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Old 07-18-2012, 08:59 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Does Vancouver have a legit French speaking community outside of Quebecois who have moved there?
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Old 07-18-2012, 10:18 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Is the trend for Quebeckers to become increasingly multilingual?
Comments from your old uncle at the tavern aside, the general trend for knowledge of English is ticking upwards a few percentage points during every five-year census period. It has risen from about 25% in 1970 to over 35% today and is moving in on 40% now.
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Old 07-18-2012, 10:21 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
Does Vancouver have a legit French speaking community outside of Quebecois who have moved there?
There was a historic francophone neighbourhood (very small) called Maillardville that existed a century ago maybe, but it has all but disappeared and I doubt there are any French speakers left from that settlement. BC is actually the only province from which I have never met someone from an established francophone family.

So the francophone community there is mostly people from Quebec, francophones from the other provinces, and also some European francophones and people from Africa and the Middle East. Almost all of them fairly recent arrivals.
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Old 07-18-2012, 10:52 PM
 
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Indeed. Judging from the fact that L’école secondaire Jules-Verne first opened its school in 2008, and the French International School of Vancouver opened its doors in 1997.
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Old 07-18-2012, 11:18 PM
 
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I retract what I'd just wrote above. French schools existed for francophone families in British Columbia in the 1800s and 1900s.
Conseil Scolaire Francophone

However, it never occurred to me to dig in to others' family history. Perhaps, I shall do that the next time if I can get away with it.
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Old 07-18-2012, 11:33 PM
 
Location: Canada
3,675 posts, read 3,556,340 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougie86 View Post
I retract what I'd just wrote above. French schools existed for francophone families in British Columbia in the 1800s and 1900s.
Conseil Scolaire Francophone

However, it never occurred to me to dig in to others' family history. Perhaps, I shall do that the next time if I can get away with it.
Yeah, but it isn't true that most of this community has assimilated and that most of the current Francophone community is composed of transplants from other parts of Canada and the wider world?
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Old 07-19-2012, 02:44 AM
 
20,356 posts, read 16,646,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Comments from your old uncle at the tavern aside, the general trend for knowledge of English is ticking upwards a few percentage points during every five-year census period. It has risen from about 25% in 1970 to over 35% today and is moving in on 40% now.
Kind of a vague phrase,"the general trend for knowledge of English" Does that mean 40% of Francophones are learning English?And if so where exactly are they acquiring these skills in English?as it certainly isnt in Quebec public school system where even speaking English between classes is forbidden.
I cant really comment further until you clarify what is meant by "the general trend for knowledge of English"As from my Anglo perspective i'm not seeing any trend for an increased knowledge of English in fact quite the opposite is the general trend.

Last edited by jambo101; 07-19-2012 at 02:53 AM..
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Old 07-19-2012, 07:51 AM
 
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I am an Anglophone living in rural Quebec but I am originally from Vancouver.

There are sporadic Francophone families in Vancouver (non-Quebecois) but they are so integrated into society that you wouldn't know unless you asked. British Columbia has two types of "French" schools: French immersion for Anglophone students who wish to learn in French, and Francophone schools for children with at least one Francophone parent. Immersion schools teach children in French, while learning French. Francophone schools operate in the French language and do not teach French as a second language but as the first (ie. they study French literature rather than from an FSL perspective). The farthest outside Vancouver that I've seen an actual Francophone school is in Langley which is about a 45 minute drive.

In Vancouver itself, you'll find a tiny community of Francophones from various countries (France, Belgium, Africa, etc) but you'd find it very difficult to even know they were Francophone. My husband is Quebecois and had a few friends from France in the area but again, so bilingual you wouldn't know. Most assume they are from Quebec anyways. There are a lot of Quebecois in Vancouver, including a sizable portion of the homeless community due to weather. Lots of youth wanting to learn English, and plenty of RCMP officers, particularly in national parks areas/tourist areas.
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Old 07-19-2012, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
4,954 posts, read 3,071,023 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Comments from your old uncle at the tavern aside, the general trend for knowledge of English is ticking upwards a few percentage points during every five-year census period. It has risen from about 25% in 1970 to over 35% today and is moving in on 40% now.
I have an uncle who managed The Red Fox Lounge at the Holiday Inn in Clarksdale, MS years ago, but to my knowledge he never complained about people from Quebec for any reason.
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Old 07-19-2012, 11:33 AM
 
20,356 posts, read 16,646,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I have an uncle who managed The Red Fox Lounge at the Holiday Inn in Clarksdale, MS years ago, but to my knowledge he never complained about people from Quebec for any reason.
Was Clarksdale, MS a major Quebecois destination?
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