U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-12-2015, 05:14 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,390,495 times
Reputation: 8613

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post

America requires only that you believe in the social experiment that was started over 200 years ago. As a naturalized American once said, "I could live in France for a lifetime and never become a Frenchman. But here in America, after five years I can become an American complete with a accent."
.
You can pretty much do this in Canada too. Canada is not France.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-12-2015, 05:16 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,390,495 times
Reputation: 8613
Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
.

In response to the kidnapping of government ministers, the Liberal government in Ottawa imposed press censorship throughout the country. I read the Vancouver Sun with big white spaces on the front page where articles had been pulled.
.
What exactly are you talking about here? The October Crisis in Quebec in 1970? There wasn't really any press censorship during that situation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,450,055 times
Reputation: 3262
Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
My observations.....part of an editorial on what it means to be an American. Circa...1973.


Shortly after that lecture, I packed my truck, stuck Allman Brothers into the tape deck and left Canada playing "Southbound" at maximum volume.
In the late 60s and early 70s over a hundred thousand Americans were driving the other way, northbound. They were welcomed here, many stayed and became Canadian.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7nNGVL6I_s
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Out in the Badlands
10,425 posts, read 8,794,092 times
Reputation: 7738
everyone is always saying "eh"
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
1,207 posts, read 1,200,518 times
Reputation: 1377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amber18 View Post
no liquor sold in grocery stores
you used to see a lot of decorating for holidays around here but its definitely not as big as it used to be
Why do you think decorating is not as big as it used to be?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 01:53 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
7,281 posts, read 6,604,283 times
Reputation: 14325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Amber18 View Post

no liquor sold in grocery stores
I think that is about to change. BC has changed that law and soon grocery stores around the province will be selling wine and other spirits. The first grocery store to start selling wine was on April 1st this year, there will soon be more grocery stores doing likewise starting this year. If this proves to be a successful venture in BC then I imagine that other provinces across the nation will follow in BC's footsteps.
Save-on-Foods in South Surrey first grocery store to sell B.C. wines | Metro


Quote:
Originally Posted by Amber18 View Post

you used to see a lot of decorating for holidays around here but its definitely not as big as it used to be
Could it be that less holiday decorating is just a localized thing in your own community then? Because it's a big deal in BC and becoming increasingly more so with each passing year, especially in the lower mainland. Entire neighbourhoods have competitions to see who can out do each other with Christmas holiday decorations, bus tours get arranged to view the lights in parks, gardens, neighbourhoods, businesses, the main streets on certain towns, etc. During the spring, summer and autumn there are other holiday events where towns and neighbourhoods go all out to put up decorations in celebration of holidays and seasonal events and festivals.

.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,703 posts, read 8,775,044 times
Reputation: 7319
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
And your feelings now, 42 years later? Because I see so much wrong with your post, I don't know where to begin.
Please begin Chevy !!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,961 posts, read 27,390,495 times
Reputation: 8613
And liquor is sold in grocery stores in some provinces. Just not Ontario for example. And not BC I guess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,265 posts, read 13,177,239 times
Reputation: 13467
^^^ I'm hoping that's going to change, but I think Wynne is just blowing smoke up our collective ass.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-12-2015, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,179 posts, read 1,757,065 times
Reputation: 2652
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Please begin Chevy !!
Well, let's see. Canada in 1973 was a very different place than it is today, so we must take that into account.

Still, seeing Canada's head of state--that is, the Queen--on Canadian money shouldn't have come as a surprise, especially to an American. Americans have been putting heads of state on their currency since forever: Washington on the $1 bill, Jefferson on the $2 bill, Lincoln on the $5 bill, and so on. Neither Alexander Hamilton ($10 bill) nor Benjamin Franklin ($100 bill) were US heads of state, but they are also on American currency--and in the 1969 Bank of Canada series of banknotes, for the first time in Canada's history, former PMs appeared: Wilfrid Laurier appeared on the $5 bill, Macdonald on the $10 bill, King on the $50 bill, and Borden on the $100 bill. But in Canada, prime ministers, like Franklin and Hamilton, are not heads of state. By 1973, he would not have seen every bill in his wallet bear a portrait of the Queen.

On coins? Sure. But not all: as I recall in 1973, there were still plenty of George VI pennies, and fewer George V pennies, in circulation. Canada got rid of silver dimes and quarters in about 1968, so those were being hoarded by collectors, and post-1968 Elizabeth coins were very common.

