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Old 07-08-2016, 04:40 PM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,007,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Hmm I don't know about that maybe in certain areas. AA's still vastly out number black immigrants from other places. One thing I have noticed is Black folks from other places usually adopt African American culture and speech very quickly.

Black immigrants cluster into certain cities in the US. NYC, Miami, Boston, Hartford and DC are the main centers. Similar to how black immigrants cluster in Toronto and Montreal. And trust me people who move to those cities young lose their accent just as quickly. Trust me most of the Jamaicans I know who moved to Canada young can hardly speak "proper" patois anymore.
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Old 07-08-2016, 06:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
That is quite common in many US cities. I play cricket every Sunday here in Boston. We sometimes mix in with the Indian fellas in the burbs, but in the city its predominantly West Indian blacks. Once a month we make it a family affair, play some Cricket then a massive cookout with the best West Indian food you have had in your life. Football? I run ball twice a week, its a mixed group but there are black folks from around the globe that come out every night.


Black culture in the US is the same as Canada in the sense that its hella diverse. Yeah that diversity is more clustered in certain cities, but it is there. The difference is that in the US you have a strong distinct native black culture that rightfully steps to the forefront. In Canada you do not have that, so black culture is more loosely defined. But as a black immigrant myself I identify as both Jamaican and Black. African Americans along with people of African descent in Canada of backgrounds other than my own are people I view as my "cousins". We share a bond, because our skin colour does bond us together in many ways, despite our cultural differences.
Enjoyed your post for two reasons: had no idea there was a strong enough west indies presence of blacks so as to stimulate a cricket league anywhere in the U.S. I am most grateful for both the existence and now the knowledge of same. Thanks for the info. You've got my mouth watering over that mental picture of the after match cook-out.

Secondly it confirmed to some extent that without the predominant historically "domestic" black culture the others are free to flourish with individual distinctiveness in Canada.
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Old 07-09-2016, 05:06 AM
 
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I think Canadians are about the same as Americans when it comes to bigotry, but there's also a generational factor.

I find that older white Canadians still harbour old prejudices about other white people -- anglophone vs. francophone, Protestant vs. Catholic, born-here vs. immigrants from South or Eastern Europe. Etc.

Younger people take more diversity for granted and are much more comfortable with it. Interracial relationships are much more common now. There are more racially-mixed families. Kids take diversity among their classmates for granted.
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Old 07-09-2016, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Toronto
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Integration in schools is a key component. I grew up as one of the few white kids in a school dominated by other visible minorities. I feel completely at ease being friends with, working with and even married to someone who is a visible minority. They are at ease with me as I am at ease with them. It has to work both ways. For Canada, increased integration is the key to creating a society with less racism and bigotry. That starts in the classroom and at a young age. When kids grow up with and are exposed to different cultures, ethnicities and races it just becomes a way of life for them through all stages of life. They may see that there are differences, but that what we are as humans is ultimately more of a common thread that binds.

Sometimes my husband drives me insane (some of those agitators are cultural) but I've grown to appreciate and love those things about him.

Interesting article on Regent Park here in Toronto

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/29/wo...sion.html?_r=0

Last edited by fusion2; 07-09-2016 at 06:27 AM..
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Old 07-09-2016, 09:03 AM
 
Location: London, UK
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
Integration in schools is a key component. I grew up as one of the few white kids in a school dominated by other visible minorities. I feel completely at ease being friends with, working with and even married to someone who is a visible minority. They are at ease with me as I am at ease with them. It has to work both ways. For Canada, increased integration is the key to creating a society with less racism and bigotry. That starts in the classroom and at a young age. When kids grow up with and are exposed to different cultures, ethnicities and races it just becomes a way of life for them through all stages of life. They may see that there are differences, but that what we are as humans is ultimately more of a common thread that binds.

Sometimes my husband drives me insane (some of those agitators are cultural) but I've grown to appreciate and love those things about him.

Interesting article on Regent Park here in Toronto

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/29/wo...sion.html?_r=0
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa2011 View Post
I think Canadians are about the same as Americans when it comes to bigotry, but there's also a generational factor.

I find that older white Canadians still harbour old prejudices about other white people -- anglophone vs. francophone, Protestant vs. Catholic, born-here vs. immigrants from South or Eastern Europe. Etc.

Younger people take more diversity for granted and are much more comfortable with it. Interracial relationships are much more common now. There are more racially-mixed families. Kids take diversity among their classmates for granted.

Agree 100% with these posts.


The level of racism I find in both countries is the same on balance. Canadians are no more or less accepting of people different than them than Americans. The media reports on the extreme cases, but in day to day life I find people to be for the most part decent and accepting in their own way.


There is a great hope in what I see coming from the not only my generation but the one following. When I go to my daughters elementary school I see how easily the kids interact with each other, but most of all the parents. We don't really care that all of us are different from each other but the more we speak the more we find that there so many things we have in common, despite being from different parts of the planet.


The major issue in both countries though is systemic and institutionalized racism. While people in day to day life will be decent or indifferent to each other, the institutions in place are definitely weighted against people of colour. This manifests itself in the justice and education systems along with the glass ceiling you run up against when it comes to employment and promotional opportunities. Statistics show that this is a problem in both countries and we need to work together to make things better. While people may be accepting of each other in general, they have a difficult time putting themselves in another person's shoes. So open minded, good hearted and natured white folks may mean well, but they have a difficult time seeing all this injustice because it does not happen directly to them. I am not sure how we move past that block, but it is the only way to get better.


