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Old 05-11-2012, 03:23 AM
 
159 posts, read 373,516 times
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I was just reading about all the port developments planned for Prince Rupert in BC... and then looked at the city's population of 12k and was like ??? Surely this can't be where Prince Rupert is going to remain? One would expect with Canada's newest premier port being constructed there, that the population is going to explode. What, if anything, has been discussed about this in British Columbia? Or is, for some reason, a boom not predicted?

Beyond the port, there seems to be a lot going on for PR. It's connected to the national highway network, the national railroad network, its located in a beautiful, wild setting, it appears (from Google Earth) to have a good deal of land that could be built on surrounding it (particularly on Digby island, where the local relief looks fairly shallow)... Those all seem like bigtime pluses to me. Yes, it's in the middle of nowhere, but so were -- once upon a time -- Seattle and Vancouver.

Some pics:






Last edited by ShrikeArghast; 05-11-2012 at 03:31 AM..
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Old 05-14-2012, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,593 posts, read 11,077,046 times
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It is REALLY the middle of nowhere. Prince George is over 700km away, and that's still nowhere near "civilization" Also add in some of the worst weather in Canada. Highest amount of rain, and low low sunny days. Over 240 days a year have rain on average.

Yes things will improve from where they are, but realistically, they were about as low as they could get.
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Old 05-16-2012, 10:33 PM
 
Location: BC Canada
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Prince Rupert has been declining in population for decades now. It has lost one third of it's population.
It really is in the middle of no where and it rains constantly. Although it seems like an interesting little city with a storied past the only reason people go to Price Rupert {unless they live there, is to make it to Haida Gwaa.
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Old 05-17-2012, 11:22 AM
 
159 posts, read 373,516 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mooguy View Post
Prince Rupert has been declining in population for decades now. It has lost one third of it's population.
It really is in the middle of no where and it rains constantly. Although it seems like an interesting little city with a storied past the only reason people go to Price Rupert {unless they live there, is to make it to Haida Gwaa.
I guess is just seemed like a place that was on the verge of a boom. I know they had a big fishing bust in the 1990s. But intermodal container ship/rail traffic is such a big, BIG deal these days, and when you read about a city that's doing everything it can to become a premier port in that regard, it raises an eyebrow.
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Old 05-19-2012, 01:11 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Well, I wouldn't mind living there.
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Old 05-19-2012, 08:08 AM
 
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well, to be the next great city, it has to be city first. 12k is hardly a town, but to say a city at present.
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Old 05-19-2012, 10:36 PM
 
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You don't need that many workers to run even a fairly large port anymore. Especially if the port is newly built, it can incorporate quite a lot of automated features which eliminate the need for many of the jobs that used to exist "on the docks" in the past. Instead of humans manually loading or unloading things, the bulk of the work is done by automatic or semiautomatic machine systems.

I take it you haven't visited Prince Rupert yet. As others note, it has been declining in population over the years. The nearest towns are Terrace (the next town of any size on the Yellowhead Highway east of Prince Rupert) and Kitimat (an industrial town south of Terrace), both of which have had sluggish or negative population growth, too. It's a remote region.

The airport is small and would be expensive to expand. Putting people on Digby Island (where the airport is located) would be possible (a study in the mid-90's said that a bridge could be built for around $110 million, as I recall), but there probably isn't a lot of need; the city of Rupert itself has quite a few vacant lots and under-used buildings. Also, if the shipping channel between Rupert and Digby needs to accommodate taller and larger ships, the bridge would become a lot more expensive, especially since it has to meet stringent seismic standards.

Rupert is rainy, and it also isn't very warm. I don't think it has ever gone over 27C any time I've been there in the summer. It gets much warmer inland; Kitimat has apparently hit 40.4.

Anyway, this all reminds me a bit of the Lázaro Cárdenas debate back in the 1990's and earlier. Lázaro Cárdenas is a city and a port on southern Mexico's Pacific coast, and after a series of expansions, it became Mexico's largest port, and is one of the biggest ports in the world by some measures. There were a lot of claims about how expanding the port would create lots more jobs. And that may have been true - but not really for Lázaro Cárdenas itself.

Increasing efficiency and automation reduced the need for human workers, and Lázaro Cárdenas remains a relatively small metro area of under 170,000 people, most of whom don't work at the port (tourism may actually be a larger employer than the port sector). It did bring economic gains to the rest of Mexico, but as a method of creating a need for new residents, ports don't do as much as we'd think.
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