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Old 05-01-2012, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
179 posts, read 635,921 times
Reputation: 155

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Seeing as there are always questions regarding immigration in virtually every thread, I've decided to create this thread so we can help those wanting to immigrate, or just discuss the immigration policies.

I'll start with a brief summary of recent changes to immigration programmes.


Moderator's Note:
Disclaimer: As with all threads on City-Data, this thread expresses the opinions and experiences of individual members. It is NOT official Canadian Immigration policy. It is NOT legal advice on Canadian Immigration. It should be regarded as personal opinion only. As the views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarliy reflect the official policy or position of any agency of the Canadian government you are advised to contact an immigration lawyer or the Canadian government for all matters concerning immigration. Assumptions made or actions taken based on information or advice given in this thread are entirely voluntary and may have dire consequences. You have been warned.

Here are links to the Canadian Government website:

General Page: English Citizenship and Immigration Canada

General Page: Français Citoyenneté et Immigration Canada

Visiting Canada: Visit Canada

Working in Canada: Work in Canada

Studying in Canada: Study in Canada

Immigrating to Canada: Immigrate to Canada

Refugee Information: Refugees .

Last edited by elnina; 07-18-2014 at 04:41 PM..
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Old 05-01-2012, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
179 posts, read 635,921 times
Reputation: 155
A Summary of Recent Changes to Canadian Immigration
April, 2012

Recent months have seen profound changes to Canadian immigration programs. For those who follow these changes, or whose applications may be affected by them, keeping track of when and how decisions are made and implemented is of the utmost importance. For this reason, CIC News has created a comprehensive list of the large-scale changes that have been made to Canadian immigration programs since January 1, 2012 (with one important addition from December 2011).

While some of changes have already been implemented, many are still in the planning phases and will be put into practice later this year. These changes are presented below in chronological order.

Creation of Parent and Grandparent Super Visa – 1 December 2011

IMPLEMENTED


Beginning in December 2011, parents and grandparents of Canadian citizens and permanent residents may apply for a new ‘super’ visitor visa. This visa allows parents and grandparents to stay in Canada for up to 2 years at a time, and can be renewed for a period of up to 10 years.

Only parents and grandparents, and their spouses, are eligible to receive this visa. In addition to standard temporary resident visa application materials, they must secure approved health insurance for the time period they will stay in Canada.

Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act – 16 February

NOT YET IMPLEMENTED

In an effort to maintain the integrity of Canada’s asylum system, Prime Minister Stephen Harper introduced the Protecting Canada’s Immigration System Act, which acts as an amendment to the 2010 Balanced Refugee Reform Act.

Through this act, refugee claimants from countries that do not traditionally produce refugees will be processed within 45 days. It is hoped that this shortened processing time will more quickly address unfounded claims, and thus save money housing and processing these claimants.

Additional measures have been added to tighten rules regarding human trafficking and helping the victims of trafficking operations who end up in Canada.

Finally, the Act will make mandatory the provision of biometric data for all Temporary Resident Visa applications. This is already mandated by many countries such as the US, Australia, and the EU, and will help to further minimize fraudulent applications.

Temporary Residence Permit Rules Loosened – 27 February

IMPLEMENTED


Canadian law dictates that people who wish to enter Canada but have a past criminal conviction must be either considered rehabilitated or must acquire a Temporary Residence Permit (TRP) before they can enter the country. However, many individuals are not aware of this requirement, often resulting in confusion and frustration at the border.

Effective March 1, individuals who arrive at a Canadian Port of Entry and who require but do not have a TRP may have one issued at the border, with the standard $200 processing fees waived. Applicants must fulfill the following:

• They have only one misdemeanor/summary conviction on their records; and

• They were not imprisoned for their offense

The ultimate decision regarding the issuance of a TRP at the Canadian Port of Entry lies with Canadian Border Services Agency officers. A TRP will be issued in this way only once, and those requiring a TRP who wish to return to Canada at a later date must complete the standard application process and payment of fees.

For a more detailed explanation of this option, please see the article in this month’s edition of CIC News.

