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Old 03-27-2013, 01:23 PM
 
1,746 posts, read 4,639,279 times
Reputation: 1166

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Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Yesterday, here in Toronto, I had a Doctor's appointment at a downtown hospital.

I went by Toronto Transit , on two buses, and a street car. This was at noon on a week day.

At the first bus stop, there was a elderly guy in a electric wheel chair , waiting for the bus along with about 20 other people.

When the bus arrived, everyone stood still, while the driver lowered the wheel chair ramp for the man in the wheel chair, who got on, then the driver folded up the three seat handicapped bench, and helped him to strap his chair in place. That took about 5 minutes. As the passengers were waiting, no body tried to jump on board. They simply waited, patiently, to get on.

The same thing took place when the man in the wheelchair reached his destination at College Street. The bus was quite full by this point, and in order for the man to get off the bus, a number of the other passengers got off and stood on the sidewalk, to allow him room to move his wheelchair. No body had to be told to do that, they simply did it.

Polite, and patient, and willing to wait for a handicapped person to use the bus.

BTW, ALL the TTC buses, have a design that includes a wheelchair ramp, and a "kneeling feature " that allows the driver to lower the front steps, for elderly people to get on easier. The front seats fold up on either side of the aisle, to accommodate two wheelchairs.

A woman, who turned out to be a recent Immigrant to Canada, from Russia, remarked to me that she now knew that she had made the right decision, to move to Canada. She told me that " In Russia that would never happen ". I smiled and said " Welcome to our country ".

Jim B

Toronto.
Jim B,

Thank you for sharing. You almost made me cry.

Let me assure you that things like that happen in NYC (or anywhere else) on the everyday basis. Nothing to be proud about.
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Old 03-27-2013, 01:59 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,713 posts, read 8,792,917 times
Reputation: 7329
Quote:
Originally Posted by movingwiththewind View Post
Jim B,

Thank you for sharing. You almost made me cry.

Let me assure you that things like that happen in NYC (or anywhere else) on the everyday basis. Nothing to be proud about.
Yes things like this do happen all over the world. It's a nice story though. I think it's a bit dangerous for anyone to think that their country is the only one, or one of the few, with considerate people or moral people. You dehumanize others by believing it too much.
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Old 03-27-2013, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,713 posts, read 8,792,917 times
Reputation: 7329
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Yes things like this do happen all over the world. It's a nice story though. I think it's a bit dangerous for anyone to think that their country is the only one, or one of the few, with considerate people or moral people. You dehumanize others by believing it too much.
and by you I mean we.
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Old 03-27-2013, 04:36 PM
 
9,967 posts, read 14,645,703 times
Reputation: 9193
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Yesterday, here in Toronto, I had a Doctor's appointment at a downtown hospital.

I went by Toronto Transit , on two buses, and a street car. This was at noon on a week day.

At the first bus stop, there was a elderly guy in a electric wheel chair , waiting for the bus along with about 20 other people.

When the bus arrived, everyone stood still, while the driver lowered the wheel chair ramp for the man in the wheel chair, who got on, then the driver folded up the three seat handicapped bench, and helped him to strap his chair in place. That took about 5 minutes. As the passengers were waiting, no body tried to jump on board. They simply waited, patiently, to get on.

The same thing took place when the man in the wheelchair reached his destination at College Street. The bus was quite full by this point, and in order for the man to get off the bus, a number of the other passengers got off and stood on the sidewalk, to allow him room to move his wheelchair. No body had to be told to do that, they simply did it.

Polite, and patient, and willing to wait for a handicapped person to use the bus.

BTW, ALL the TTC buses, have a design that includes a wheelchair ramp, and a "kneeling feature " that allows the driver to lower the front steps, for elderly people to get on easier. The front seats fold up on either side of the aisle, to accommodate two wheelchairs.

