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Old 05-24-2012, 08:48 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,338,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Willy702 View Post
The thing I have almost always found most striking is how Canadians pretty much include the US in geographic discussions while Americans almost never include Canada. If a Canadian talks about the "South", he's talking about the same states an American would be considering, not the areas bordering the US. If an American talks about the "Northwest", he is almost certainly talking about Washington or Oregon and the "Northeast" would also be US states as well. Every Canadian knows something about most US states but ask an American where is Nova Scotia and over half probably wouldnt have a clue.
This is largely true, but there are variations depending on where you are in Canada. The South in casual conversation in Prince George BC is Vancouver and Victoria. In northern Ontario the south is Toronto, Hamilton, London and Ottawa. In northern and northwestern Quebec (like Abitibi) le Sud (the South) is Montreal, Quebec City and Gatineau.
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Old 05-24-2012, 09:28 PM
 
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When somebody lives in a big city they tend to think of the world as being centered around that city. Folks in Vancouver don't give a hoot what's happening in Battleford Manitoba. But the folks in the small towns like Battleford Manitoba don't have a whole lot of news so they look to the news from Vancouver, Toronto, etc.

It's a little like that in the USA. They don't purposely 'ignore' other countries, they just have so much news to focus on they don't need to report on other news.

I notice when I go back to Canada a separation from the USA. The differences or separation is subtle but it's there. You have to be away from it for a bit to see it.
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Old 05-24-2012, 10:09 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moneill View Post
I notice when I go back to Canada a separation from the USA. The differences or separation is subtle but it's there. You have to be away from it for a bit to see it.
One of the most surreal experiences of my life was staying at a hostel in Vancouver and hearing them talk about a security pact with the US on CBC news. Even though I am American, I felt like I was experiencing the world from the eyes and mind of a Canadian. Even though Vancouver is only 25 miles from America, psychologically speaking, all of Canada feels quite distant from the States. I guess a good analogy would be how San Diego, despite being so close to Mexico physically, feels more connected to New York City than to La Paz or even Tijuana in many ways. In Toronto, what is happening in BC is more relevant than what is happening in Ohio.

Canada also lacks that whole 'freedom and guns' thing going on in America, though I say freedom with quotes because Canada actually feels more free than the States do.
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Old 05-25-2012, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Mississippi Delta!
469 posts, read 602,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
Canada also lacks that whole 'freedom and guns' thing going on in America, though I say freedom with quotes because Canada actually feels more free than the States do.
That depends on what freedoms are important to you.
Thank you, Acajack and BIMBAM, for explaining the mentality of Quebeckers toward Americans. I know they are more left-leaning than most places in America, with the possible exception of the San Francisco Bay Area, and I confues that with anti-Americanism!
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Old 05-25-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,338,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
One of the most surreal experiences of my life was staying at a hostel in Vancouver and hearing them talk about a security pact with the US on CBC news. Even though I am American, I felt like I was experiencing the world from the eyes and mind of a Canadian. Even though Vancouver is only 25 miles from America, psychologically speaking, all of Canada feels quite distant from the States. I guess a good analogy would be how San Diego, despite being so close to Mexico physically, feels more connected to New York City than to La Paz or even Tijuana in many ways. In Toronto, what is happening in BC is more relevant than what is happening in Ohio.

, .
This is both true and not so true. It really depends on what you are expecting to find. If you think it will be exactly like the States, then sure you will find Canada to be different (I suspect this was your expectation). If you expect it to be totally "foreign", even in the way the UK or Australia are "foreign", then you will find Canada very similar to the States.

Going through news stories from past and present, most news-savvy Canadians* would be aware of U.S. stuff like Octomom, JonBenét Ramsay, Casey Anthony, Natalee Holloway, Son of Sam, Chandra Levy, Gary Hart and Donna Rice, Oliver North, the Beltway snipers, Iran-Contra, Al Sharpton, Bernie Madoff, Lizzie Borden, the Unabomber, teachers sleeping with students (LaFave, Letourneau), Rodney King, illegal immigrant and border issues, junk bonds, etc. .... every bit as much if not more than they know about stuff happening in Canada.

And I haven't even touched upon popular culture (TV, movies, books, music), where the familiarity with U.S. is probably even higher than in the news sector.

*the average Québécois being the exception to this rule.
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Old 05-25-2012, 08:26 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,648,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
This is both true and not so true. It really depends on what you are expecting to find. If you think it will be exactly like the States, then sure you will find Canada to be different (I suspect this was your expectation). If you expect it to be totally "foreign", even in the way the UK or Australia are "foreign", then you will find Canada very similar to the States.