Limiting Marriage Fraud in Family Class Sponsorship – 2 March

IMPLEMENTED

Individuals who have come to Canada as the spouse of a Canadian citizen or Permanent Resident must now wait 5 years from the time they are granted Permanent Residency status before they can in turn sponsor a different spouse to come to Canada.

In addition to this new restriction, talks have been held discussing other possible measurements that can be taken to eliminate marriage fraud.

Quebec Skilled Worker Program Overhaul – 20 March

IMPLEMENTED


In December 2011, the Government of Quebec announced that standardized French language tests must be included in all QSW applications. This was the first step in an initiative to overhaul the Quebec Skilled Worker (QSW) program in 2012.

Beginning officially on 20 March, applicants to the QSW program were divided into 3 groups. Group 1, which encompasses seven types of applicant, includes people such as temporary foreign workers residing in Quebec and applicants with areas of training (fields of study) that score 12 or 16 on the Quebec Selection Grid. There are no limits to this type of application.

Group 2 consists of people with areas of training (fields of study) in targeted professions that score 6 points on the Quebec Selection Grid, as well as those pursuing a degree in Quebec or its equivalent outside of the province. This group is limited to 14,300 applicants.

Applicants who do not fall into Groups 1 or 2 are not eligible to apply for Quebec immigration at this time. These changes are effective from 20 March 2012 to 3 March 2013. For a more detailed summary, please see our CIC news article on the subject.

Standardizing the Assessment of Foreign Education Credentials – 28 March

NOT YET IMPLEMENTED


A new requirement has been proposed that will require Federal Skilled Worker applicants to have their education credentials assessed and verified by designated organizations prior to submitting their applications. In this way, it is believed that the number of unqualified applications will be reduced, and those who are accepted to Canada will be able to more easily find jobs in their fields.

To assist in the credential assessment process, on 16 January Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) launched the International Qualification Network (IQN) website. According to CIC, the website will serve “as a virtual space for employers, regulatory bodies, governments and organization s serving immigrants to capitalize on promising qualification assessment and recognition practices”.

Elimination of Federal Skilled Worker Backlog – 30 March

NOT YET IMPLEMENTED


Many Canadian visa offices have been slowed down due to a severe backlog of applications. To address this, on 30 March the Canadian Citizenship and Immigration Minister, Jason Kenney, announced that all files submitted to the Federal Skilled Worker (FSW) Program before 27 February 2008 will be returned without assessment. This will result in the return of approximately 300,000 applications and government processing fees.


Creation of Skilled Trades Category – 10 April

NOT YET IMPLEMENTED


In an effort to better target professionals in much needed skilled trades such as construction and resources management, the government intends to create a new Skilled Trades category within the larger FSW program. Further information on this can be found in this month’s edition of CIC News.

Mandatory Language Testing for Some Provincial Nominees – 11 April

IMPLEMENTED

Provincial Nominee Programs (PNPs) are semi-autonomous immigration programs through which individual provinces are able to select the immigrants they wish to come live and work in their jurisdiction. However, some PNP regulations are still mandated by the Federal government.

Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney stated that moving forward, PNP nominees in semi- and low-skilled occupations will have to undergo mandatory language testing of their English (or French) skills. They will have to meet minimum language standards set by the Federal government if they wish to secure their Provincial Nomination Certificates. Kenney stated that “as a result, immigrants coming to Canada […] will arrive with much better language skills and will be selected for the impact they can have on Canada’s economy”.

Work Requirements Relaxed for Canadian Experience Class – 16 April

NOT YET IMPLEMENTED

Skilled foreign workers seeking Permanent Residency through the Canadian Experience Class (CEC) may have to fulfill less stringent work restrictions to become eligible to apply.

Currently, applicants to CEC’s temporary foreign worker stream must have completed 24 months of full-time work experience within the past 36 months. Regulatory changes have been proposed that will decrease this time requirement to 12 months.

