U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-15-2012, 09:02 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,958 posts, read 27,383,424 times
Reputation: 8612

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annuvin View Post
No? Then what do you think is the role of the Governor-General of Canada, symbolic or otherwise?
I don't understand the question.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-16-2012, 01:12 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,652,268 times
Reputation: 815
A better question - when did Canada truly become a nation of people, that identified as Canadians rather than as English, French, Native, a native of their province, etc? Probably pretty recently I'd think? I mean the Maple Leaf flag was created only in 1961, after more than 1/3 of living Canadian people were born!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 01:36 AM
 
455 posts, read 917,379 times
Reputation: 438
The maple leaf as a symbol for canada dates back to its colonial pre-confederation days. I'd say world war 1 was a turning point for canada as a nation the battle of pashendale comes to mind as a nation defining period.

Canada declaring war on germany two weeks after britain did in ww2 was another turning point. It may not seem like much but not declaring war on a country automatically the same time Britain did was huge. Modern Canadian identity as we know it now developed in the late 60's-70's before that there was still strong ties to britain as sort of heir to anglo-saxon values and government in north america aside from qubec of course.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,958 posts, read 27,383,424 times
Reputation: 8612
Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
A better question - when did Canada truly become a nation of people, that identified as Canadians rather than as English, French, Native, a native of their province, etc? Probably pretty recently I'd think? I mean the Maple Leaf flag was created only in 1961, after more than 1/3 of living Canadian people were born!
This has progressed greatly in recent decades but I am not sure this has really been achieved yet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 08:54 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,652,268 times
Reputation: 815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
This has progressed greatly in recent decades but I am not sure this has really been achieved yet.
When did the first Tim Hortons open in British Columbia? That might be a good date.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,958 posts, read 27,383,424 times
Reputation: 8612
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
The maple leaf as a symbol for canada dates back to its colonial pre-confederation days. I'd say world war 1 was a turning point for canada as a nation the battle of pashendale comes to mind as a nation defining period.

Canada declaring war on germany two weeks after britain did in ww2 was another turning point. It may not seem like much but not declaring war on a country automatically the same time Britain did was huge. Modern Canadian identity as we know it now developed in the late 60's-70's before that there was still strong ties to britain as sort of heir to anglo-saxon values and government in north america aside from qubec of course.
In Canadian historical lore this battle is usually referred to as the moment where Canadians became aware of their "nationhood":

Battle of Vimy Ridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Now, if you look at it more closely, what really happened at Vimy Ridge is that Canadians *of British origin* came to the realization that they weren't (or were no longer) simply a bunch of British people who were just living on some land across the Atlantic, but that they had become something different.

French-Canadians and aboriginals were not really involved in this "eureka" moment, as their identities had already been forged for quite a while - in the case of French Canadians, somewhere around the 1750s or 1760s, there was a realization that they weren't really "French", they were "CanadiEn". And of course, the identities of aboriginal groups in North America was and are millennial.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,544,693 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
In Canadian historical lore this battle is usually referred to as the moment where Canadians became aware of their "nationhood":

Battle of Vimy Ridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Now, if you look at it more closely, what really happened at Vimy Ridge is that Canadians *of British origin* came to the realization that they weren't (or were no longer) simply a bunch of British people who were just living on some land across the Atlantic, but that they had become something different.

French-Canadians and aboriginals were not really involved in this "eureka" moment, as their identities had already been forged for quite a while - in the case of French Canadians, somewhere around the 1750s or 1760s, there was a realization that they weren't really "French", they were "CanadiEn". And of course, the identities of aboriginal groups in North America was and are millennial.
I wonder how much of that was due to the relationships the French established with the natives. I've been reading a few books about reserves/reservations, and David Treuer, in Rez Life, brings it up how much better the French treated the natives than the British.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,958 posts, read 27,383,424 times
Reputation: 8612
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I wonder how much of that was due to the relationships the French established with the natives. I've been reading a few books about reserves/reservations, and David Treuer, in Rez Life, brings it up how much better the French treated the natives than the British.
This is not the first time I have heard this. One thing I can say is that there seems to have been a lot more mixing between the French and natives, than between the anglos and the natives. I don't know why that is, although it is also something you see with other groups (Spaniards, Portuguese) in the Americas who like the French could be called "Latin Catholics".

Anglo settlers seemed to have live more "apart" from the natives, and this is true in most places they colonized around I'd say. Of course, there still was some *mixing* (you know what I mean) with the indigenous populations on the part of the anglos, but it was obviously much less common and kept under wraps.

Another reason that French-Canadians developed their own identity and sense of place sooner is simply that they had been here longer. If you look at the inception of the French colonies (early 1600s) to the mid-1700s, you are talking about 150 years roughly.

The period from the Plains of Abraham (that marked the start of large-scale anglo settlement) to the Battle of Vimy Ridge is roughly the same time frame of 150 years.

It could be that 150 years is the benchmark time frame that a settler population needs to put down psychological roots in a new place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-16-2012, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,602 posts, read 11,093,754 times
Reputation: 10316
Here are some milestones:

Responsible Government - 1849
Dominion of Canada - 1867
Canada Represented at the Paris Peace Conference - 1919
Statute of Westminster - 1931
End of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council - 1949
Patriation of the Constitution - 1982
Team Canada beats Team USA - 2002 and 2010

Allow me to edit...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top