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Old 09-24-2013, 10:27 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,255 posts, read 6,591,773 times
Reputation: 14273

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
Yes it's different. No I don't do meth. Just call me Heisenberg.

KD is a staple of childhood/university education
50 years later and it's still a staple for me. I love KD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ausmage View Post
um there are 11 million illegals in the US so per-capita that's like 10 times as much as Canada
You're right, USA has 10 times as many per capita. I had done the math backwards. I guess Canada must be 10 times less desireable to illegals. Maybe because it's colder and it doesn't provide as many freebies. And not many Canadians would be willing to risk hiring illegals.

.

 
Old 09-25-2013, 02:03 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,541,240 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
I dont eat Kraft Mac and cheese(Dinner) but when i make it for the kids the difference they notice is the American cheese powder is white while the Canadian powder is yellow ,to them it makes a big enough difference in taste that they wont eat the American product on those times they are subjected to it, usually on camping excursions stateside/
The image links Mouldy Old Schmo posted showed yellow mac and cheese on the box. I've never understood the attraction of macaroni and cheese in any way, shape or form, even when I was a kid. I've tasted it of course, but I guess we must not have liked it or we would have had it more than once when we were kids.

I once thought maybe it would taste better if I made it from scratch but I still don't like it. Although I would be curious now to taste American Kraft macaroni and cheese and see what kind of a difference there is. My imagination fails me on that point.
 
Old 09-25-2013, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,175 posts, read 1,754,272 times
Reputation: 2642
Default Kd

Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
The image links Mouldy Old Schmo posted showed yellow mac and cheese on the box. I've never understood the attraction of macaroni and cheese in any way, shape or form, even when I was a kid. I've tasted it of course, but I guess we must not have liked it or we would have had it more than once when we were kids.
I've never understood the attraction we Canadians are supposed to have towards KD. I've always hated it. On the rare occasions when a friend has served it, I've hidden it under ketchup, black pepper, and so on. I've eaten it, sure; but never willingly.

Another Canadian dish I do not understand is poutine. Seriously, if I eat that, I'll die on the spot. Just thinkinng about it, my arteries are hardening.
 
Old 09-25-2013, 05:39 AM
 
Location: Back & Forth
210 posts, read 635,208 times
Reputation: 401
Quote:
Originally Posted by quebon View Post
What do you mean by "everything else"?
What I meant is everything else in Canada is better for us:
- Education
- Health Care
- Economy
- Gov't
- Network of friends /Social conversations tend to be have a more world view.
 
Old 09-25-2013, 05:55 AM
 
34,394 posts, read 41,499,470 times
Reputation: 29869
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I once thought maybe it would taste better if I made it from scratch but I still don't like it. Although I would be curious now to taste American Kraft macaroni and cheese and see what kind of a difference there is. My imagination fails me on that point.
My kids say the American product is inedible.. You'll have to try them both and come to your own conclusions, While the stuff in the box i would consider last resort survival food many restaurants in the USA and to a lesser degree Canada go to great lengths to make a more gourmet style of Mac and cheese.
 
Old 09-25-2013, 06:06 AM
 
Location: London, UK
3,458 posts, read 4,010,720 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
The image links Mouldy Old Schmo posted showed yellow mac and cheese on the box. I've never understood the attraction of macaroni and cheese in any way, shape or form, even when I was a kid. I've tasted it of course, but I guess we must not have liked it or we would have had it more than once when we were kids.

I once thought maybe it would taste better if I made it from scratch but I still don't like it. Although I would be curious now to taste American Kraft macaroni and cheese and see what kind of a difference there is. My imagination fails me on that point.
When I first immigrated to Canada (Toronto) as a kid I had no idea what Kraft Dinner was but quickly heard about this magical food from everyone's childhood. We never had the stuff in the house but I had a chance to try it at a friends house one afternoon after school, he loved it of course but I had to hold my nose to hold it down (I am a good guest and wont insult your food to your face ever) Just the taste of the processed cheese was gross to me and still is to this day. I have no idea how American Kraft Dinner tastes because I refuse to buy it, so cant compare.

Now my wife's Trinidadian Macaroni Pie or some awesome southern Mac n Cheese made with real ingredients? Now thats something I can eat regularly.
 