Creation of New Entrepreneur “Start-Up” Visa – 18 April

NOT YET IMPLEMENTED


Minister Kenney announced that the government has begun consultations to discuss the possible creation of a new program for immigrant entrepreneurs who wish to establish new companies in Canada.

This new program is envisioned with a component that would link newcomers with private-sector organizations that can then assist the newcomers in navigating the world of Canadian business. It will be small-scale, with about 2,750 applications received per year, and lasting no more than five years. It is one of many possible changes to Canada’s business class of immigration.

Accelerated LMO Processing Times – 25 April

IMPLEMENTED


Employers who have already received a positive Labour Market Opinion (LMO) for an employee within the past two years may have their future LMO applications expedited. The new program will allow qualified applicants to receive an Opinion within 10 business days of applying.

Employers will still have to fulfill recruitment and hiring requirements in line with traditional LMO applications for the position being offered. Currently, applications in Quebec do not offer the accelerated option. Please read Attorney David Cohen’s blog in this month’s newsletter to learn his views on this new program.

Canada Immigration News - A Summary of Recent Changes to Canadian Immigration
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Old 05-01-2012, 09:33 PM
 
13 posts, read 91,061 times
Reputation: 15
Hi MexiQuebecois, we "spoke" earlier today via my "moving to Montreal" post. Here's another question specific to immigration: It's possible that my Canadian husband and I (American) won't qualify for outland spousal sponsorship, given that we live in South America and our permanent residency here is still pending. If we begin the sponsorship process once we arrive in Montreal, will I be able to stay in Montreal throughout the process? Or will I have to leave Canada after six months (the maximum visiting time allowed Americans) if I haven't yet received permanent residency? Many thanks!
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Old 05-01-2012, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
179 posts, read 635,921 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by taurustheta View Post
Hi MexiQuebecois, we "spoke" earlier today via my "moving to Montreal" post. Here's another question specific to immigration: It's possible that my Canadian husband and I (American) won't qualify for outland spousal sponsorship, given that we live in South America and our permanent residency here is still pending. If we begin the sponsorship process once we arrive in Montreal, will I be able to stay in Montreal throughout the process? Or will I have to leave Canada after six months (the maximum visiting time allowed Americans) if I haven't yet received permanent residency? Many thanks!
That really depends on your status in Uruguay. Do you have a work visa or anything else? it doesn't have to be a permanent resident visa, as long as you have a legal document that allows you to be there for a year.

Yes you can stay in Montreal while the application is in process, after you land, you send your spousal sponsorship application and can then request a change of status, so even if the six months go by, you have "implied status" meaning you're still legally in the country, then you can request a study or work permit, I'm not sure what your plans in Québec are though.

You have to weigh in on the benefits of both processes and make a decision for yourself based on what is more convenient for you.

For inland applications you can stay in Canada and work or study after a few months while you wait for your decision. The disadvantages are that you have no right of appeal, so if something were to happen, you'd have to leave the country and reapply from the USA. You're also required to stay IN Canada while your application is in process, so say goodbye to traveling outside of the country (including short visits to the USA) while the application is in process. Some people do it, but you're risking it, as you can be denied entry at a port of entry and this automatically cancels your application.
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Old 05-02-2012, 08:03 AM
 
13 posts, read 91,061 times
Reputation: 15
Thanks, MexiQuebecois!!
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Old 05-02-2012, 09:16 AM
 
7 posts, read 38,740 times
Reputation: 11
Default Possibly headed for Calgary - and a little lost about immigration

Details:
- My wife is Canadian. She moved down to the states after we met, and we got married in 1999.
- We have 2 kids, son 8, daughter 10.
- She has 3 older kids in Edmonton, all boys, 23, 25, 27. The 27 year old has a 3 year old son.
- We have no serious debt.
- We have 1 car that we'll sell and pay off, and one car that we own and is listed as legal to bring into the country after we fix the switch that controls DRLs.
- We have no legal holds, issues, criminal records.
- We have about $18,000 in the bank we'll use to move and secure a residence. No other money available.
- We have no diseases, fleas, lice, open sores, venereal issues, etc.

