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Old 09-01-2012, 03:55 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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As opposed to just British or French or American or whatever? When did the people of Canada begin to view themselves as being Canadians as opposed to just colonists?
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Old 09-01-2012, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Well, as I've heard you say in another comment so I won't get too into it, the word "Canadien" used to refer exclusively to French speaking Canadians with roots in Upper and Lower Canada, so even Acadians and Metis didn't identify as Canadian. The roots of English Canadian culture were there long before people's imagined community and self-identity switched over from being primarily British people of the British Empire to being Canadians. I believe that the big "hey wow, look, we're Canadian people" moment was the battle of Vimy Ridge, and World War One in general. That was really the birth of Canada as an independent identity and state.
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Old 09-01-2012, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
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It never happened. Right after we felt British, we all got televisions and began to feel American.
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Old 09-01-2012, 09:19 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zortation View Post
It never happened. Right after we felt British, we all got televisions and began to feel American.
I disagree. I feel different when I'm in Canada compared to when I'm at home. Then again, I feel even more different when I'm in the eastern US.
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Old 09-01-2012, 09:32 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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French Canadians were already Canadian (Canadien actually) rather than French by the 1750s.
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Old 09-01-2012, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zortation View Post
It never happened. Right after we felt British, we all got televisions and began to feel American.
I agree. I was just down in Seattle and people always say it's so much like Vancouver. It isn't, it reminded me alot of other big American cities I've been to like New York and San Fancisco. And that's because of American culture, which really is quite a different despite superficial similarities. A million little details add up.
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Old 09-01-2012, 09:49 PM
 
Location: The heart of Cascadia
1,328 posts, read 2,651,495 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
I agree. I was just down in Seattle and people always say it's so much like Vancouver. It isn't, it reminded me alot of other big American cities I've been to like New York and San Fancisco. And that's because of American culture, which really is quite a different despite superficial similarities. A million little details add up.
Seattle reminds me of Buffalo, though much nicer. I do think Portland kinda has somewhat of a Canadian feel, not quite though. It doesn't really feel that American or that Canadian.
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Old 09-02-2012, 05:22 PM
 
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Im pretty sure soon as a person was born here they thought they were from that place. People are overly obsessed with this supernational stuff, british, american, or canadian. Reality was before mass communication where you were from was who you were.

Im a newfoundlander and Im sure 2-300 years ago my ancestors were still newfoundlanders.
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Old 09-06-2012, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
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Speaking as a Canadian, whose ancestors came to Ontario over 200 years ago, from Ireland, I think that the pivotal point was the First World War.

Every one of the 800,000 thousand men who volunteered to serve in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, wore a "Canada " shoulder flash, on their uniform tunic, and a Maple Leaf cap badge, on their issue hat, with their individual battalion number below the Male Leaf.

At the end of that costly war..... Canada was among the nations who signed the treaty of surender, as a
Independant Nation,......... NOT a colony of Great Britain.

My Dad was one of that 800,000 strong group, as a skinny ( 127 lbs ) underage 16 year old. He survived the war, although he was wounded three times, and was stone deaf in his right ear ( he was a Vickers Machine gunner ) . He was VERY proud that he was a "VIMY MAN ", who had fought at that battle, in 1917, as a part of the "all Canadian " 1st Army.

Jim B

Toronto.
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Old 09-06-2012, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,949 posts, read 27,371,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by canadian citizen View Post
Speaking as a Canadian, whose ancestors came to Ontario over 200 years ago, from Ireland, I think that the pivotal point was the First World War.

Every one of the 800,000 thousand men who volunteered to serve in the Canadian Expeditionary Force, wore a "Canada " shoulder flash, on their uniform tunic, and a Maple Leaf cap badge, on their issue hat, with their individual battalion number below the Male Leaf.

At the end of that costly war..... Canada was among the nations who signed the treaty of surender, as a
Independant Nation,......... NOT a colony of Great Britain.

My Dad was one of that 800,000 strong group, as a skinny ( 127 lbs ) underage 16 year old. He survived the war, although he was wounded three times, and was stone deaf in his right ear ( he was a Vickers Machine gunner ) . He was VERY proud that he was a "VIMY MAN ", who had fought at that battle, in 1917, as a part of the "all Canadian " 1st Army.

Jim B

Toronto.
Great story.
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