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Old 05-31-2012, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psulions2007 View Post
I bolded the second part of that requirement because that says a lot even though it doesn't sound like much.

Who would qualify for a temporary authorization to receive instruction in English? I would imagine only temporary/exchange students from English speaking countries would, while all others would have to go to the Francophone schools to experience the full Québécois culture.

Of course, the ministry being under a Liberal government may allow others to go to English schools, while a PQ ministry may only allow what I said above.
Most kids who get the temporary authorization are the children of temporary foreign workers from English-speaking countries. People who are here for a few years and are not "immigrating".

I suppose that kids on exchange programs might be eligible too but this would be fairly rare since most kids on English-language programs around the world who want to do an exchange probably don't think of Quebec as THE place to do their "immersion" exchange. (Even though I guess that with an English-speaking family in a Montreal suburb like Beaconsfield it is entirely possible.)

Most foreign students who come to Quebec for language immersion come for French, so for them none of this is an issue.
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Old 06-01-2012, 03:20 AM
 
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Default Thanks for the input

Firstly, thanks very much for all your input. I should perhaps clarify a few points:

As someone mentioned, why go to an English school if she is coming to Quebec: well, although she has had three years of school French here in Germany, we were told that her level may not be up to scratch. The alternative that was suggested was to go to an English school and live with a French speaking family. This way she could continue with her schooling and have the French experience with the family and outdoors.

Concerning the legality of the whole thing: we are working with an organization that does these types of exchange programmes and they are pretty relaxed about the whole thing. They haven't even once mentioned that we need permission. Actually we spoke to three companies here and they all offer the programme. I am assuming that through past experience they know how to get permission.

Once again, thanks for the input.
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Old 06-01-2012, 10:38 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Promeet View Post
The option that has been offered by the exchange company with whom we are working is to go to Quebec City. Most of what I have read says that QC has no English public schools for people other than Canadians from English speaking parts of the country - we are from Germany!!

Does anyone know of English public schools in QC of good repute? Is there somewhere where I could get more information on them and see their rankings
English high schools in Quebec City are part of the Central Quebec School Board.

There are 3 English high schools in Quebec City: St. Patrick's HS, Quebec HS (QHS) and Dollard-des-Ormeaux. Not sure about their reputation among QC's English-speaking population, but among the general population they're perceived as being "average", i.e. better than some French public schools but much lesser than others, and lesser than all French private schools. That said, school rankings aren't such a big deal in QC except when talking about college applications.

Of those 3 schools, the first 2 are close to each other and close to downtown, at both ends of the Montcalm neighborhood. I believe St. Patrick's used to be a Catholic school but that changed a long time ago. I wouldn't really know how to differentiate the two, to be honest. The 3rd school is in Courcelette, a tiny northwestern suburb that is right next to the Valcartier CFB, so the school likely draws overwhelmingly among military families and maybe a bit from neighboring Shannon, which is Quebec City's historically English outer suburb. If you're looking for a life experience for your daughter, I probably wouldn't be looking for that one.
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Old 01-18-2013, 10:00 AM
 
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I have a question...My daughter was born in the United States. She is residing with her mother and STEP father in Quebec. Her mother is under the impression that our daughter will be able to go to an English speaking school because the Step father went to an English speaking school. Is this possible or will she have to go to a French speaking school?
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Old 01-18-2013, 10:56 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
No, when I went to English public school in Quebec there were numerous kids form non-English speaking countries who had special permission because their parents worked for a foreign company Quebec wanted in the province or had diplomatic connections. They actually give them out pretty liberally in their sweet heart deals to encourage companies to come here.



No, the requirement is just that one of your parents has to have received the majority of their education in English, in Canada. The child doesn't have to be Canadian born, nor Quebec born, and the parent can be from anywhere in Canada.

What if neither parent went to a Canadian school? But a step parent did? Does the step parent count?
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Old 01-18-2013, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JJH31 View Post
What if neither parent went to a Canadian school? But a step parent did? Does the step parent count?
I don't think a step parent counts unless he or she has adopted the child and becomes officially the "father" or the "mother", or at least the legal guardian. That's my reading of the law but it would be wise to ask a school board or the ministry of education to get a more solid answer.
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Old 01-18-2013, 01:33 PM
 
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I just sent an email to them. I am waiting to hear back. Thank you for your very useful information. Hopeful it will help my fiance.
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Old 06-07-2013, 07:53 PM
 
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Under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, children who have attended English schools anywhere in Canada, as well as their siblings, have the right to attend English schools in Québec.

Even as a newly landed immigrant, you could put one of your kids in English school in Ontario for a short period of time then move to Quebec and they must accept ALL of your children into the English school board.
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Old 06-08-2013, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Montreal > Quebec > Canada
476 posts, read 426,150 times
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One thing you should know: Anglophones in Quebec City represent such a small % of the total population of the city that most of them have assimilated into the French majority over time, to the point that most hallway or schoolyard conversations will be held in French even though the school is officially English.

This is actually quite frequent outside of the traditionally Anglo areas of Quebec.
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Old 06-08-2013, 08:32 AM
 
2,288 posts, read 3,931,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by begratto View Post
One thing you should know: Anglophones in Quebec City represent such a small % of the total population of the city that most of them have assimilated into the French majority over time, to the point that most hallway or schoolyard conversations will be held in French even though the school is officially English.

This is actually quite frequent outside of the traditionally Anglo areas of Quebec.
That's true. In that respect, it's similar to French schools in Toronto.
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