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Old 05-22-2012, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
So to sum it up: all of Canada is Americanized in different ways. Unlike other countries, we aren't so much influenced by "America", the mass media produced commercialized entity, but instead we are influenced by the neighbouring cultures our societies grew up with economically and traded with. To me, I feel like Montreal has alot in common with New York City because they developed at the same time, in the same region, and were each their respective countries primate cities. Likewise, the Gaspe area has more in common with Maine then with New York State despite also being in Quebec. Different things cross the border because of regionalism, so no province is more Americanized than any other. Well, except for Newfoundland, they seem to me to have the least influence out of the provinces because they aren't anywhere near America.
Oh and I should add that I don't think Québécois are the way they are (rambunctious and all) because of American influence... even though they do have that in common with their neighbours to the south.
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Old 05-22-2012, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Well Acajack, I don't think it's easy to say that "culturally" the Newfoundlanders are more American because "culture" is such a big word that encompasses so many things. Lifestyle is a big part of that, and it's possible to be quite similar to your neighbours in one aspect of your culture and different from them in another. One could watch the same television programs but be worlds apart in political attitudes or, say cuisine. I think that's the situation here, Quebec is more "American" in terms of certain aspects of culture, in this case some of the way of life (ie. autocentric cities, type of economy etc) whereas Newfoundland is more Americanized in other ways (TV, movies, books).

We also shouldn't consider, when looking at similarities between Canadian and American jurisdictions, that this is always Americanization. In some cases the similarities are due to Canada influencing its neighbours. These exchanges do go both ways.
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Old 05-22-2012, 09:11 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,397,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Well Acajack, I don't think it's easy to say that "culturally" the Newfoundlanders are more American because "culture" is such a big word that encompasses so many things. Lifestyle is a big part of that, and it's possible to be quite similar to your neighbours in one aspect of your culture and different from them in another. One could watch the same television programs but be worlds apart in political attitudes or, say cuisine. I think that's the situation here, Quebec is more "American" in terms of certain aspects of culture, in this case some of the way of life (ie. autocentric cities, type of economy etc) whereas Newfoundland is more Americanized in other ways (TV, movies, books).

.
So then, much of England is more "American" than, say, many places in Alaska or Hawaii?
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Old 05-22-2012, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Listen, you can make these arguments, but cutting to the chase, are you seriously denying the influence of the United States on Quebec historically and into the present? Come on, I'm not denying Quebec has native culture, but the influence is significant in everything from architectural forms, to music, to foods, to Halloween.
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Old 05-22-2012, 09:35 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Listen, you can make these arguments, but cutting to the chase, are you seriously denying the influence of the United States on Quebec historically and into the present? Come on, I'm not denying Quebec has native culture, but the influence is significant in everything from architectural forms, to music, to foods, to Halloween.
Not at all!


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Old 05-23-2012, 01:55 AM
 
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A Canadian who has lived in the southern USA for 15 years.

Interesting discussion. We have noticed it isn't a difference about Canada vs. USA -- it is north vs. south or east vs. west. Who influenced who? Sure tv is big in the USA and has an impact....but there are things that I identify with as Canadian that we share we some of our most northern USA states, including family. There were many folks who went back and forth and cultures mingled....food, expressions, lifestyles. Who brought who to what...........
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Old 05-24-2012, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Mississippi Delta!
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
And now for something completely different...

Although Quebec is obviously the most "foreign" part of Canada when it comes to the U.S., Québécois actually share some traits with Americans that English-speaking Canadians do not.

For example, most other Canadians tend to be reserved and self-effacing, while Québécois are more rambunctious, boisterous and gregarious. Like Americans.

Québécois are also more cocksure and engaged when it comes to their own culture and identity, and willing to "defend" (loose use of the term) it. Like Americans.

Most other Canadians have at least some level of "culture cringe" when it comes to things typically Canadian, and can be insecure about who they are as a people. Not so for Québécois* and Americans.

*Although Québécois aren't really sure on where they want to go with that, but that's a whole other debate...
I read that Quebec is the most anti-American province, so that would make your observation ironic.
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Old 05-24-2012, 02:59 PM
 
Location: The North
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The thing I have almost always found most striking is how Canadians pretty much include the US in geographic discussions while Americans almost never include Canada. If a Canadian talks about the "South", he's talking about the same states an American would be considering, not the areas bordering the US. If an American talks about the "Northwest", he is almost certainly talking about Washington or Oregon and the "Northeast" would also be US states as well. Every Canadian knows something about most US states but ask an American where is Nova Scotia and over half probably wouldnt have a clue.
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Old 05-24-2012, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Balducci View Post
I read that Quebec is the most anti-American province, so that would make your observation ironic.
Well, that is actually untrue, I'd argue it's the least anti-American province. English Canadians are culturally threatened by the US and have a sort of a passive aggressive attitude towards America and Americans. A combination of an inferiority and superiority complex, coupled with centuries of territorial rivalry in the expansion West, proxy wars, real wars, and fears of invasion mean English Canadians are pre-disposed to look negatively upon the US. It's a way of preserving and asserting independence. French Quebeckers, and to some lesser degree English Quebeckers for complex reasons I'm not going to get into, are more confident of their own identity and so less threatened by America. In my experience, Quebeckers have a great appreciation for, and interest in, the culture of the USA and in particular the North East to which the province has many historic ties. The confusion arises because, as English Canada feels threatened by American culture, French Canada feels threatened by English Canadian culture, in particular by the English language. Americans speak English, but French Quebeckers have nothing against them. At the same time, Quebec is also much farther to the left than any American state and Quebeckers tend to be pacifists (much like modern day English Canadians), so often disagree with US politics. But on the whole, I still feel Quebec is the part of Canada that is least hostile to the US, or at least certainly less than Ontario.
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Old 05-24-2012, 08:44 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,397,138 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Well, that is actually untrue, I'd argue it's the least anti-American province. English Canadians are culturally threatened by the US and have a sort of a passive aggressive attitude towards America and Americans. A combination of an inferiority and superiority complex, coupled with centuries of territorial rivalry in the expansion West, proxy wars, real wars, and fears of invasion mean English Canadians are pre-disposed to look negatively upon the US. It's a way of preserving and asserting independence. French Quebeckers, and to some lesser degree English Quebeckers for complex reasons I'm not going to get into, are more confident of their own identity and so less threatened by America. In my experience, Quebeckers have a great appreciation for, and interest in, the culture of the USA and in particular the North East. The confusion arises because, as English Canada feels threatened by American culture, French Canada feels threatened by English Canadian culture, in particular by the English language. Americans speak English, but French Quebeckers have nothing against them. At the same time, Quebec is also much farther to the left than any American state and Quebeckers tend to be pacifists (much like modern day English Canadians), so often disagree with US politics. But on the whole, I still feel Quebec is the part of Canada that is least hostile to the US, or at least certainly less than Ontario.
Excellent analysis!
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