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Old 06-14-2012, 04:49 PM
 
3,097 posts, read 4,151,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucknow View Post
That sure isn't the case where I live. Niagara Falls Ontario is a beautiful city. Go across the bridge to NF NY and it's pathetic. There just is not any comparison at all.

I feel a major difference where ever it is I cross the border and I have crossed almost all of them rght across the country.
I have to disagree, outside of the tourist area, NF Canada is not all that great, looks similar to the other side. Now if we are talking about Niagara on the Lake, well that is a different story.
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Old 06-14-2012, 07:05 PM
 
242 posts, read 438,774 times
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The whole Niagara Falls/St Catherines area is basically a spillover of Buffalo. Most people from Ontario are well aware of that.

One big thing I notice is that most of the buildings in Canada (specifically the Greater Golden Horseshoe area) are very new. The cities and communities have a very urban, new feeling while in the US it's more old. I think this is because the US went through a huge building boom in the 1950's and 1960's which included quite a bit of urban sprawl. These homes now look very dated and old simply because the building style back then was more simplistic and practical. In the greater Golden Horseshoe however, the big building boom occurred more in the 1990's and 2000's allowing the buildings to look much more modern, giving the cities a newer feel. For example, the city of Barrie (90KM North of Downtown Toronto) had a population of 38,000 in 1981. The current population a mere 31 years later is approximately 138,000. In fact, 70% of all homes in Barrie are 25 years or newer! This is a common scene across much of the GTA, giving the main base of Canada a fresh modern urban feeling. I have friends who live in Ohio and it's always such a crazy feeling driving through Ohio, Pennsylvania, and upper New York State and then into Canada. It's like a transition from old, falling down, deteriorating ghost town feelings to a upbeat modern area. I'm sure people who have traveled in this area will understand what I'm getting at.
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Old 06-14-2012, 08:03 PM
 
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Part of the reason the Canadian side of Niagara Falls has grown better than the New York side, is due to this Love Canal - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-16-2012, 03:13 AM
 
136 posts, read 180,218 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by travis3000 View Post
The whole Niagara Falls/St Catherines area is basically a spillover of Buffalo. Most people from Ontario are well aware of that.

One big thing I notice is that most of the buildings in Canada (specifically the Greater Golden Horseshoe area) are very new. The cities and communities have a very urban, new feeling while in the US it's more old. I think this is because the US went through a huge building boom in the 1950's and 1960's which included quite a bit of urban sprawl. These homes now look very dated and old simply because the building style back then was more simplistic and practical. In the greater Golden Horseshoe however, the big building boom occurred more in the 1990's and 2000's allowing the buildings to look much more modern, giving the cities a newer feel. For example, the city of Barrie (90KM North of Downtown Toronto) had a population of 38,000 in 1981. The current population a mere 31 years later is approximately 138,000. In fact, 70% of all homes in Barrie are 25 years or newer! This is a common scene across much of the GTA, giving the main base of Canada a fresh modern urban feeling. I have friends who live in Ohio and it's always such a crazy feeling driving through Ohio, Pennsylvania, and upper New York State and then into Canada. It's like a transition from old, falling down, deteriorating ghost town feelings to a upbeat modern area. I'm sure people who have traveled in this area will understand what I'm getting at.
Is this a joke? You're actually contrasting the difference between Canada and the US by comparing the suburbs of Toronto to the rust belt?
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Old 06-16-2012, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
65 posts, read 161,462 times
Reputation: 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by travis3000 View Post
The whole Niagara Falls/St Catherines area is basically a spillover of Buffalo. Most people from Ontario are well aware of that.

One big thing I notice is that most of the buildings in Canada (specifically the Greater Golden Horseshoe area) are very new. The cities and communities have a very urban, new feeling while in the US it's more old. I think this is because the US went through a huge building boom in the 1950's and 1960's which included quite a bit of urban sprawl. These homes now look very dated and old simply because the building style back then was more simplistic and practical. In the greater Golden Horseshoe however, the big building boom occurred more in the 1990's and 2000's allowing the buildings to look much more modern, giving the cities a newer feel. For example, the city of Barrie (90KM North of Downtown Toronto) had a population of 38,000 in 1981. The current population a mere 31 years later is approximately 138,000. In fact, 70% of all homes in Barrie are 25 years or newer! This is a common scene across much of the GTA, giving the main base of Canada a fresh modern urban feeling. I have friends who live in Ohio and it's always such a crazy feeling driving through Ohio, Pennsylvania, and upper New York State and then into Canada. It's like a transition from old, falling down, deteriorating ghost town feelings to a upbeat modern area. I'm sure people who have traveled in this area will understand what I'm getting at.


I was born and raised in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and yes, indeed it's becoming an urban modern. Well, some parts of the city, like the south side and north side that is, lol. I traveled thru Ohio, PA and NY most times so, definitely know where you are getting that at. Well, to me it's not a crazy feeling driving through. The crazy part is driving through downtown areas and fighting traffic with all the crazy drivers out in U.S. However, never drove into Canada (yet) but, I assume it's much better on that side of the border well, to see the upbeat modern area...
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Old 06-16-2012, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Orange County, N.C.
242 posts, read 383,014 times
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For Americans, what are the biggest differences you notice in Canada?


EH!!!
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Old 06-17-2012, 09:53 AM
 
1,723 posts, read 5,138,090 times
Reputation: 1351
Quote:
Originally Posted by travis3000 View Post
The whole Niagara Falls/St Catherines area is basically a spillover of Buffalo. Most people from Ontario are well aware of that.
St. Catharines (not the 'a', not an 'e'), located about a 45 minute drive from Buffalo (and before the QEW was built, probably 2 hours by car) is a spillover of Buffalo?

I think not.

The only Canadian town that could even remotely be considered a suburb of Buffalo would be Fort Erie, and I am not even sure Fort Erie qualifies as a suburb based on commuting patterns.
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Old 06-17-2012, 09:58 AM
 
Location: southern california
55,634 posts, read 74,577,828 times
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Quebec everybody speaks French works for me
everybody nicer than usa and France combined
If a young bum hustle a young person he gets chewed out not paid off
not much white guilt in Quebec
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Old 06-17-2012, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,261,302 times
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Biggest difference in my opinion is very few black people as well as hispanics and things associated with hispanic culture. Also the weather and things that strike me as very British or British influenced.
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Old 06-17-2012, 01:24 PM
 
357 posts, read 1,251,100 times
Reputation: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
Biggest difference in my opinion is very few black people as well as hispanics and things associated with hispanic culture. Also the weather and things that strike me as very British or British influenced.
how can weather be influenced by Britain? Do they send their clouds over to Canada or something?
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