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Old 03-22-2013, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 232,219 times
Reputation: 70

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Quote:
Originally Posted by iNviNciBL3 View Post
I don't agree nor disagree but these statements seem very broad.
Yeah fair enough...I suppose I was just responding to the nature of the original question about Quebec vs English Canada...which in itself is a broad ranging argument full of historic and old stereotypes...
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Old 03-24-2013, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
371 posts, read 984,724 times
Reputation: 565
Quote:
Originally Posted by orca17 View Post
My perspective is a bit different from some, because my mother was Canadian and from a fairly early age I was used to dealing with Canadians and being around them. That said, these are only my opinions.

Canadians seem much better informed about the world in general. Americans tend to be more nationalistic and isolationist. I dare say that Canadians know more about America than Americans know about Canada. I cringe whenever I see a television program say, for example, "Toronto, Canada", as if they have no idea what province it is in, or that this is irrelevant information. I never hear anyone say, "Los Angeles, America".

Someone mentioned the American south - the area where I grew up. Having a Canadian mother was a big bonus, because she didn't have the kind of racial baggage that most American southerners had in the 1960s. She gave me a perspective different from the prevailing view, which was almost universally prejudicial.

Regarding politics, Canadians will discuss the subject, but they don't seem to have the firmly entrenched prejudices that many Americans do. They tend to consider all sides more often. I have noticed that one thing that ruffles many Canadian feathers rather quickly is the subject of Quebec. My grandfather, who seldom commented on anything politically other than his general disdain for all politicians, got rather aggravated the last time I visited him. The provincial premiers were holding their annual meeting in St. John's (the area I was visiting), and the Premier of Quebec (I don't recall his name, unfortunately) made a big point of arriving late and holding a press conference at the airport. His colleagues were visibly miffed at his antics, and a couple of them spoke their minds to reporters. Quebec was about to hold yet another of their independence votes, and my grandfather said that this man was viewing himself as the first Prime Minister of an independent Quebec. His behavior did remind me of a head of state, which he was not.

My mother used to say, "Canadians don't understand the problems Americans have with race, but say 'French Canadian' to them, and watch the fun begin." (My mother was from Newfoundland.). When I bought a Newfoundland flag to take home, one of my cousins suggested that we take it with us and invade Quebec - and I'm not sure that he was entirely kidding.

Canadians don't have the obsession with firearms that many Americans do, and they stand as living proof that you don't need a gun in every house to have a safe society.

Canada heavily taxes everything, but I suppose that you have to pay for government programs somehow.

There is a definite difference in attitudes. When I last entered the country, the Canadian customs agent asked me my destination, the purpose of my trip and how long I would be staying. When we finished, he told me to enjoy my trip, and I got the idea that he truly meant it. Going back home, the American customs agents acted as if it would make their day to catch me with something in my luggage that I shouldn't have - and these were my own countrymen. On one trip back from Canada when my mother was still living, a US Customs agent made her break open a sealed box of chocolates and he took one and ate it - just to prove that we weren't carrying contraband.

If I were younger, I would probably move north of the border. In attitude, beliefs and demeanor, I am much more Canadian than American.
LOL, co-workers where I live now (central MN) would ask me how far Winnipeg was from where I grew up. Answer: 2hrs going up, 3hrs (hopefully) coming back.
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Old 03-25-2013, 04:51 PM
 
920 posts, read 1,734,699 times
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I've only been to Canada once, some years ago- but I was there for a few months. It was my first time out of the country, and it seemed strangely familiar, yet different. It was odd for me to see Canadian flags flying, where I was always used to an American one. It seemed much cleaner than in the States, roads, etc. People seemed much more laid back, friendlier, although not as outgoing as, say, Californians (who will talk to complete strangers as if they have known them their entire lives), but very polite- maybe it was just me, but the whole "sense" I got from Canada, was of a country where people didn't seem to be as....frayed, nervous, agitated, etc.- I recall once a couple of guys walked up to us with backpacks on to ask for change, and we gave them some- they were very polite, "thank you, ma'am", not like in the States where they would cuss you out if you didn't give them anything, and scared you with a wild-eyed look anyway, lol. I felt a general sense of peace, really. I know, sounds esoteric, but that really is how it felt for me, there.

