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View Poll Results: Has Canada become more or less American over time?
Canada is becoming less American compared to several decades ago 15 25.86%
Canada has stayed about the same amount different from America 14 24.14%
Canada is more American than it was a few decades ago 29 50.00%
Voters: 58. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-25-2012, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
True. So Canadian music and film isn't really popular in Canada?
Canadian music more so than Canadian film and television, partially because CRTC says minimum 25-40% of content on Canadian radios must be Canadian content, and partially because music requires little capital and people love their hometown acts, so Canadian musicians aren't at so much of a disadvantage. Sometime radio stations choose to play more than the minimum required, and then of course there's the CBC/Radio Canada. The Canadian music scene is very strong, but the artists often play within the same genres American bands would since genres rarely keep to within a country's borders. I'd say Canadian film and television, on the other hand, only have something like 5 to 10% market share in the English market. We've had some really successful franchises, but because of the capital involved with something like that Canadian shows were rarely the same quality as American programs, simply because they were marketing to a much smaller demographic and so could never be as profitable. Many Canadian shows try to get around that by de-emphasizing their Canadian-ness in the hopes of being picked up by US networks, so that they'll be able to be of a similar quality. Lost Girl, recently, has pulled this off. But of course, when one does that, it's only Canadian in subtle ways and doesn't really count. Canada has lots of really great independent film, partially fueld by government tax breaks to try and turn the current situation around, but people still mostly watch the big hollywood blockbusters because that's what the movie theatres play and, let's be honest, they can be quite the spectacle.
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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I guess one of the primary issues uniting Canadians of all political stripes is that they don't want to be like the United States.
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Old 07-25-2012, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
10,174 posts, read 11,148,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Canadian music more so than Canadian film and television, partially because CRTC says minimum 25-40% of content on Canadian radios must be Canadian content, and partially because music requires little capital and people love their hometown acts, so Canadian musicians aren't at so much of a disadvantage. Sometime radio stations choose to play more than the minimum required, and then of course there's the CBC/Radio Canada. The Canadian music scene is very strong, but the artists often play within the same genres American bands would since genres rarely keep to within a country's borders. I'd say Canadian film and television, on the other hand, only have something like 5 to 10% market share in the English market. We've had some really successful franchises, but because of the capital involved with something like that Canadian shows were rarely the same quality as American programs, simply because they were marketing to a much smaller demographic and so could never be as profitable. Many Canadian shows try to get around that by de-emphasizing their Canadian-ness in the hopes of being picked up by US networks, so that they'll be able to be of a similar quality. Lost Girl, recently, has pulled this off. But of course, when one does that, it's only Canadian in subtle ways and doesn't really count. Canada has lots of really great independent film, partially fueld by government tax breaks to try and turn the current situation around, but people still mostly watch the big hollywood blockbusters because that's what the movie theatres play and, let's be honest, they can be quite the spectacle.
Good point about popular music (especially rock). It's the one area of mainstream culture where there really is something that could be called distinctively Canadian that is going on.
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Old 07-25-2012, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Toronto
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Well, it might seem superficial but it seems like in terms of businesses/products, there are a lot more American chains coming in, out-competing, buying or replacing Canadian chains even in the past decade or two, or even just in the past few years. For example, Target vs. Zellers or Subway vs. Mr. Sub. I say it might be rather superficial because often time there isn't anything especially different about what people want to buy in the new chain versus the old one, but people still pay lip-service to how such-and-such is Canadian-owned, and what a shame it was that it was replaced by another bigshot chain, owned by an American instead (and all the while welcoming and buying the new chain's products anyways).

One thing I do notice, despite being a young man, is that young people or teens I notice today have elements of teen or school culture that exist now that didn't even seem that prominent even a decade or two ago (that seem to be American pop culture/MTV-influenced, though I can't be sure -- maybe people just like to complain that American influence is everywhere). For example, I was noting to myself this year how much it stood out to me that in May/June there was a lot more advertising at the mall about the high school prom from fashion/clothing stores. I noticed signs/images about "prom" everywhere and noticed even a few years back I didn't notice so much emphasis on it. Things like spring break, prom etc. seem way more celebrated in US teen/school culture than Canadian culture (yes it does exist in Canada but it feels really toned-down relative to US culture) and it seems like these things are even spreading north (since I'm in Toronto, I'm probably noticing it first in the big ads/malls of the city etc.).
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Old 07-25-2012, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Canada
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It's true, grad dances are becoming much more like American proms due to American media influence, and conventions with things like tipping, as mentioned in another thread, are also converging. These are the reasons I say we are becoming Americanized, despite being fairly different politically.
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Old 07-26-2012, 04:51 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 1,314,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
Well, it might seem superficial but it seems like in terms of businesses/products, there are a lot more American chains coming in, out-competing, buying or replacing Canadian chains even in the past decade or two, or even just in the past few years. For example, Target vs. Zellers or Subway vs. Mr. Sub. I say it might be rather superficial because often time there isn't anything especially different about what people want to buy in the new chain versus the old one, but people still pay lip-service to how such-and-such is Canadian-owned, and what a shame it was that it was replaced by another bigshot chain, owned by an American instead (and all the while welcoming and buying the new chain's products anyways).

One thing I do notice, despite being a young man, is that young people or teens I notice today have elements of teen or school culture that exist now that didn't even seem that prominent even a decade or two ago (that seem to be American pop culture/MTV-influenced, though I can't be sure -- maybe people just like to complain that American influence is everywhere). For example, I was noting to myself this year how much it stood out to me that in May/June there was a lot more advertising at the mall about the high school prom from fashion/clothing stores. I noticed signs/images about "prom" everywhere and noticed even a few years back I didn't notice so much emphasis on it. Things like spring break, prom etc. seem way more celebrated in US teen/school culture than Canadian culture (yes it does exist in Canada but it feels really toned-down relative to US culture) and it seems like these things are even spreading north (since I'm in Toronto, I'm probably noticing it first in the big ads/malls of the city etc.).
Interesting. I think it's probably because of reality television shows on MTV and such, think My Super Sweet Sixteen and so on.
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Old 07-26-2012, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Can you be a dyed-in-the-wool Tory and still resent American influence?
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Old 07-28-2012, 09:15 AM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Can you be a dyed-in-the-wool Tory and still resent American influence?

What is a Tory?
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Old 07-28-2012, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Quote:
Originally Posted by callmemaybe View Post
What is a Tory?

That is the nickname for a member or supporter of the Conservative Party.
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Urban Coastal California
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i think the younger generation is increasingly more Americanized. There are many US subcultures though (preppy/ cheerleader-Varsity/ African-American etc) that stay within the borders and thus, you dont really see there in the younger ppl sphere or "style"
The older people are noticeably different from the US counterparts.

I've spent sufficient time in Canada and it has a different feeling, imo people also look a little different (there are certain "looks" you see in Canada that you dont really see in the US, and vice versa). The older people tend to look much more "British"...the people in general tend to look a little earthier. I people-watch alot.

Toronto and Vancouver are different parts of the country but they have a collective "feeling" that say Vancouver and Seattle do not have despite being closer together. No matter what, nationality ties things together. Hard to describe..if you're perceptive and have spent lots of time in both countries, than you'd know what I mean.
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