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Old 07-13-2012, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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I get the impression that a lot of you folks are city slickers who think a small town is one with 100,000 people!
With that off my chest, I wonder if there are many Canadian rural communities whose glory days are long gone, with jobs and young people moving away.
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Old 07-13-2012, 11:06 AM
 
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Quite a few towns across Canada were dependent on one industry,when that industry shut down or left the town usually followed suit.Also many communities that were based around farms arent what they once were as many super agro enterprises bought up most of the land leaving the family farm and related community a pale shadow of days past as most moved away.
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Old 07-13-2012, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Canada
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The fishing villages of Newfoundland, the Maritimes and North Eastern Quebec have really faced hard times and a steep decline since the collapse of the fisheries in that region, it's very sad. But I wouldn't say rural Canada has declined exactly. Where resource extraction is the main industry, they've done pretty well. And there are some growing, successful rural communities in the more fertile lands where you can grow high value agricultural products, like wine, fruit, or shellfish (Vancouver Island, The Okanagan and the Niagara peninsula come to mind). So it depends on where you`re at. If you`ve got industry in your town, like an aluminium plant, you`ll generally do pretty well to.
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Old 07-13-2012, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I get the impression that a lot of you folks are city slickers who think a small town is one with 100,000 people!
.
I may be a city slicker by most definitions but I was born in a small town and both my parents are from villages of less than 500 people, where i still have most of my relatives.

As for the future of rural Canada it is highly variable as BIMBAM said. Some places are actually on the rebound after decades of decline thanks to Internet access allowing young people to stay put and run businesses, and also with retirees or semi-retirees returning home or seeking a slower pace.

In others the decline appears to be irreversible though.
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Old 07-13-2012, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Canada
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I think with relatively few cities in Canada, a city with a 100,000 is a sizable Canadian city.

There is no decline in the small towns in my area - they are growing, largely due to immigrants from Germany who in turn, immigrated from Russia, and people are not moving out of the small towns either.

I am not a city slicker. I live on a farm near a town of about 250 (so they say. That may be counting the dogs).
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Old 07-13-2012, 07:02 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
I get the impression that a lot of you folks are city slickers who think a small town is one with 100,000 people!
With that off my chest, I wonder if there are many Canadian rural communities whose glory days are long gone, with jobs and young people moving away.
I don't think so. There are 34,241 settlements, villages, towns and cities in Canada and the population of Canada is 34,856,795. Out of the 100 largest towns and cities in Canada the populations range between 23,589 (considered a small city) to 5,132,794 (the largest city). That still leaves 34,141 communities that have a population of approximately 23,000 or less. Considering the overall population of Canada and the inhabitable territory that's a lot of small population communities spread out over the country, most of which are isolated or are part of rural satellites a fair distance away from larger urban centers.

.
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Old 07-13-2012, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
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I'd like to think I'm not obsolete. I'm still (mostly) functional.

Since we're all posting our anti-city slicker credentials: I come from a ranching background in SW Saskatchewan, and still do that part time. The rest of the time I live in a city (less than 100,000 people) to facilitate my other job.
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Old 07-13-2012, 08:47 PM
 
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100,000 population gives a small town.
between 100,000-500,000 are just bigger towns, such as Barrie, ON, Victoria, BC.

A huge city has more than 10M people (metro);
A big city has more than 5M; Toronto is one, but on the small side
A medium sized city has 1-5M; Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa and Calgary are perfect examples.
A small city has 500K-1M; Quebec City, London, ON etc

I have lived in four cities so far and Toronto is the smallest. The other three have 8M (hometown), 23M and 18M respectively). This is probably why I never see the "congestion" and "crowd" people keep talking about in Toronto. For me, Toronto is pretty quiet. A good sized city without too much noise and hustle bustle. You only see real city life in a very small part of this place.

The future of the world belongs to large and dense cities. The small areas never had their "glory days" and will only decline further. How many 20 something well educated people would want to stick with something like Charlottetown or Halifax?
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Old 07-13-2012, 09:51 PM
 
Location: CFL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
100,000 population gives a small town.
between 100,000-500,000 are just bigger towns, such as Barrie, ON, Victoria, BC.

A huge city has more than 10M people (metro);
A big city has more than 5M; Toronto is one, but on the small side
A medium sized city has 1-5M; Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa and Calgary are perfect examples.
A small city has 500K-1M; Quebec City, London, ON etc

I have lived in four cities so far and Toronto is the smallest. The other three have 8M (hometown), 23M and 18M respectively). This is probably why I never see the "congestion" and "crowd" people keep talking about in Toronto. For me, Toronto is pretty quiet. A good sized city without too much noise and hustle bustle. You only see real city life in a very small part of this place.

The future of the world belongs to large and dense cities. The small areas never had their "glory days" and will only decline further. How many 20 something well educated people would want to stick with something like Charlottetown or Halifax?
Are these numbers your own definitions??

Canada has specific numbers that vary by province and don't seems to match yours. List of cities in Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
List of towns in Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 07-14-2012, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,550 posts, read 9,429,171 times
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It is my impression that Canada is more urbanized than the U.S. - that is, a greater percentage of its population lives in urban areas, but I could be wrong. I guess my impression comes from the impression that most famous Canadians are from Toronto, Montreal, or Vancover.
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