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Old 05-19-2012, 01:05 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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What part of Canada do you feel has the most similarity to the United States and the least strong Canadian identity?

I would probably say Windsor, Ontario since it's so tied to Detroit and even has a lot of the same TV and radio stations.
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Old 05-21-2012, 04:57 AM
 
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Pretty much every region of canada east of quebec and south of the territories.
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Old 05-21-2012, 05:55 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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The GTA, Windsor and Vancouver. I've met quite a few people from Canada and those from those cities seem to have the least distinctively Canadian accents compared to those from other regions.
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Imho opinion it would be the prairies.
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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It's not an easy question to answer.

The obvious choices are border cities in southern Ontario like Windsor and Niagara Falls where you really feel the U.S.'s presence.

But then again, almost every part of Canada has similarities to neighbouring parts of the U.S.

Vancouver has the Cascadia thing with WA and OR.

The Prairies are quite similar to the Great Plains.

Ontario we have already discussed somewhat.

Quebec - I will get to in another post.

Atlantic Canada has many similarities with New England.
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:53 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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And now for something completely different...

Although Quebec is obviously the most "foreign" part of Canada when it comes to the U.S., Québécois actually share some traits with Americans that English-speaking Canadians do not.

For example, most other Canadians tend to be reserved and self-effacing, while Québécois are more rambunctious, boisterous and gregarious. Like Americans.

Québécois are also more cocksure and engaged when it comes to their own culture and identity, and willing to "defend" (loose use of the term) it. Like Americans.

Most other Canadians have at least some level of "culture cringe" when it comes to things typically Canadian, and can be insecure about who they are as a people. Not so for Québécois* and Americans.

*Although Québécois aren't really sure on where they want to go with that, but that's a whole other debate...
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Old 05-22-2012, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Canada
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So to sum it up: all of Canada is Americanized in different ways. Unlike other countries, we aren't so much influenced by "America", the mass media produced commercialized entity, but instead we are influenced by the neighbouring cultures our societies grew up with economically and traded with. To me, I feel like Montreal has alot in common with New York City because they developed at the same time, in the same region, and were each their respective countries primate cities. Likewise, the Gaspe area has more in common with Maine then with New York State despite also being in Quebec. Different things cross the border because of regionalism, so no province is more Americanized than any other. Well, except for Newfoundland, they seem to me to have the least influence out of the provinces because they aren't anywhere near America.
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
... and were each their respective countries primate cities. [Emphasis added.]
Surely you meant to type "primary cities", BIMBAM. Then again, maybe you didn't. ;-)
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Canada
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You're right, after further reading up on the human geographical definition of a primate city, I realize neither qualified and were instead better defined as primary cities. Being a primate city means their can't be any close rivals in the urban hierarchy, like how Mexico City, Paris and Buenos Aries dominate in their countries. That was never the case in Canada or the US. Chicago was, and still is, too close, and with the growth of LA it's assured New York will never be primate. In Canada, Quebec City and later Toronto were too close for Montreal to become one. Maybe Toronto will become one in Canada some day, but so far it looks like there's too many strong Canadian rivals for that to really happen.
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Old 05-22-2012, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,320,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
So to sum it up: all of Canada is Americanized in different ways. Unlike other countries, we aren't so much influenced by "America", the mass media produced commercialized entity, but instead we are influenced by the neighbouring cultures our societies grew up with economically and traded with. To me, I feel like Montreal has alot in common with New York City because they developed at the same time, in the same region, and were each their respective countries primate cities. Likewise, the Gaspe area has more in common with Maine then with New York State despite also being in Quebec. Different things cross the border because of regionalism, so no province is more Americanized than any other. Well, except for Newfoundland, they seem to me to have the least influence out of the provinces because they aren't anywhere near America.
Newfoundland is the most different province from the U.S. in terms of lifestyle for sure, but culturally speaking it is more similar to the U.S. than Quebec is.

I find the border areas of Quebec and U.S. states (NY, VT, NH, ME) to be the ones where there is the least cross-border pollination. In spite of the New Engladish architectural feel of many of the towns in Quebec's Eastern Townships, it really does feel like two foreign countries when you cross the border there, obviously because of the language and all that that entails. Perhaps if the townships had remained more predominantly anglo there would be less of a striking difference.
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