Fusion I enjoyed reading the article about Regent, man that place has come a long way. At the same time a lot of us like us who live in very diverse and accepting communities need to remember that all that diversity does not shield us from problems. There are many amongst us that we ignore and harbor resentment, despite living under the false veil of diversity and acceptance.


I think about not only Toronto in that case but the city I live in now, Cambridge. It is held up as an example of diversity gone right, but it still was also the place that produced the marathon bombers who felt like they were alienated from American society. This article really touches on the conflict between the two ends of the spectrum. We love to pat ourselves on the back for living in these places and everyone seemingly getting along, but it is hardly some magic bullet.


http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/05/us...bing-link.html
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Old 07-09-2016, 09:50 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,007,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Enjoyed your post for two reasons: had no idea there was a strong enough west indies presence of blacks so as to stimulate a cricket league anywhere in the U.S. I am most grateful for both the existence and now the knowledge of same. Thanks for the info. You've got my mouth watering over that mental picture of the after match cook-out.

Secondly it confirmed to some extent that without the predominant historically "domestic" black culture the others are free to flourish with individual distinctiveness in Canada.

Respect Brusan. You will find that this is not unique to the area I live either. There are flourishing cricket leagues with strong West Indian representation in places like NYC, South Florida, Connecticut and Western Mass. This is the link to one in my area (http://www.mscl.org/)


The Conway Cricket Club is the team we practice with on Sundays to keep them sharp for their competitions. I do not play for the competitive travel test match team, as my skills are not up to the level of the official club members. Many are former professional or junior players in their home countries. I am more of a footballer anyways, that is where I play with the rec elite teams.


Immigrant black cultures flourishes in both countries. One of the reasons why the US and Canada are major magnets for black immigrants when they are looking to relocate.
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Old 07-09-2016, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,137,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post

Fusion I enjoyed reading the article about Regent, man that place has come a long way. At the same time a lot of us like us who live in very diverse and accepting communities need to remember that all that diversity does not shield us from problems. There are many amongst us that we ignore and harbor resentment, despite living under the false veil of diversity and acceptance.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/05/us...bing-link.html
Yeah Regent park has completely changed. Its a lot more appealing.. My Aunt lived in Regent Park and when I was a kid I used to say to her that her building was ugly and like all the rest of the buildings. As a matter of fact if there wasn't a number on it there'd be no way to distinguish it from the dozens of other ugly brown carbon copy buildings. Its great to see what happened.

As for the rest of what you said we should never be complacent. There is still healing to happen in the city after the TPS carding fiasco. Honestly i'm less concerned about whether the U.S or Canada are 'better' when it comes to race relations. My desire is for real change when it comes to race relations in my city and country. It is far more productive to look in house on ways to improve integration and race relations than to constantly look at how others are not doing well. Sure look to them for the good things they do but more importantly lets look at our own problems and find our own solutions that work best for our own cities and country! This to me is a far more productive approach.
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Old 07-18-2016, 12:59 PM
 
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Hey Urban Luis, apologies for the late reply.

Yes, there is a strong history and it is very vibrant. There is a large community of freed slaves in Nova Scotia:

African Nova Scotian Culture | History | Events | Communities | The Book of Negroes | Tourism Nova Scotia

Across Canada we have immigrants from West Africa, East Africa and the Caribbean.

From an urban experience, I can speak to Toronto, Toronto has a rich Caribbean flavour, that is honestly unique as it is literally part of the cultural fabric of the city. So the answer is yes, there is a Black Canadian culture, and it is alive and vibrant.

As far as the race relations piece, I must admit, I HAVE BEEN victim of bad police experiences in the Greater Toronto Area in my own community. There are definitely issues there that need to be addressed. My friends are constantly harassed, Police culture in Canada is very similar to that of America.
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Old 07-18-2016, 01:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 30_miles View Post
I was born and raised in the Southern part of the USA where it's notorious for having problems with race, particularly colored people. I must say that I never encountered racism until I moved to Toronto, Canada. Funny thing is I mostly encountered racism from Chinese & Indians. I hated living here for years until I met some people that were very open minded.
This is a good point to touch on, definitely some racism amongst the different ethnic communities, which is unfortunate, however, folks in Toronto still live in much more harmony than anything I have seen in the states - I have spent alot of time working in the NYC area, Chicago and Atlanta.
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Old 07-18-2016, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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I think is 100% depends on where in Canada and where in the USA we are talking about. I remember working in a hospital in another part of Canada that was less multicultural and doing an assessment on this elderly white Canadian man. When I told him the heart surgeon that operated on him had asked me to do a follow up assessment on his comments were ... oh you mean that Paki guy. In my head I was like wow ... maybe he should have been on break when you had your heard attack or let you code out you ungrateful piece of work.

I think it can be hit or miss in either Country depending on the location. In general I find Canadians are generally less openly racist. Being visibly fair, but ethnically not white. I accident hear some crazy racist stuff that most visible minorities don't hear because I tend to blend in and people forget and drop comments that are crazy offensive especially when around people that appear to be from the same culture or race as them. One thing I noticed is that no group is much better then the other at this ex all groups do this to other groups. It is not only "white" people that do this.
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