So.
- My wife has a job offer at Foothills Hospital in their cardiac group. Pretty good money, just enough to support us all
- I have 25 years experience in information technology, telecom, with my focus being project/program management and business analysis. I am currently billing $55/hr. working for a major American bank. Most of my background is banking, but a data center is a data center. Note: I do not have a degree. Don't ask. Long story.

I have sent 15-20 resumes out without a single reply. This is fairly normal - I have sent thousands of resumes out over the years and only had a handful of answers.

Questions:
- What's the IT market like up there? I know the location is driven by oil the way Charlotte is driven by banking. Good job prospects for a hard working sort like me?
- Anyone else relocate? How did you move your stuff? Anyone use ABF?
- Pets. What's the deal with cats? Every place we look at on rentfaster.ca says no pets. Feline phobias up there? Sheesh.
- Did anyone immigrate and use an immigration service?
- Since my wife has a job offer and can make enough for us all, can I go immediately with her and resume my job search locally, or do I have to wait down here forever?

Any advice or feedback would be greatly appreciated. When she came down here I encountered an enormous amount of stupidity and a frightening lack of information on immigration in the states, and from what I've seen things may not be better heading the other way.

Cheers!
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Old 05-04-2012, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Montreal QC
6 posts, read 37,997 times
Reputation: 14
Try this site!
Welcome to Citizenship and Immigration Canada

I lived in Calgary for 11 yrs, and I can tell you that there are a LOT of places that don't accept cats. I would check craigslist and kijiji. I would also beware of Boardwalk management - this is just a personal opinion but I have had a lot of friends who have had issues getting the security deposit back at the end of their tenancy. The job market is pretty stable from what friends and relatives still living there have told me, and house prices are decent at the moment if you are looking to buy. They can and have gotten ridiculously expensive at at times in recent history.
Your wife is Canadian, so I don't see a huge issue with you moving up here. A family member married a person from NZ who came over on a 6-month visa and had no problems getting a landed immigrant status after the marriage. I hope that the government site is useful!
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:53 PM
 
1 posts, read 28,110 times
Reputation: 10
Default Has immigration to Canada become harder?

Has immigration to Canada become harder the past few years? Has getting a permanent visa for US citizens become harder? (What if you've been living in Canada with family illegally without paperwork for a year now?) if you tell them you've been here for business for a year, will they ask for proof? Also,is there a way/ how can someone in this situation legally start preparing for paperwork and all IF they've already lived in Montreal for a year now illegally.
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Old 05-09-2012, 12:44 AM
 
33,134 posts, read 39,067,107 times
Reputation: 28484
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adventure_Girl View Post
Has immigration to Canada become harder the past few years? Has getting a permanent visa for US citizens become harder? (What if you've been living in Canada with family illegally without paperwork for a year now?) if you tell them you've been here for business for a year, will they ask for proof? Also,is there a way/ how can someone in this situation legally start preparing for paperwork and all IF they've already lived in Montreal for a year now illegally.
The only way to do it is through legal channels found here. =
Welcome to Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Telling the powers that be that you've been working here illegally for the past year will not help your immigration endeavors..
And do read MexiQuebecois link..
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Mexico City (Montreal soon!)
179 posts, read 635,921 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adventure_Girl View Post
Has immigration to Canada become harder the past few years? Has getting a permanent visa for US citizens become harder? (What if you've been living in Canada with family illegally without paperwork for a year now?) if you tell them you've been here for business for a year, will they ask for proof? Also,is there a way/ how can someone in this situation legally start preparing for paperwork and all IF they've already lived in Montreal for a year now illegally.
There's no "Amnesty" in Canada. What are your qualifications? And what do you mean by "family"? Is that a spouse? If you're married to a Canadian then you can access the spousal sponsorship program, though living in Canada illegally will certainly not look good from an Immigration Officer's perspective. So you'll have to start the process from the USA most likely. If you're living with an uncle, brother, etc. then you're out of luck unless you have a set of skills that will open up the path for immigration.
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