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Old 01-31-2013, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,187 posts, read 1,760,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellemint View Post
Yes, that is noticeably different.

Either Americans are more patriotic than Canadians or American society encourages display of patriotism---but yes, there's a noticeable difference.
I've noticed that Canadians often use flags, but that they do not hold their Maple Leaf flag in the regard that Americans do for the Stars and Stripes.

There are times when the Canadian flag it is to be respected, sure: a serviceperson's funeral, for example. The flag flying from the Parliament Buildings is a good thing to see, as is the flag on government buildings coast-to-coast. The flag in sports stadiums is a fine sight as well, though there is no requirement to face the flag and hold your hand over your heart when the national anthem plays. (I once said that when the national anthems play at sports games, the American puts his hand on his heart, the Canadian keeps his hand on his beer. )

But we also use the flag to sell used cars, to advertise supermarkets, and to decorate our bodies. It's not quite the object of veneration that the US flag seems to be for Americans.
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Old 01-31-2013, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,456,056 times
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I find our bigger cities are more modern-looking and have flashier looking skylines and buildings, comparatively. I know that's dumb and doesn't matter, but still a difference.

People are way more direct in the states in general. A few months back I was in Minneapolis and Atlanta, I was blown away by how people have no nervousness or shyness in approaching you or asking you something. Here people **** their pants and apologize if they have a question for a stranger.
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Old 01-31-2013, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,706 posts, read 8,789,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
I find our bigger cities are more modern-looking and have flashier looking skylines and buildings, comparatively. I know that's dumb and doesn't matter, but still a difference.

People are way more direct in the states in general. A few months back I was in Minneapolis and Atlanta, I was blown away by how people have no nervousness or shyness in approaching you or asking you something. Here people **** their pants and apologize if they have a question for a stranger.
I was just talking to someone about this the other day. I don't think Canadians are nervous or shy in approaching strangers to ask a question. We are just programmed to say " excuse me, I hate to bother you, but do you have the time?" rather than " do you have the time?"
Our use of sorry and thank you, instead of " uh huh", etc is what gives the impression that Canadians are polite. I'm sure there are parts of the states,probably in the south?? where folks say thank you, but my experience has been an smile and "uh huh" instead.
I remember years ago when I was taking a friend to the U.S. that I had to explain the the " uh huh " was them meaning thank you and that they weren't being rude.
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Old 02-04-2013, 03:36 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
15,112 posts, read 13,829,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I was just talking to someone about this the other day. I don't think Canadians are nervous or shy in approaching strangers to ask a question. We are just programmed to say " excuse me, I hate to bother you, but do you have the time?" rather than " do you have the time?"
Our use of sorry and thank you, instead of " uh huh", etc is what gives the impression that Canadians are polite. I'm sure there are parts of the states,probably in the south?? where folks say thank you, but my experience has been an smile and "uh huh" instead.
I remember years ago when I was taking a friend to the U.S. that I had to explain the the " uh huh " was them meaning thank you and that they weren't being rude.
Is saying a "huh?" when one asks someone to repeat what they said considered rude? Not sure if that was cultural or just a personal peeve of the person I was visiting.
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Old 02-04-2013, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemycomputer90 View Post
Is saying a "huh?" when one asks someone to repeat what they said considered rude? Not sure if that was cultural or just a personal peeve of the person I was visiting.
No, in that case no one would think that's rude. It's the " ah huh " in place of " you're welcome " that Canadians notice.
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Old 02-05-2013, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,706 posts, read 8,789,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemycomputer90 View Post
Is saying a "huh?" when one asks someone to repeat what they said considered rude? Not sure if that was cultural or just a personal peeve of the person I was visiting.
Re-thinking my last post. It depends on how " huh " was uttered. What tone etc. Most, not all, Canadians when talking to a stranger would say " I'm sorry? " but might say " huh " if it's someone they know well. Very individual though...also depends on age..you know those teenagers
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Old 02-05-2013, 02:29 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
15,112 posts, read 13,829,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Re-thinking my last post. It depends on how " huh " was uttered. What tone etc. Most, not all, Canadians when talking to a stranger would say " I'm sorry? " but might say " huh " if it's someone they know well. Very individual though...also depends on age..you know those teenagers
Interesting. I say them all: "huh?", "what's that?", "I'm sorry?", or once in a while "pardon?". They didn't like "huh" though. Of course no disrespect was intended, but it was a very hard habit to break.
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Old 02-05-2013, 02:57 PM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,859,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
I find our bigger cities are more modern-looking and have flashier looking skylines and buildings, comparatively. I know that's dumb and doesn't matter, but still a difference.

People are way more direct in the states in general. A few months back I was in Minneapolis and Atlanta, I was blown away by how people have no nervousness or shyness in approaching you or asking you something. Here people **** their pants and apologize if they have a question for a stranger.
I think that's more common in eastern states, too. I know here in the Pacific Northwest, I'm rarely stopped on the street by someone unless they are homeless or asking for directions.
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Old 02-05-2013, 03:09 PM
 
166 posts, read 163,933 times
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Tim Horton donuts are the very best.
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Old 02-05-2013, 03:14 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
15,112 posts, read 13,829,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GailL2007 View Post
Tim Horton donuts are the very best.
Yes! Good coffee too. I went there several times when I was visiting. Ironically, they opened one in a town near my home here in New Jersey in January. Apparently it's the first Tim Hortons in the state. I think they could give Dunkin Donuts and Starbucks a run for their money if some franchises were opened up.
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