A woman, who turned out to be a recent Immigrant to Canada, from Russia, remarked to me that she now knew that she had made the right decision, to move to Canada. She told me that " In Russia that would never happen ". I smiled and said " Welcome to our country ".

Jim B

Toronto.
I live in Portland, Oregon and ride the bus and see this same thing happen every week. And people act the same way. I don't even consider Portland the most friendly or polite city, but people understand the basic etiquette of the situation.
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Old 03-27-2013, 08:11 PM
 
920 posts, read 1,734,096 times
Reputation: 865
After reading the newer posts, I remembered something else interesting about Canada while I was there. This, for me at least, was a huge eye-opener. I would always watch the news over there, I can't recall the station, but apparently this newscaster was a relatively popular guy, there- older man, white hair, somewhat balding...anyway, I would hear various things that were going on in the States, or between Canada and the States. One thing I do recall, was hearing something about some sort of lumber issue, along with a beef issue- that the U.S. was going to open the border again for Canada to export into the U.S. (please forgive, I really don't recall details), or something along those lines. At the time, Bush wanted Canada to go to war with the U.S. against Iraq. Canada basically said, "No way, Jose'", and all of a sudden, all bets with opening the border to exports were off- and Condie Rice, who was supposed to visit Canada that week, all of a sudden cancelled her trip. I talked to family in the States (who also watch the news all of the time) and asked if they had heard about that. They had heard nothing, not a word. I recall thinking that was odd. So, I started watching the news more closely, and checking with family in the States regarding what I was hearing in Canada. I discovered that the news being reported in Canada, was not the same as that being reported back home, at all. Now, I know it sounds naive' to say that I was really shocked, but I truly was. I'm not an uneducated, backwards person, but to come to the realization that our media-and more- basically kept us in the dark about a lot of things going on not only with our country, but other countries as well was like having scales taken off of my eyes. I literally had no idea, never thought that my country was like that. Someone is bound to say, "hey, wait a minute- ever hear of getting your news OUTSIDE of the country, or alternative news, etc.?"- and no, that never really occurred to me either. Why? Because when you believe that what you are hearing is the truth, and you have no reason to believe otherwise, why look elsewhere?

For those on here who are Canadians and have a somewhat...irritating view of Americans, I hope you would try to understand this; we're a product of the entire "American Way of Life", you know? A product of our environment, our educational system, things that we're told, things we are made to believe, that we have believed our entire lives. And I don't know about any other Americans on this board, but my entire life I have always believed that our..."system" here was honest, more so than a lot of countries- and it wasn't until I went to Canada, heard the things I heard and saw the things that I saw, that I began to really question what I had believed my entire life. We're not awful people- well, most of us aren't, lol- but Canadians are just fortunate in the fact that you are still living the kind of life that was around when I was young, when people still had a higher sense of decency and honesty, and respected parameters more than they do today. That's not to say that decency and honesty have disappeared here, it just isn't the same as it used to be. I think that's the one thing that I liked so much about Canada when I was there; it reminded me of the America I used to know and love, the America we used to be.
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Old 03-27-2013, 08:14 PM
 
920 posts, read 1,734,096 times
Reputation: 865
Oh, one last thing. I absolutely LOVED watching "Corner Gas", lol.
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Old 03-28-2013, 06:49 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 3,281,660 times
Reputation: 6774
Mosty:

You summed it up pretty well.

Americans are fed a lot of dumb stuff, disguised as "news ". I call some of it " Faux News ".

I think that you were watching Peter Mansbridge, on CBC's National, the nightly nation wide news program.

I'll point out that if you want to get a objective point of view, on both domestic and foreign news, you can read some of our media on-line. As you pointed out in your post, it is instructive to see what others report about your own country's actions.