Going through news stories from past and present, most news-savvy Canadians* would be aware of U.S. stuff like Octomom, JonBenét Ramsay, Casey Anthony, Natalee Holloway, Son of Sam, Chandra Levy, Gary Hart and Donna Rice, Oliver North, the Beltway snipers, Iran-Contra, Al Sharpton, Bernie Madoff, Lizzie Borden, the Unabomber, teachers sleeping with students (LaFave, Letourneau), Rodney King, illegal immigrant and border issues, junk bonds, etc. .... every bit as much if not more than they know about stuff happening in Canada.

And I haven't even touched upon popular culture (TV, movies, books, music), where the familiarity with U.S. is probably even higher than in the news sector.

*the average Québécois being the exception to this rule.

No doubt Canada consumes a lot of America's pop culture, if not mostly American pop culture --- but I am a person that judges by 'feel' - to me, Canada doesn't 'feel' like a part of the United States, as influenced as it is by it. Does it feel somewhat similar? Of course. But not exactly the same, I can't explain exactly what it is, maybe it's the lack of 'redneck' and 'ghetto' culture (not trying to be racist here, a lot of white people act 'ghetto' and a lot of black people act 'redneck', etc) ? I mean I know Canada has plaid wearing 'hosers' but they're as different from American rednecks as Australian bogans are. Even most urban Americans seem kind of 'redneck' in some ways.

It's more than just that though. I guess it's more the fact that Canada does not view itself as the center of the universe, and that it feels a bit calmer as a place for that reason?
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Old 05-25-2012, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,338,144 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
No doubt Canada consumes a lot of America's pop culture, if not mostly American pop culture --- but I am a person that judges by 'feel' - to me, Canada doesn't 'feel' like a part of the United States, as influenced as it is by it. Does it feel somewhat similar? Of course. But not exactly the same, I can't explain exactly what it is, maybe it's the lack of 'redneck' and 'ghetto' culture (not trying to be racist here, a lot of white people act 'ghetto' and a lot of black people act 'redneck', etc) ? I mean I know Canada has plaid wearing 'hosers' but they're as different from American rednecks as Australian bogans are. Even most urban Americans seem kind of 'redneck' in some ways.

It's more than just that though. I guess it's more the fact that Canada does not view itself as the center of the universe, and that it feels a bit calmer as a place for that reason?
Yeah, there are certain prototypes of humanity that are much less or much more common depending on which side of the border you are on.

For example, I always notice how many more people who look like this there are when I cross over into the States:

DVIDS - Images - Vietnam Veteran Retires from North Dakota National Guard [Image 4 of 4]

Of course, as I said Canada has its own crop of characters as I said, but it's different...
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Old 05-25-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,648,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yeah, there are certain prototypes of humanity that are much less or much more common depending on which side of the border you are on.

For example, I always notice how many more people who look like this there are when I cross over into the States:

DVIDS - Images - Vietnam Veteran Retires from North Dakota National Guard [Image 4 of 4]

Of course, as I said Canada has its own crop of characters as I said, but it's different...
I guess that's really what I mean. Like, the pop culture of Canada is extremely similar I'm not gonna lie, though I would argue that there are some distinctly Canadian artists such as someone like Lights or Celine Dion.

I guess just the extreme nationalism that's embedded so deeply into America, and yeah the fact you have a large number of people who look like Hulk Hogan , that is just sorta absent in Canada. Now on the other hand, I find the vibe in Canada very similar to cities on the West Coast, which in my opinion, elude a more generic less 'concentrated' kinda Americana to begin with as opposed to the South or Midwest.

Another difference too is the lack of certain ethnic groups, such as Hispanics and African Americans (yes Canada has black people but they are different).
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Old 05-29-2012, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Mississippi Delta!
469 posts, read 602,008 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yeah, there are certain prototypes of humanity that are much less or much more common depending on which side of the border you are on.

For example, I always notice how many more people who look like this there are when I cross over into the States:

DVIDS - Images - Vietnam Veteran Retires from North Dakota National Guard [Image 4 of 4]

Of course, as I said Canada has its own crop of characters as I said, but it's different...

Canada doesn't have veterans who are also bikers?
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Old 05-29-2012, 04:12 PM
 
3,060 posts, read 7,157,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Balducci View Post
Canada doesn't have veterans who are also bikers?
Yes - but they don't tend to have that distinctively American biker look

http://rhianonbader.files.wordpress....-web.jpg?w=720
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