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Old 11-16-2012, 09:53 AM
 
4,218 posts, read 7,849,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psichick View Post
Do you know how long he needs to live there before he can sponsor someone?
Good question. I don't see specifically that the 2 years marriage should be spent in Canada only. People get married in any number of countries, live there, then come back to Canada and start sponsoring. But you won't lose anything by finding an immigration attorney to clarify your specific situation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by psichick View Post
As an American, the 6 months you spoke of, would I need a Visa? Or is that about how long I can stay w/o one? And I'm assuming he needs to be living there full-time too? This may be more complicated than I thought, since he lives here (America).
Generally, anyone in Canada temporarily, needs a visitor visa - except visa-exempt countries, and USA is one of them:

Quote:
United States citizens and permanent residents: You do not need a visa to visit or transit in Canada if you are a United States citizen or a person lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent residence who is in possession of their alien registration card (Green card) or can provide other evidence of permanent residence.
Find out if you need a visa to enter Canada as a visitor

6 months is the maximum limit for any visitor. Americans, obviously, have the advantage of crossing the border back to USA, marking the end of their 6 months, and re-entering Canada again, starting their new 6 months. If it seems pointless, it's still better than staying a year and having problems on the border.
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Old 11-28-2012, 12:09 AM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,435 posts, read 2,811,269 times
Reputation: 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
Good question. I don't see specifically that the 2 years marriage should be spent in Canada only. People get married in any number of countries, live there, then come back to Canada and start sponsoring. But you won't lose anything by finding an immigration attorney to clarify your specific situation.
Thanks. I didn't see anything either, but you never know. I didn't think about finding and immigration attorney. I'll let BF know and see if his regular atty can help us or find us an immigration atty.


Quote:
Generally, anyone in Canada temporarily, needs a visitor visa - except visa-exempt countries, and USA is one of them:

Find out if you need a visa to enter Canada as a visitor

6 months is the maximum limit for any visitor. Americans, obviously, have the advantage of crossing the border back to USA, marking the end of their 6 months, and re-entering Canada again, starting their new 6 months. If it seems pointless, it's still better than staying a year and having problems on the border.
Oh that's too funny. So all I'd have to do is come back to the US for a bit then go back. Thanks again. This helps a lot. Definitely have to sit down and do some planning and more talking about when this should happen. Timing is going to make a difference with my aging parents.
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Old 12-13-2012, 12:36 AM
 
Location: SNA=>PDX 2013
2,435 posts, read 2,811,269 times
Reputation: 2759
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuala View Post
As of 6 days ago as well, (Oct. 25, 2012), you have to be married for 2 years before the Canadian spouse can apply for sponsorship (this is waved if you have kids):
In case anyone reads this. I believe the above is incorrect. You don't have to be married for 2 years to apply for sponsorship. You have to remain married for 2 years after you receive permanent residence assuming you were married less than 2 years to begin with.


Their website says:
Quote:
Effective October 25, 2012, sponsored spouses or partners must now live together in a legitimate relationship with their sponsor for two years from the day they receive permanent residence status in Canada.
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:42 PM
 
4 posts, read 15,419 times
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I hope no one gets frustrated with me for asking this. I've read so much stuff, but I've not been able to find an answer anywhere, and if it's been answered previously in this thread, boy am I going to feel super stupid.

Is it possible to get a work visa and move to Canada with a retail job? I know it's possible to move with a skilled trade, but has anyone ever heard of this happening with, for example, Walmart?

I've read that I have to have a job offer before applying for a work visa. Has anyone heard of retail stores offering jobs to people who need a work visa? Would it be possible to go to Canada "on vacation" with the intent of looking for a job, and eventually moving there? Or is that, you know, illegal?

I am seeing a Canadian and even though we're not that far (I'm in Michigan, he's in northern Ontario) I want to be closer. I've done some reading, and we could get married and I could move in, but I wouldn't be able to work, from what I understand, and I don't want to put that kind of stress on his finances.