Our friend continues:

Quote:
In response to the kidnapping of government ministers, the Liberal government in Ottawa imposed press censorship throughout the country. I read the Vancouver Sun with big white spaces on the front page where articles had been pulled.

Nobody complained or demonstrated. It dawned on me the First Amendment did not apply north of the border.
I'm glad to see that he realized that his US constitutional rights did not extend outside the US; but I am equally saddened to hear his "media silenced" story, which I can only call BS on. "The kidnapping of government ministers" has only happened once in our history, and it wasn't plural; it was singular: "minister." Yes, Pierre Laporte, a Quebec cabinet minister, was kidnapped in 1970 by the FLQ, which later executed him, but I do not recall any press censorship. On the contrary, the broadcast media gave minute-by-minute updates on the situation, while the print media caught up in extra late editions and extra morning editions. With such widespread news coverage, there was no need to demonstrate that there wasn't any news coverage.

Needless to say, the Liberal government in Ottawa never imposed press censorship. Hell, to this day, you can still watch YouTube clips of Prime Minister Trudeau telling reporters to "Just watch me." In spite of the fact that there was no Charter s. 2(b) in those days, the principle of "freedom of speech" was ingrained in the Canadian psyche, and part of Canada's "rule of law" obligations; and to offend those was to commit political suicide.

"Big white spaces" on the front page of the Vancouver Sun? I'll need a cite for that, and I will only accept one from the Vancouver Sun archives. Should it be true--and I'll allow that it just might--I'm 99.999% sure that the government had nothing to do with it. In such a case, it may have had more to do with an editor who was waiting for news, got none to put in the space he allocated for it by the deadline, and ran the presses anyway, saving the space for the next edition.

Let's continue:

Quote:
A graduate student spent 10 minutes talking about the historical differences between Canada and the United States. He pointed out that Canada was founded by a corporation - the Hudson's Bay Company. There was no revolution in Canada and its independence was at Britain's insistence, rather than Canada's. He joked that the reason Canadians have socialized medicine is it began as a corporate benefit. Like most businesses, the emphasis is on fitting in with the corporate culture. Creativity and individualism are not encouraged, but solid contributions to the existing state are.

This is why Canadian research is focused on practical application and also why scientific breakthroughs tend happen in the United States.

An individual will take more risks than groups or committees.
Now here, our friend is getting a history lesson from somebody who, by their very qualifications as a forester, is not a historian. Of course, the lecturer may have been subject to the same history lessons as the rest of us in high school, but I can, to this day, point out where at least one of my high school teachers was wrong. And so, it appears, was at least one of this lecturer's high school teachers.

The Hudson's Bay Company did not found Canada. It played an important role in trade and settlement, and I have heard more than one legal history professor remark that Canada as we know it today would not exist without the Hudson's Bay Company. But none of them, nor any historians, assert that the Hudson's Bay Company "founded Canada."

Next, the claim that "the reason Canadians have socialized medicine is it began as a corporate benefit." Here, I will give him part-marks, as prior to adopting provincial health insurance, Canadians did have private health insurance, just as Americans do nowadays. I was a child in Ontario, and I was alive prior to OHIP, and I had a couple of surgical operations as a child that were covered by the heath insurance my Dad got through his employer. It was a corporate benefit, in other words.

But to link "corporate benefit" to "socialized medicine" is stretching it, I think. If that was the case, we'd see all 50 states, where health insurance is a corporate benefit, eagerly embracing socialized medicine. But they are not. Logically, then, health insurance as a corporate benefit does not necessarily lead to "socialized medicine."

It certainly did not in Canada. What Canada has is not socialized medicine--it is a single-payer health insurance plan, where physicians remain self-employed, and simply bill the provincial plan every time they see a covered patient. If the patient is not covered by the provincial plan, the physician will gladly bill the necessary insurer (often done in the case of visiting Americans who need care and have a policy from an American insurer), or accept cash or credit cards. Homer Simpson incorrectly asserted, on his visit to Toronto, that "it's okay Marge--they have free health care." Well, maybe in a socialized system, we would. But it's not, and we don't.

It's late, Nat, and I've probably missed a few points, but I'm tired. Can I call it a night for now?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top