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Old 06-07-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Maryland about 20 miles NW of DC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ExtremeMan8 View Post
Western Canada is the Prairies. So Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and BC. As well as part of the territories of course. When I think of Ontario in general, I would never think of Western Canada, I would think of Eastern Canada. I always found that the Prairies were what Western Canada was best described as.


I agree but argue that both British Columbia and Quebec are worlds unto themselves. The vibe in Van is very different than the provinces east of the continental divide. Ontario is large enough to be Canada's heartland all by itself and spans the US from New York state to Minnesota.
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Old 06-07-2012, 09:39 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwruckman View Post
I agree but argue that both British Columbia and Quebec are worlds unto themselves. The vibe in Van is very different than the provinces east of the continental divide. Ontario is large enough to be Canada's heartland all by itself and spans the US from New York state to Minnesota.
Would you say BC feels more American than the rest of Canada?
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Old 06-07-2012, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwruckman View Post
I agree but argue that both British Columbia and Quebec are worlds unto themselves. The vibe in Van is very different than the provinces east of the continental divide. Ontario is large enough to be Canada's heartland all by itself and spans the US from New York state to Minnesota.
I'd agree that the lower mainland is very different than the rest of the west, but the interior (and probably the more northerly coastal areas) fit pretty well into the concept of Western Canada.
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Old 06-07-2012, 11:19 PM
 
Location: Maryland about 20 miles NW of DC
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Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
Would you say BC feels more American than the rest of Canada?

Before we came to our senses and fixed the western border in North America at tge 49th parallel the United States and Britain both claimed all of what we called Oregon Territory. Americans had Presidential campaign based on the slogan of 54' 40" or fight which meant we claimed all the territory up to the Russian land called Alaska. There were American and British (Hudson's Bay Co trading posts from the Willamette Valley up to Vancouver Island ). In 1848 we agreed to split the Oregon land down the middle at the 49 th parallel and a third British American war was thwarted.
Vancouver had more connections with the new US settlements and Canada does not have an easy pass through the Rocky Mts so there was real fear BC would become so attached to the USA that it would chose to join the Union to the South and of course the US could help it along just like we did in Texas and California which also were someone elses territory! Hence the urgency in building a trans-Canada railroad which are the CN and CP Railroads.
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Old 06-08-2012, 11:59 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwruckman View Post
Before we came to our senses and fixed the western border in North America at tge 49th parallel the United States and Britain both claimed all of what we called Oregon Territory. Americans had Presidential campaign based on the slogan of 54' 40" or fight which meant we claimed all the territory up to the Russian land called Alaska. There were American and British (Hudson's Bay Co trading posts from the Willamette Valley up to Vancouver Island ). In 1848 we agreed to split the Oregon land down the middle at the 49 th parallel and a third British American war was thwarted.
Vancouver had more connections with the new US settlements and Canada does not have an easy pass through the Rocky Mts so there was real fear BC would become so attached to the USA that it would chose to join the Union to the South and of course the US could help it along just like we did in Texas and California which also were someone elses territory! Hence the urgency in building a trans-Canada railroad which are the CN and CP Railroads.

Oh yeah, I've heard about that, yeah I think BC has always been more integrated with Oregon and Washington than Ontario is with New York State, Michigan etc. Though it's definitely declining somewhat because any Oregonian/Washington who's basically made any kind of mistake in life can't even visit BC now.
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Old 06-13-2012, 08:26 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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The geographic centre of Canada is likely in northern Manitoba.
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Old 06-13-2012, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
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Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
The geographic centre of Canada is likely in northern Manitoba.
It's near Baker Lake, Nunavut
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Old 06-14-2012, 12:53 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Originally Posted by Stubblejumper View Post
It's near Baker Lake, Nunavut
That depends how you measure it. My definition of Canada's geographic centre would be when 50% of Canada's landmass is west/north/east/south of that point. I have looked at a map and moved all the little arctic islands, pretty sure it would be in Manitoba by that measure though you're right there are lots of ways to measure it.
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Old 06-14-2012, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
That depends how you measure it. My definition of Canada's geographic centre would be when 50% of Canada's landmass is west/north/east/south of that point. I have looked at a map and moved all the little arctic islands, pretty sure it would be in Manitoba by that measure though you're right there are lots of ways to measure it.
The longitudinal centre of Canada is near Landmark, Manitoba.
Longitudinal Center of Canada - Geographical Centers on Waymarking.com
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Old 06-14-2012, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Kowaniec, Nowy Targ, Podhale. 666 m n.p.m.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
The longitudinal centre of Canada is near Landmark, Manitoba.
Longitudinal Center of Canada - Geographical Centers on Waymarking.com
The longtitudinal centre of Canada is a line that crosses the country from south to north along the 96th degree, 48th minute and 35th second West. The westernmost tip of Axel Heiberg Island would also be at the longtitudinal centre of Canada. The reason they placed that sign there, is because at that location Canada Highway 1 passes this line of longtitude.

At the latitude of Canada Highway 1 (between 49 and 50N), the country stretches from around 54 west to 126 west. This is about 72 degrees of longtitude, and it would place the logtitudinal centre of Canada at the latitud of the Trans-Canada road just outside (west) of Thunder Bay, Ontario. Southern Canada just has more landmass in the east, and Northern Canada has more in the west. Canada 1 skirts the US border for most of it's way though...
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