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Old 06-02-2015, 12:15 AM
 
3,751 posts, read 3,717,163 times
Reputation: 3526

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
This is such a personal thing. I find people talk to me easily in both countries. That said, there is a Canadian wall if a stranger starts probing about your religion or politics.
Really? I found in Canada it seems like politics is all people want to talk about with me lol
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Old 06-02-2015, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Vernon, British Columbia
3,019 posts, read 2,694,205 times
Reputation: 2132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
The shoes thing is true and has been discussed on CD before, with some Americans, saying they do the same. It is more prevalent in Canada though.

" typically people that don't know she's American". You mean some people say that in front of her knowing she's American?!! Wow, talk about rude.

Highways slower? Do you mean regardless of the speed limit that people drive faster in the US? It really varies by state and province. For example B.C. highest speed limit of 120 KM per hour is higher than California's 112 KM per hour.

In reality, I find people drive faster than the posted speed limit of course. Again my experience tells me ,it really depends where in Canada or the US you are driving.
Here in BC I can take highway 97 south. The speed limit is 90km/h or even 100km in sections, but the government cheaps out over and over again, and installs 20 traffic lights such that by the time I hit the border, my average speed is 60km/h. That's a three hour drive. Then on the other side the highway is immediately faster. The speed limit is 60 mph, but much straighter. That's but one example. Other provinces are much better than BC. It's probably just a BC thing.
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Old 06-02-2015, 09:37 AM
 
18,268 posts, read 10,368,849 times
Reputation: 13325
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
The shoes thing is true and has been discussed on CD before, with some Americans, saying they do the same. It is more prevalent in Canada though.

" typically people that don't know she's American". You mean some people say that in front of her knowing she's American?!! Wow, talk about rude.

Highways slower? Do you mean regardless of the speed limit that people drive faster in the US? It really varies by state and province. For example B.C. highest speed limit of 120 KM per hour is higher than California's 112 KM per hour.

In reality, I find people drive faster than the posted speed limit of course. Again my experience tells me ,it really depends where in Canada or the US you are driving.
Haaar! The shoe thingy is lot's of fun. My regular golfing foursome in Florida has a couple of guys from the states and while emptying our bladders after a round of golf and a few brewskis will often be lined up at the urinals together prior to leaving the club. Comments are common about the little ponds of mellow yellow we end up standing in.

After arriving home and agreeing to carry on with some further drinks and horsey's doovers at each other's homes the occasion arose that Canadians were admonished by American hosts thusly: "This is America, you don't need to remove your shoes in our homes". My retired school principal compatriot Canadian put them to task with his rejoinder: "So in America we're expected to track that crap we were standing in back at the club urinals throughout your homes, good to know." At our homes, you'll fugging well not be ok with that ." "It's bad enough we track it onto our cars floor mats".

The looks on their faces were priceless as one of them drove a 2013 Vette that required his permission before you breathed on it. This conundrum had obviously never occurred to them. Suffice to say their wives came on board in a heartbeat and now demand their husbands remove their shoes upon entry.

CANADIANS rule once again!
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Old 06-02-2015, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,941 posts, read 27,338,144 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mini-apple-less View Post
Do you have a French accent at all when you speak English? That could explain why you are treated so well there, Americans love European-sounding accents. Also I think when you are on vacation in general, people pick up on your positive mood and are more receptive to you.

Then again, I live in one of the most reserved and unfriendly American states. The South and Midwest are definitely much warmer and communal IMO than the West and Northeast in that sense.
Sometimes I have an accent, sometimes I don't. I probably have an accent right now in English. If I spend a week in the States or speaking mostly English then it fades.