Old 09-25-2013, 08:15 AM
 
18,282 posts, read 10,383,572 times
Reputation: 13350
Quote:
Originally Posted by edwardsyzzurphands View Post
When I first immigrated to Canada (Toronto) as a kid I had no idea what Kraft Dinner was but quickly heard about this magical food from everyone's childhood. We never had the stuff in the house but I had a chance to try it at a friends house one afternoon after school, he loved it of course but I had to hold my nose to hold it down (I am a good guest and wont insult your food to your face ever) Just the taste of the processed cheese was gross to me and still is to this day. I have no idea how American Kraft Dinner tastes because I refuse to buy it, so cant compare.

Now my wife's Trinidadian Macaroni Pie or some awesome southern Mac n Cheese made with real ingredients? Now thats something I can eat regularly.
I think "most" of us of senior vintage remember vividly when schools first instituted a cafeteria function without a multiple choice menue and the very first thing to be summarily compromised and degraded by cafeteria staff was the macaroni and cheese Kraft dinner mix. Watching your friendly grinning staffer trying to get the stuff to fall off the serving spoon onto your plate was tantamount to waiting for a bus in the rain. One had no problem making the connection to that gelatinous glob working it's inexorable but hesitant way through your bowels.
 
Old 09-25-2013, 09:27 AM
 
34,394 posts, read 41,499,470 times
Reputation: 29869
Digging around to find some closure on the debate i tripped over this interesting site.
Canadian Perspective: KD aka Kraft Dinner - Canadian vs American
And if you need an excuse not to eat this stuff .
http://thenakedlabel.com/blog/2013/0...e-coloring-is/
 
Old 09-25-2013, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Montreal, QC
60 posts, read 67,361 times
Reputation: 63
Quote:
Originally Posted by ScooterMcTavish View Post
This one made me actually chuckle out loud.

Interesting, because I always equated the term "ex-pat" or expatriate as someone who is living in a different country due to choice. By the title of the thread (Why do Canadians move to the US?), I would suggest that those who move to the US have a choice if they wish to do so. This would also include the choice of returning to Canada if they so chose.

This is markedly different than a refugee (who is seeking "refuge" from something, and cannot return from where they came), or immigrant, which suggests someone who is going to a different country on a permanent basis, with the intent of seeking a new life, and new citizenship.

Certainly a Canadian ex-pat can move to the US, then become an immigrant who seeks US citizenship. I know a number of people who have. However, I also know ex-pats who have gone to the US, plan on staying there long-term, yet still would identify as Canadian. I would not consider this an immigrant.

Funny how a discussion on motivations in moving to the US becomes an discussion of semantics. Can't say that C-D forums are not educational.
True we're talking about expats/immigrants and Kraft dinner lol

Refugees are only a small minority of the migrant population. Immigrants are here by choice as well. Just like Canadians who go to the USA, other immigrants leave their native country to go elsewhere by choice. In reality, people can be expats and immigrants at the same time, but my issue is with the way people actually use these terms. Using the term expat is really a form of snobbery. A good chunk of Canadians and people from the UK who have been out of their respective countries really do not think of themselves as immigrants and continuously refer to themselves as expats even after 35 years of living in a foreign country. If we're going to use length of intended stay as a metric, then the only "true" expats would be people who are sent to foreign places for a limited amount of time (UN workers, etc.).

Anyway I only brought this up because I believe that we have this subsconscious notion of labelling ourselves as expats sometimes when we really are immigrants. And I have an anecdote which is pretty funny that will make people realize how right my assumption is. I have a friend who moved to Canada as a child from the Middle East, maybe at 5 years old, so he was pretty much raised here. But in high school (we had a very high proportion of ethnic/immigrants maybe at 90%) we all use to joke and talk about how certain ethnic cultures are very similar and say stuff like "immigrants 4 life" etc and . I myself am not an immigrant because I was born here, but I am very true to my roots and can be more "immigranty" than people who weren't born here. Anyway, recently he moved to Dubai for a job a opportunity and posted on Facebook about "living the life of an expat". So that is what I meant it's somehow ingrained in our brains as Canadians that whenever we leave our country we are always expats no matter what.
 
Old 09-25-2013, 11:48 PM
 
1,691 posts, read 1,657,518 times
Reputation: 1168
For me it was an accident of life. I did a PhD in the US and then life happened. One of the biggest reasons I don't plan on returning to Canada is the weather. Even here in central Ohio it's considerably warmer than just a few hours north in Ontario.

My family asks me how I can live here, but as I explain to them, when you get down to living your day to day life - work, school, commute, shopping, etc., it doesn't really matter where you live.
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