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Old 06-08-2012, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Northern Ontario, Canada
230 posts, read 434,791 times
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No I can't say I have driven between Miami and Ft. Lauderdale. I did live in the suburbs of Philly for many years. Lots of attitude but the drivers aren't as bad as here.

This is just my experience, and I will admit I'm referring to the cities and towns I've visited or lived in (which is limited to southern/Eastern Ontario, as well as the Eastern townships of Quebec and Montreal). Maybe rural Manitoba, the Maritimes, Victoria Island, etc. are better. I'm just speaking from my experience.
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Old 06-08-2012, 02:42 PM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,701 posts, read 4,670,319 times
Reputation: 3676
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikmaq32 View Post
There might be an obvious reason for that, but I`m not gonna say.
??? These are observations as I watch them in traffic, especially in parking lots here at one of the huge outlet malls that many of them come down to. I have not personally been involved in any of these "incidents", I watch as they honk, cut people off, and just drive in other aggressive ways there. It's surprising because we don't see a whole lot of that, and so we look and just sort of make a mental note that it's yet again another BC license plate. We saw a fair amount of that up in Vancouver as well- again just observations, not anything we were directly involved in.
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Old 06-08-2012, 03:36 PM
 
1,723 posts, read 5,140,417 times
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My observation is that drivers in Ontario tend to drive somewhat more slowly and carefully than drivers on the eastern seaboard of the U.S. (New York to D.C.). Perhaps those high insurance rates have something to do with it. I have seen the most dangerous risky driving behaviour in South Florida. The worst tailgating drivers are in the south (NC, SC, GA). Ontario drivers are just plain middle of the road. They are more polite in that they tend not to honk, but they aren't necessarily any more likely to "let you in" either.
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Old 06-08-2012, 07:36 PM
 
242 posts, read 438,986 times
Reputation: 233
BREAKING NEWS GUYS: Rude drivers are everywhere.
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Old 06-09-2012, 02:51 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
70 posts, read 108,364 times
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Well, speaking of driving, I found that Toronto drivers are slower and less aggressive than East Coast U.S. cities like New York or Philadelphia. Crossing the street in Toronto didn't feel like playing dodgeball.
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Old 06-10-2012, 12:16 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,649,561 times
Reputation: 815
Quote:
Originally Posted by GTL_urbanlover08 View Post
Well, speaking of driving, I found that Toronto drivers are slower and less aggressive than East Coast U.S. cities like New York or Philadelphia. Crossing the street in Toronto didn't feel like playing dodgeball.
Agreed. I gotta say, those streetcars are good for pedestrians too.
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Old 06-10-2012, 01:34 PM
 
5 posts, read 8,678 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikmaq32 View Post
There might be an obvious reason for that, but I`m not gonna say.
Let me illustrate for you then:





Well, I'm not American, so I can't really comment, but my friends living near the border have commented to me that life is more peaceful in Canada. There's less "live for work" and more "work to live" attitude, but this is more of a general thought. Also, from my observation, Canadians who intend to live in the U.S. are usually seeking for an income upgrade, while Americans who intend to live in Canada usually wants an improvement in their quality of life.
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Old 06-12-2012, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Pluto's Home Town
9,995 posts, read 11,674,905 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by f1000 View Post
a few for me (but have spent alot of time in Canada so am more aware of the differences):

- smaller freeways (except Toronto) and hardly any (if any) flyovers, less development/ billboards alongside the freeways
- less master-planned and manicured communities as well as the other extreme of less ghetto-ized areas
- less extremes of social strata (less flaunting of wealthy but also less poor)
- less obese people of all variations
- far more British or British-influenced old people
- people are less likely to be preppy and more likely to be "granola"
- French on packaging of consumer goods
- less displays of patriotism, military affiliations, religion- no megachurches
- more cosmopolitan feeling in big cities vs US counterparts (hard to describe until you visit)
- more expensive
Love all this, except the last bullet.

I must be a Canadian at heart.

When I was traveling through Asia many moons ago, I kept meeting up with Canadians (not many Americans were vagabonding about then). I enjoyed their sense of humor and sense that not everything is about them. Seemed to me that the Brits and Americans were pretty self-consumed. I considered the Canadians the "decaffeinated Americans." Many similarities, less hubris.
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Old 06-12-2012, 08:33 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,377,277 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fiddlehead View Post
Love all this, except the last bullet.

I must be a Canadian at heart.

When I was traveling through Asia many moons ago, I kept meeting up with Canadians (not many Americans were vagabonding about then). I enjoyed their sense of humor and sense that not everything is about them. Seemed to me that the Brits and Americans were pretty self-consumed. I considered the Canadians the "decaffeinated Americans." Many similarities, less hubris.
Interesting. Most Americans I meet (maybe it's the fact I've met a few from San Francisco) seemed pretty critical of America in general.
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Old 06-13-2012, 12:20 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,226 posts, read 6,579,297 times
Reputation: 14183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Interesting. Most Americans I meet (maybe it's the fact I've met a few from San Francisco) seemed pretty critical of America in general.
What I want to know, since this topic in general was directed at Americans, is why was it posted in the Canada forum? Why wasn't this topic started in one of the American forums where the Americans it's aimed at would read it and respond to it?

.
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