Jim b

Toronto.
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Old 03-28-2013, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,962 posts, read 27,422,840 times
Reputation: 8626
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Yes things like this do happen all over the world. It's a nice story though. I think it's a bit dangerous for anyone to think that their country is the only one, or one of the few, with considerate people or moral people. You dehumanize others by believing it too much.
Excellent point. Totally agree.
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Old 03-28-2013, 11:05 AM
 
1,746 posts, read 4,639,279 times
Reputation: 1166
Quote:
Originally Posted by mostie View Post
For those on here who are Canadians and have a somewhat...irritating view of Americans, I hope you would try to understand this; we're a product of the entire "American Way of Life", you know? A product of our environment, our educational system, things that we're told, things we are made to believe, that we have believed our entire lives. And I don't know about any other Americans on this board, but my entire life I have always believed that our..."system" here was honest, more so than a lot of countries- and it wasn't until I went to Canada, heard the things I heard and saw the things that I saw, that I began to really question what I had believed my entire life. We're not awful people- well, most of us aren't, lol- but Canadians are just fortunate in the fact that you are still living the kind of life that was around when I was young, when people still had a higher sense of decency and honesty, and respected parameters more than they do today. That's not to say that decency and honesty have disappeared here, it just isn't the same as it used to be. I think that's the one thing that I liked so much about Canada when I was there; it reminded me of the America I used to know and love, the America we used to be.
Right.

And who do you think Canadians (or Germans, French, Russians, Chinese and so on) are? They are all products of their environment and their Way of Life.

How objective, do you think, major national news programs are in other countries, Canada including? Do you really think, they are not selective in what and how to "sell" news to their population and how to teach Canadian history and other subjects in Canadian schools?

In particular, if there is a dispute between Canada and the US on a particular subject, in what favour do you think Canadian news would ALWAYS be, Canada right or wrong?

My point is: Good for you that you, after spending some time in Canada, understand that there are many ways of life and that people in different countries do things differently, that it's not always right or wrong, black or white. It's a very valuable experience and a life discovery.

However, remember, Canadians (or citizens of any other country) are brainwashed in their own way. People are brainwashed into who they are and what they believe anywhere you go.

ALL of us are products of our environment. Belief systems of Canadians are produced/created as much as belief systems of Americans. Don't be naive: There is no country that does everything the right way.
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Old 03-28-2013, 11:30 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,696 posts, read 6,552,548 times
Reputation: 8203
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Yesterday, here in Toronto, I had a Doctor's appointment at a downtown hospital.

I went by Toronto Transit , on two buses, and a street car. This was at noon on a week day.

At the first bus stop, there was a elderly guy in a electric wheel chair , waiting for the bus along with about 20 other people.

When the bus arrived, everyone stood still, while the driver lowered the wheel chair ramp for the man in the wheel chair, who got on, then the driver folded up the three seat handicapped bench, and helped him to strap his chair in place. That took about 5 minutes. As the passengers were waiting, no body tried to jump on board. They simply waited, patiently, to get on.

The same thing took place when the man in the wheelchair reached his destination at College Street. The bus was quite full by this point, and in order for the man to get off the bus, a number of the other passengers got off and stood on the sidewalk, to allow him room to move his wheelchair. No body had to be told to do that, they simply did it.

Polite, and patient, and willing to wait for a handicapped person to use the bus.

BTW, ALL the TTC buses, have a design that includes a wheelchair ramp, and a "kneeling feature " that allows the driver to lower the front steps, for elderly people to get on easier. The front seats fold up on either side of the aisle, to accommodate two wheelchairs.

A woman, who turned out to be a recent Immigrant to Canada, from Russia, remarked to me that she now knew that she had made the right decision, to move to Canada. She told me that " In Russia that would never happen ". I smiled and said " Welcome to our country ".

Jim B

Toronto.
This says less about Canada then it does about Russia. Google "Russian attitudes toward the disabled."

I saw similar acts of patience, for want of a better word, in eastern Germany, right after the wall came down. There were no ramps for the buses - when a bus stopped, complete strangers would, as if by previous agreement, scoop up the stroller/wheelchair and deposit it on the bus (person included of course).
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