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Old 02-09-2013, 01:01 AM
 
369 posts, read 799,502 times
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In the US for sure.

Canada emphasizes on multiculturalism and diversity (that is, to be tolerant of cultural, ethnic and religious differences). So, immigrants would feel less pressurized in having to follow the Canadian values and identity.


While the US is also pretty diverse, they emphasize more on the American way of life and thinking.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
It does say something about assimilation when this man has been in Canada for 6 generations and he is still not of mixed ancestry......
Even if the guy is still 100% ethnically Japanese that does not mean he cannot be culturally Canadian and totally assimilated, and know nothing of the Japanese language, culture, cuisine, etc.

And in any event, he did not say anything about this guy not being of mixed ancestry. He could have some other races mixed in there but still be predominantly of Japanese origin.
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Old 06-06-2013, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
939 posts, read 1,260,545 times
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They definitely assimilate more in the U.S. than in Canada. Look at the Jewish community, for example. In the U.S., most Jews outside of the NYC area are secular and only go to synagogue on the High Holidays, and are pretty assimilated liberal people. In Canada, Jews are much less secular and have a strong Jewish religious and ethnic identity. They tend to be very Zionist and pro-Israel, and less uniformly liberal in politics. If I recall correctly, a quarter of people to immigrate to Israel from North America are Canadian, despite less than 10% of North American Jews being Canadian.

In America, there's a bigger trend to associate based on race than by nationality. As I'm half-Vietnamese, I felt welcomed by most Asian-Americans in the U.S., but when I was living in Canada, I noticed that the Vietnamese didn't hang out with the Japanese or the Filipinos, etc. and sought to maintain more of the Old Country culture.

The biggest exception to this rule is with Hispanics in the U.S. The majority of Hispanic immigrants are illegal and have no way of becoming a legal resident / citizen, and thus cannot assimilate. It makes no sense to go out on a limb and integrate with a population who doesn't understand that you can't get a drivers license, a bank account, or regular job and can't do anything about it other than go back to Mexico. Canada has a relatively small illegal immigrant population so it's managed to avoid this demographic crisis.

Last edited by usuario; 06-06-2013 at 12:11 PM..
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Old 06-06-2013, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,811 posts, read 4,431,836 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
The biggest exception to this rule is with Hispanics in the U.S. The majority of Hispanic immigrants are illegal and have no way of becoming a legal resident / citizen, and thus cannot assimilate. It makes no sense to go out on a limb and integrate with a population who doesn't understand that you can't get a drivers license, a bank account, or regular job and can't do anything about it other than go back to Mexico. Canada has a relatively small illegal immigrant population so it's managed to avoid this demographic crisis.
Thats false, Most hispanics are NOT illegal in the U.S.
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Old 06-06-2013, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Canada
196 posts, read 342,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by usuario View Post
In America, there's a bigger trend to associate based on race than by nationality. As I'm half-Vietnamese, I felt welcomed by most Asian-Americans in the U.S., but when I was living in Canada, I noticed that the Vietnamese didn't hang out with the Japanese or the Filipinos, etc. and sought to maintain more of the Old Country culture.
This is true to some extent, but changes with every generation.

I've observed many of the next generation (the children of the immigrants, in many cases the first born Canadian generation) hanging out with each other and associating more. With each generation, each becomes more Canadian and integrated, and the "old country" divides seem to go away.

And of course, each generation adapts the Canadian variant of American culture, as no nation influences Canada's culture as much as America.

Really no different than in 1900 when the Poles and Ukranians wouldn't mix with the French and English. Today, all these groups are Canadian, as will be all the recent immigrants in another generation.

And to the OP's original post, immigrants assimilate more into the US, as what you were is no longer what you are now, American. In Canadian multiculturalism, you are always encouraged to become Canadian, but not at the expense of your culture and traditions. Keep as much or as little as you like.
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Old 06-06-2013, 04:01 PM
 
2,816 posts, read 5,383,911 times
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Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Thats false, Most hispanics are NOT illegal in the U.S.
Another Asian doing his "We're not like those other dirty minorities" routine.
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Old 06-06-2013, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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There is a Muslim family that lives not far from me.
I would rather have immigrants for neighbors instead of lefty atheists.
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Old 06-06-2013, 05:04 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
1,473 posts, read 1,962,250 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
There is a Muslim family that lives not far from me.
I would rather have immigrants for neighbors instead of lefty atheists.
Why does everything have to be about "rather", rather than just accepting everyone equally?
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Old 06-06-2013, 05:27 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
Another Asian doing his "We're not like those other dirty minorities" routine.
That appears to be the case.
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Old 06-07-2013, 05:20 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,003,720 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScooterMcTavish View Post
And to the OP's original post, immigrants assimilate more into the US, as what you were is no longer what you are now, American. In Canadian multiculturalism, you are always encouraged to become Canadian, but not at the expense of your culture and traditions. Keep as much or as little as you like.
The textbook version of each countries stance on assimilation is exactly as you wrote. The Melting Pot vs Multiculturalism. In reality though, they seem to have the same end result for the most part. Being a "double immigrant" myself and having emigrated to both the US and Canada, I see no difference between the countries when it comes to expressing ones culture. Both Canadian and American cities have vibrant ethnic enclaves where you could spend entire days not speaking English (or French).

The US does a better job assimilating immigrants into the workforce though. The credentialing process for foreign trained and educated immigrants is more streamlined in the US, which allows many immigrants to hit the job market and use their skills faster than in Canada. Also the ceiling for what immigrants can attain in the US seems higher than in Canada. A good example is a look at the Fortune 500 list. 40% of the companies on that list were started by immigrants.

Overall though these are two of the best countries for someone to emigrate, the freedom to keep ones culture and assimilate into daily life is prevalent in both.
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