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Old 05-19-2012, 03:17 PM
 
686 posts, read 959,639 times
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Damn, I'd love to move to Canada but its almost impossible.
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Old 05-19-2012, 03:59 PM
 
13 posts, read 48,976 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mintgum84 View Post
Damn, I'd love to move to Canada but its almost impossible.
It's really not that hard.. that depends on where in Canada.
The easiest way is to study there, get an after graduation work visa and after a period of time(depends on the province) apply to permanent residency.
It's the fastest, easiest and safest way- but it's expensive.
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Old 05-19-2012, 04:07 PM
 
686 posts, read 959,639 times
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I already have 2 degrees. Left PhD 14 months in, still BA and MA to my credit.

I want to live in a smallish town, maybe 150k pop.
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Old 05-19-2012, 04:46 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,654,464 times
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Nah, IMO it wouldnt really be Canada if it didn't have a low population.
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Old 05-19-2012, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
10,910 posts, read 23,213,925 times
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100 Million people in Canada is the tipping point where we would become a world player on the big stage..We would be literally a Energy Super power in every sense of the term... In line to be on par with the energy and economic influence of Russia and we could then have major control over what happens to the offshore Arctic Oil and Gas Reserves off the Canadian Coast...

The term energy superpower is a term mainly used by media and politicians to refer to a nation that supplies large amounts of energy resources (crude oil, natural gas, coal, uranium, etc.) to a significant number of other states, and therefore has the potential to influence world markets to gain a political or economic advantage. However, it does not have a clear definition. The term is usually used to refer to Russia, but has been used also to refer to other countries, such as Saudi Arabia, Canada, Australia, and Iran.

Energy superpower status might be exercised, for example, by significantly influencing the price on global markets, or by withholding supplies. The status of "energy superpower" should not be confused with that of "superpower".

source: Energy superpower - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-20-2012, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,696 posts, read 6,551,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
the thing is, almost everyone single country in the world is crowded by "Canadian standards", isn't it? When population grows, people adapt to it and "Canadian standards" evolve. The process from 34m to 100m takes 88 years according to the author, by then those Canadians are vastly different from current Canadians. People are not exactly static. 30 years ago, very few Torontonians live in highrise condos, look at now.

It is completely fine to like rural areas more than cities. When Canada has 100M people, I am 100% sure there is still a LOT of rural areas with dirt and gavel roads where you can walk for miles without meeting a single soul. Move away from any major metro area and I am certain you still can enjoy the countryside, just like you do in Germany or the Netherlands, maybe not the same area as you go to now, but they will be still plenty.
Well, it is Canada we are talking about so that would be the standard that counts wrt this thread. The point I addressed was that Germany, when not viewed from a train, isn't the uncrowded place you think it is. It is very crowded. What Germany doesn't have, and what we do have, is suburban sprawl. And with so many in the cities wanting some of the benefits of both the country and the city and moving into ever more suburbs, a huge increase in the population would not result in a walkable city, but rather a huge mass of ugliness spilling out over the land as I doubt very much that the mindset of people wrt wanting the big houses and the big yards would change that much, even over 80 plus years.

And I agree with those posters who point out that this huge increase in population would not be equally spread out across the country, but be limited to the 100 miles of the US border strip, and also limited to the same cities already popular with immigrants.

For some reason I'm reminded of something I read that Brezhnev said to Nixon about the Grand Canyon - I can't remember the quote exactly, but during an aerial tour of the Grand Canyon, I believe Brezhnev said something about it being a pity that it was so barren.

I read the article and it strikes me as a very eastern Canada/city way of thinking - that someone out east is thinking that we would all be happy to have big cities, and all those large spaces are somehow 'barren' and needing to be filled with more cities.

Western ideas of space are different than eastern Canada ideas of space. Southern Ontario, to many western eyes, looks pretty crowded by western standards.

I am not against more immigration, nor am I against many of the things that pass for progress. But I don't find big cities particularly attractive - more like a blight on the land.
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Old 05-20-2012, 02:25 AM
 
4,454 posts, read 5,754,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
The G/M features this article yesterday What would a Canada of 100 million feel like? More comfortable, better served, better defended - The Globe and Mail

I personally like the idea and agree that "Canada is a victim of underpopulation". Canada is probably the most under-valued country in the world and its potential can be immense under the right policy.

While many might argue Canada is too cold and too much land is inhabitable, the author pointed out that if the currently inhabited narrow strip along the border has the same density as the UK in general, Canada's population won't be 34 million, or 100 million, but rather 400 million, which is more than the United States. Do we consider the UK an extremely congested country? No.

Don't get me wrong, I don't want a crowded Canada fighting for resources and space like the most part of Asia, but reasonably higher density brings prosperity, new ideas and opportunities. The fact is, many parts of livable Canada is too sparse. Take Southern Ontario for example. It has a population of 12M and a land of 14000km. If Southern Ontario has the same density of Germany, a fantastic country, it should have 32M people. If it had the same density as the UK, the population would be 36M, or the population of California.

