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Old 04-15-2012, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,698 posts, read 8,485,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Balducci View Post
"Hoser" came from SCTV's "Bob and Doug McKenzie", eh?
Popularized by them, but I've heard it's depression era slang referring to someone who steals gas by sucking it out with a hose. Can't confirm the accuracy of that however. I've met some prairie people who used the term, perhaps it was also common in Northern Ontario? I always thought Bob and Doug were trying to be like people from Northern Ontario.
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Old 04-16-2012, 01:52 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,216 posts, read 6,570,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Popularized by them, but I've heard it's depression era slang referring to someone who steals gas by sucking it out with a hose. Can't confirm the accuracy of that however. I've met some prairie people who used the term, perhaps it was also common in Northern Ontario? I always thought Bob and Doug were trying to be like people from Northern Ontario.
I've never heard 'hoser' used by people here to describe Canadians in general but I agree it's an old depression era term. As my dad (born in Manitoba in 1906) explained it to me when I was a kid, back then a hoser meant someone untrustworthy and dishonest, generally just not a good person to associate with and could be described as a hoser for a number of reasons - someone who stole gas or was some other kind of thief or moocher, a liar, a cheater at card games, or an inveterate alcoholic or drug user who picked pockets or mooched off other people to support their habit.

Anyone who was the victim of a hoser was described as having been "hosed" by the hoser. The term "s/he got hosed" is still commonly used here by older people who know that it means somebody was victimized by a dishonest person.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 04-16-2012 at 02:20 AM..
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Old 04-16-2012, 02:03 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
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Here's a term that gets used commonly in rural areas here on the west coast. I don't know if it's common in other parts of Canada.

"Fill your boots" - An invitation to dinner guests to take liberties, to eat as much food as they want and pack up some leftover food as a guest plate to take back home with them too.

.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:15 AM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,157,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Here's a term that gets used commonly in rural areas here on the west coast. I don't know if it's common in other parts of Canada.

"Fill your boots" - An invitation to dinner guests to take liberties, to eat as much food as they want and pack up some leftover food as a guest plate to take back home with them too.

.
Yes have heard that in the east as well - but there it is used sarcastically if someone is doing something they shouldn't and you say "Fill your boots!" which basically means "Do whatever you want, I am tired of trying to talk sense into you" LOL
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:08 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
Yes have heard that in the east as well - but there it is used sarcastically if someone is doing something they shouldn't and you say "Fill your boots!" which basically means "Do whatever you want, I am tired of trying to talk sense into you" LOL
Oh yes, it sometimes gets used sarcastically that way here too when somebody is exasperated and fed-up with someone else who is being tiresome, pigheaded and dull-witted. So it still comes back to "having your fill" of a thing or a person .... can be positive as in guesting someone with plenty of food or negative as in too much plenty of a bad thing. I guess you just have to be there to recognize the distinction. LOL.

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Old 04-16-2012, 08:02 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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I'm famliar with 'f**k all' and 'right' in that context. Seems a British/Aussie thing to say.
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Old 04-17-2012, 11:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I'm famliar with 'f**k all' and 'right' in that context. Seems a British/Aussie thing to say.
Seriously? Wonder where it started from if the Brits/Aussies say it too.
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Old 04-17-2012, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Mississippi Delta!
469 posts, read 601,909 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Popularized by them, but I've heard it's depression era slang referring to someone who steals gas by sucking it out with a hose. Can't confirm the accuracy of that however. I've met some prairie people who used the term, perhaps it was also common in Northern Ontario? I always thought Bob and Doug were trying to be like people from Northern Ontario.
According to Wikipedia, Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas started the skits to poke fun at the laws requiring a certain amount of "Canadian Content" in entertainment.
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Old 04-17-2012, 03:19 PM
 
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Prairie oysters - do they eat those outside of Canada?
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Old 04-17-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Sunshine Coast, BC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunshineleith View Post
Prairie oysters - do they eat those outside of Canada?
If they're what I think they are, they're called Rocky Mountain Oysters in the States.

I still won't be eating them!
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