provided you meet the very lenient conditions for licence exchange demanded of UK drivers, neither your husband nor you should have to sit a written exam or to take a road test. Your Newfoundland licences will be $100 each and they are valid for five years.

Insurance is pretty simple. They are almost certain to require that you pay in full for your policy at the time it is issued as you have no Canadian credit history. You should expect to pay $1000-1500 per year for the policy if you have no history of moving violations or accidents. Shop around. Doing so can really make a difference. Depending on where your husband is working or his professional affiliations, there may be a special rate available. Look into that. For the sake of our discussion, I am presuming that you will have only one vehicle and that one of you or your husband will be the primary driver on the policy -- the insured person who will most frequently drive the car -- and that the other spouse would be listed as a secondary driver on same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHNH View Post
Do you have to pay road tax? Do you pay MOT? How expensive is it to insure a car?
Annual vehicle registration is $140. Taxes for road maintenance, infrastructure, and myriad other things come out of the petrol that you purchase at the pump. Most of that tax money from the pump gets spent on health care and education, though, as far as I know. Petrol is about 3.88 a gallon in St. John's right now (that's 85 p per litre if you are a metric person).

Annual vehicle inspections are not mandatory, but if you buy a used vehicle, then a Motor Vehicle Safety Inspection Certificate will be required before it can be registered. I cannot stress the following enough -- never make any kind of offer to buy a used vehicle until a mechanic has inspected it, provided you with the results of his/her inspection, and told you whether s/he would issue a Motor Vehicle Safety Inspection Certificate for said vehicle.

At the ten year mark, the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador used to require that vehicles be inspected for safety reasons, but I don't know if that's still the case. Be warned that due to salt air and roads that are heavily salted for five or six months of every year, cars don't tend to last much longer than 10-12 years in Newfoundland.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHNH View Post
Sorry so many questions but thanks for your advice
Finally, if you can get someone on the telephone or by e-mail, then please do follow up with provincial civil servants for up to the minute information or to find out exactly what should be done:

Motor Vehicle Registration Division | Service NL
Drivers and Vehicles | Service NL
Driver Licensing | Service NL
Online Services (eServices) | Service NL
Fee Schedule

Useful guidebooks:

Pocket guidebook published by the Association for New Canadians
An older guidebook published by the Association for New Canadians

Oh, yes, before I go, it used to be recommended practice that you obtain letters of introduction from your bank(s), setting out matters like how long you have done business with said bank(s), what kinds of accounts you hold or have held with them, whether your accounts have ever been overdrawn, whether your accounts have always been maintained in good standing, etc. I don't think that people do this very much any more, but obtaining such letters in the expected format before you leave the UK certainly couldn't hurt matters any. The branch managers of the banks in question used to offer and issue these letters. I don't know if they still do.

Also, be prepared to offer references from previous landlords if you will be arranging leased residential accommodations and you are currently renting or have rented in recent years. Contact information should be sufficient, but a short letter might be even better if you can obtain same easily enough. I have seen the completion of formal reference forms demanded by some landlords in North America, but only on one or two occasions.

Last edited by maclock; 04-29-2012 at 01:18 PM..
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Old 05-28-2012, 04:18 PM
 
396 posts, read 729,556 times
Reputation: 191
The only thing I can tell you is understand for historical and recent economic reasons the city is very irregular. Transit really depends on which street you live on, not just area. I live 6 km from my school but just happen to be able to get to school faster than when I lived just 2km away. You'll find rows of houses that are pretty expensive, directly beside crack dens. You can go to any suburb, and find large portions of the population who behave like hillbillies( because were in large part transplants, from very very rural parts) You'll find some of the richest people in the city behaving very much like the poorest, class division is a work in progress, and somewhat new, as all the bulk of the rich are nouvea rich.

The fact of the matter is, it's a city in transition, it was one of the poorest parts of canada(in north america) 20 years ago, and yet in the recent financial crisis, had it's highest period of growth.
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Old 05-29-2012, 06:09 AM
 
233 posts, read 451,269 times
Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikmaq32 View Post
The only thing I can tell you is understand for historical and recent economic reasons the city is very irregular. Transit really depends on which street you live on, not just area. I live 6 km from my school but just happen to be able to get to school faster than when I lived just 2km away. You'll find rows of houses that are pretty expensive, directly beside crack dens. You can go to any suburb, and find large portions of the population who behave like hillbillies( because were in large part transplants, from very very rural parts) You'll find some of the richest people in the city behaving very much like the poorest, class division is a work in progress, and somewhat new, as all the bulk of the rich are nouvea rich.

The fact of the matter is, it's a city in transition, it was one of the poorest parts of canada(in north america) 20 years ago, and yet in the recent financial crisis, had it's highest period of growth.
Wow you'd make a great spokesperson for the city.
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