Imagine a Canada with 100M population, Toronto would have 7-8 million as London/NYC does, and the entire GTA would have close to 18 million. Don't be scared by the numbers as Canadians are not used to. The huge land and rich natural resources can handle it perfect well. Second tier cities such as Calgary, Edmonton, Ottawa current with about 1m would probably have the same size of Toronto now and can compete with peers like Chicago and Houston. Montreal will have the same size of Los Angeles/Berlin.

Don't worry about our wonderful farmland and vineyard. There will still be plenty of them for sure. When you take the train in rural UK and Germany, did you ever think: wow, it is so crowded and there is no land and nature? Not at all.

I am sure many will be frowning and saying something like: thank you very much. We don't need that many people, and I just like Canada as it is now. Well, we can think that way - no change. But the truth is, change for the better is good. Canada with 3 times the population will create immense opportunity yet not sacrificing much of the life quality we enjoy now (think Germany again).

Canada with 100M people will be able to create a lot more Canadian culture offerings that is distinct from the rest of the world and especially the US;
Canada with 100M people will provide room for small business to thrive, who have limited room due to the lack of customers;
Canada with 100M people will provide significantly more opportunities in terms of jobs for our young, the most skilled don't need to head south for the future;
Canada with 100M people will be blessed with the taxbase to build far more superior infrastructure which is lacking now - Toronto looks congested in subways and highways not because there are too many people, but due to the insufficient infrastructure.
Canada with 100M people will no longer rely on the US market to sell most of our products because we have a huge domestic market to sell to.
Australia has an similar population as Canada and it would take an very very long time for this country to ever get 100 million and it would reach that after my lifetime.

Australia like Canada are major exporters of natural resources such as energy supplies and minerals and its mining industries are among the most important. If both Australia and Canada had 100 million people then the mining industries would not be so prominent and would much more depend on imports.

There have been countries that have been major energy exporters in the past such as Indonesia which was an major exporter of oil but due to its enormous population it is no longer an oil exporter and has to import it.
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Old 05-20-2012, 09:50 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,292,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by I'm a Weirdo View Post
500 years ago there were around 450 million people in the world. The world is overpopulated today, especially China and India.. I guess America is overpopulated too. Canada's population is fine, the problem is the birth rate.
China's overall population density is only half of the UK and Germany. China's problem is most population congregates in the eastern and southern provinces, which makes large cities over crowded.

America is in no way near overpopulated to be honest. Even the island of Manhattan has only 1.5M residents. California has a population of 36M, if not for water shortage reason, it can easily accommodate another 36M, or more and it still won't be overpopulated. If the US is overpopulated, then there is hardly anywhere on the earth that it is not.

Canada's population is half of France, which is usually considered a low density country. It is definitely underpopulated.

Of course what is the idea population is subjective. But from an economic perspective, Canada's small population actually negatively affect its prosperity and life quality.
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Old 05-20-2012, 10:17 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,292,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
Well, it is Canada we are talking about so that would be the standard that counts wrt this thread. The point I addressed was that Germany, when not viewed from a train, isn't the uncrowded place you think it is. It is very crowded. What Germany doesn't have, and what we do have, is suburban sprawl. And with so many in the cities wanting some of the benefits of both the country and the city and moving into ever more suburbs, a huge increase in the population would not result in a walkable city, but rather a huge mass of ugliness spilling out over the land as I doubt very much that the mindset of people wrt wanting the big houses and the big yards would change that much, even over 80 plus years.

And I agree with those posters who point out that this huge increase in population would not be equally spread out across the country, but be limited to the 100 miles of the US border strip, and also limited to the same cities already popular with immigrants.

For some reason I'm reminded of something I read that Brezhnev said to Nixon about the Grand Canyon - I can't remember the quote exactly, but during an aerial tour of the Grand Canyon, I believe Brezhnev said something about it being a pity that it was so barren.

I read the article and it strikes me as a very eastern Canada/city way of thinking - that someone out east is thinking that we would all be happy to have big cities, and all those large spaces are somehow 'barren' and needing to be filled with more cities.
Yes we are talking about Canada, but that doesn't mean Canada's present density is just perfect, or the majority of our people don't prefer larger population and more economic activities. It is like Toronto is warm in winter by "Canadian standards", that doesn't mean Toronto at -20C in January isn't uncomfortably cold, or most people don't prefer it to be 30C warmer in January.

I agree with you though about the suburban sprawl. If Canada has 100M people, let more cities prosper, instead of creating new Bramptons and Scarboroughs.

As to Southern Ontario, I don't consider it crowded. GTA itself is so sparsely population and can easy hold twice as many people, not to mention London, Hamilton, Windsor, Kitchener etc probably should be 4-5 times bigger.
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Old 05-20-2012, 01:30 PM
 
254 posts, read 429,054 times
Reputation: 229
Open your doors to immigration from Western Europe and a little from Eastern Asia. Only lightly for Africa and the Middle East, taking only the best educated.
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