I don't think it has much of an impact. People are more talkative with strangers IMO in the States than they are in Canada west of the Ottawa River. People east of the Ottawa River in Canada are more talkative with strangers.
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Old 06-02-2015, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,941 posts, read 27,338,144 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glacierx View Post
Here in BC I can take highway 97 south. The speed limit is 90km/h or even 100km in sections, but the government cheaps out over and over again, and installs 20 traffic lights such that by the time I hit the border, my average speed is 60km/h. That's a three hour drive. Then on the other side the highway is immediately faster. The speed limit is 60 mph, but much straighter. That's but one example. Other provinces are much better than BC. It's probably just a BC thing.
Ontario-Quebec drivers are noticeably faster than American drivers in neighbouring states.
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Old 06-02-2015, 10:19 AM
 
Location: U.S. (East Coast)
1,231 posts, read 1,051,071 times
Reputation: 2627
Bunch of preps walking around with French accents. In America, outside of big towns, you don't see too much fancy-schmancy going on. We're beer, bonfire and BBQ people.
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Old 06-02-2015, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,723 posts, read 3,201,477 times
Reputation: 7177
Quote:
Originally Posted by G0DDESS View Post
Bunch of preps walking around with French accents. In America, outside of big towns, you don't see too much fancy-schmancy going on. We're beer, bonfire and BBQ people.
In Canada, outside of big towns, you don't see too much fancy-schmancy going on. They're (we're) beer, bonfire and BBQ people.
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Old 06-02-2015, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,747,108 times
Reputation: 7299
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Haaar! The shoe thingy is lot's of fun. My regular golfing foursome in Florida has a couple of guys from the states and while emptying our bladders after a round of golf and a few brewskis will often be lined up at the urinals together prior to leaving the club. Comments are common about the little ponds of mellow yellow we end up standing in.

After arriving home and agreeing to carry on with some further drinks and horsey's doovers at each other's homes the occasion arose that Canadians were admonished by American hosts thusly: "This is America, you don't need to remove your shoes in our homes". My retired school principal compatriot Canadian put them to task with his rejoinder: "So in America we're expected to track that crap we were standing in back at the club urinals throughout your homes, good to know." At our homes, you'll fugging well not be ok with that ." "It's bad enough we track it onto our cars floor mats".

The looks on their faces were priceless as one of them drove a 2013 Vette that required his permission before you breathed on it. This conundrum had obviously never occurred to them. Suffice to say their wives came on board in a heartbeat and now demand their husbands remove their shoes upon entry.

CANADIANS rule once again!
An earlier thread mentioned they thought Canadians did this because of the weather. While that may be partly true in some parts, but as you know we do it even on the loveliest of days.

I remember my American friend commenting on the 40 pairs of shoes in the foyer of a house party we were attending. " Where are we Japan? "

However...for really fancy, fancy house parties where it's not a group of friends, people tend to keep their shoes on.
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Old 06-02-2015, 06:15 PM
 
Location: Near Manito
19,520 posts, read 20,898,162 times
Reputation: 13855
Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
In Canada, outside of big towns, you don't see too much fancy-schmancy going on. They're (we're) beer, bonfire and BBQ people.
I'm going to need a working definition of fancy-schmancy. Does It have anything to do with the Jenner entity?
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Old 06-03-2015, 04:01 PM
 
Location: South Jersey
13,356 posts, read 7,018,519 times
Reputation: 4857
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glacierx View Post
My wife is from the States, and about 1/3 of the town's population where I grew up is also from the USA. As a result, I have a lot of American friends. One of the major differences Americans notice is that you have to take your shoes off when you enter someone's home. A friend just the other day told me about her first experience visiting her father-in-law for the first time in Canada. She was in the house 30 seconds before he yelled at her to take her shoes off.
I wonder how this particular difference came to be. Is the standard really different in Canada compared to the US? It would feel weird to take off your shoes the moment you step into someone else's house, especially if it's the first time you've ever been there. I would not take my shoes off unless it was suggested (or requested).

This is not the first time I've heard this. Or noticed it. A Canadian friend I have who visited me here and stayed at my (parents') house walked around barefoot much of the time. I wouldn't have been comfortable doing that in someone else's house. I would have at least worn socks.
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