I'd really love someone who's been through a similar situation to talk with and ask questions to. It's been difficult trying to figure out things on our own with only the internet to go off of. I'd love to share my email address or something with someone who could offer any kind of advice. I am full of questions.
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:54 AM
 
71 posts, read 131,684 times
Reputation: 70
I need honest opinions/answers from anyone who can help me. My husband (who is Canadian) and I (who is American) have been living apart for a year now and we are getting to a breaking point. The traveling back and forth and paying for two places to live is killing us financially. I have recently lost my job here in the US and am living on a limited income. My husband works in Alberta and wants me to move up to Canada and stay with him while we apply for PR for me. I see that US citizens can visit up to 6 months, but the PR application process takes up to a year or more.

Am I technically allowed to cross the boarder (I have a passport) with my husband and declare that we are applying for PR inside of Canada? I have visited the CIC website and there is an application for married couples to apply from inside of Canada, but I have to provide proof of my status there (work permit, study permit, visitor visa-even though US citizens don't need one). There is one for outside of Canada, but that defeats our purpose financially. He believes I can live with him because we're married, but I am thinking I have to have a legal reason to be there. I don't want to get anyone in trouble and want to do things the right way. I have applied for work in Alberta and even BC, but with no luck. Any opinions/answers/facts are greatly appreciated. If we don't act now, I will officially be homeless in the US.
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Old 01-29-2013, 11:05 AM
 
5 posts, read 11,604 times
Reputation: 10
I think that this belongs into this thread. I was googling some stuff regarding the immigration for some statistics and I found these interesting articles. I hope they'll help.

Census: Newcomers drive population growth

Harper tells Davos that hard choices needed now - Politics - CBC News

Whither Immigration In Canada? | Vancouver BC Real Estate

Jason Kenney to relaunch skilled worker immigration program in May
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Old 02-20-2013, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 223,954 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by psichick View Post
In case anyone reads this. I believe the above is incorrect. You don't have to be married for 2 years to apply for sponsorship. You have to remain married for 2 years after you receive permanent residence assuming you were married less than 2 years to begin with.


Their website says:
you don;t need to be married at all to sponsor someone.
It might help depending on the country the person comes from (that you are sponsoring) but is not a requirement...only a relationship for 12months +
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Old 05-27-2013, 11:29 AM
 
7 posts, read 27,248 times
Reputation: 10
Will a felony from 1960 keep you out of Canada? Do they check everyone for a record?
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Old 06-02-2013, 12:27 PM
 
1 posts, read 10,002 times
Reputation: 10
So I'm in a bit of doozy.
I recently was accepted into Pearson College - UWC located near Victoria, B.C.
This is a private 2 year secondary school in which I get a free full ride, board, etc.

My complication is:

- I'm a citizen of Peoples Republic of China but a permanent resident of the U.S.
- I can apply for a student permit from the U.S. but not from China (i believe)
- I can apply for Visa from China, but will not be able to study.

What do you all think is the best course of action?

Please help! This opportunity is huge for me and I may never get the chance at something like this again. If one could be concise in their answer rather than circumlocutive or overly-didactic, that'd be wonderful. Immigration law is more confusing than Astrobiology.

Thanks in advance!
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Old 06-03-2013, 09:40 AM
 
1,746 posts, read 4,517,015 times
Reputation: 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trumpetman View Post
So I'm in a bit of doozy.
I recently was accepted into Pearson College - UWC located near Victoria, B.C.
This is a private 2 year secondary school in which I get a free full ride, board, etc.

My complication is:

- I'm a citizen of Peoples Republic of China but a permanent resident of the U.S.
- I can apply for a student permit from the U.S. but not from China (i believe)
- I can apply for Visa from China, but will not be able to study.

What do you all think is the best course of action?

Please help! This opportunity is huge for me and I may never get the chance at something like this again. If one could be concise in their answer rather than circumlocutive or overly-didactic, that'd be wonderful. Immigration law is more confusing than Astrobiology.

Thanks in advance!
Where do you live? What's your problem?

If you live in the US, just apply for the student permit at a Canadian consulate in the US, get the study permit and go to Canada for your studies.

Here is the webside you need in order to apply for Canadian student permit:

Get a study permit
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