One other thing, sort of odd to me at the time- in the grocery stores, I would look at the various fruit from the States (I'm originally from the Central Valley in California, where they grow a lot of it), and I was amazed at how huge the majority of it was. I mean, oranges the size of softballs. Having grown up around vineyards, orchards, etc., I couldn't recall seeing fruit of the size that I was seeing in Canada, and then it occurred to me.....we sent the good stuff out, and they were selling us the culls, lol!
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Old 03-26-2013, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Corona the I.E.
10,082 posts, read 14,067,052 times
Reputation: 8930
I didn't read all the pages, but I have noticed a lot of Canadians are very nice people. The weather sucks but the people more than make up for it. What I really like about Canadians, and some of my extended family is Canuck, is the question why and think independently.

I wish Stephen Harper could be our President BTW.
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Old 03-27-2013, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 232,219 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colorado xxxxx View Post

I wish Stephen Harper could be our President BTW.
He's basically like Bush.
+ he's ruining the environment in favour of exploiting resources.
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Old 03-27-2013, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,967 posts, read 27,436,169 times
Reputation: 8626
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwertyjjj View Post
He's basically like Bush.
.
Not quite - he's not as well armed!
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Old 03-27-2013, 07:10 AM
 
292 posts, read 402,407 times
Reputation: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwertyjjj View Post
He's basically like Bush.
+ he's ruining the environment in favour of exploiting resources.
Harper is nothing like Bush. He's no redneck puppet; he's a cunning genius who keeps a very tight rein on everybody in his party. He's suppressed all of his party's attempts to bring social conservatism to the fore, he certainly hasn't tried to privatize Canada's pension system or started any stupid wars, and he's actually trying to balance the budget (whether he'll be able to or not only time will tell).

Though it is true that he has muzzled scientists and ended some environmental research, for those who care about that kind of stuff.

In terms of legislation, aside from the environmental stuff, Harper is not much to the right of Obama - except he actually gets things done (thanks to the Canadian parliamentary system).
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Old 03-27-2013, 07:17 AM
 
Location: Corona the I.E.
10,082 posts, read 14,067,052 times
Reputation: 8930
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwertyjjj View Post
He's basically like Bush.
+ he's ruining the environment in favour of exploiting resources.
Really, I know he is pro business but he seemed pretty balanced hearing him speak and people in Ontario and Alberta I know like him, esp Alberta for obvious reasons.

And he can speak an entire paragraph without Bushisms
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Old 03-27-2013, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,607 posts, read 11,114,388 times
Reputation: 10334
Quote:
Originally Posted by qwertyjjj View Post
He's basically like Bush.
+ he's ruining the environment in favour of exploiting resources.
Totally going off topic, but you do realize that the vast majority of Canada's economy is resource based, right?
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Old 03-27-2013, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Canada
171 posts, read 232,219 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paparappa View Post
Harper is nothing like Bush. He's no redneck puppet; he's a cunning genius who keeps a very tight rein on everybody in his party. He's suppressed all of his party's attempts to bring social conservatism to the fore, he certainly hasn't tried to privatize Canada's pension system or started any stupid wars, and he's actually trying to balance the budget (whether he'll be able to or not only time will tell).

Though it is true that he has muzzled scientists and ended some environmental research, for those who care about that kind of stuff.

In terms of legislation, aside from the environmental stuff, Harper is not much to the right of Obama - except he actually gets things done (thanks to the Canadian parliamentary system).
An interesting post: Harm Harper’s done to our country is beyond imagining | Citizen Action Monitor
Obviously, it's written by someone against Harper but raises a few interesting points.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
Totally going off topic, but you do realize that the vast majority of Canada's economy is resource based, right?
That's true but I guess there is a balance to be struck in favour of renewables (especially nowadays). Obviously that's never going to happen with the amount of money at stake over in Alberta.
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