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Old 09-16-2012, 07:50 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Both seem to have a similar/history culture...the Maritimes are full of 'news' as well, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and although not part of the Maritimes but the Atlantic provinces, NEWfoundland. Both seem to retain more English/Irish/Scottish culture than the rest of their respective countries, and similar love for seafood etc. I heard the accent in southwest New Brunswick is similar to Maine/Eastern MA. There's also a lot of French ancestry Maine, Vermont.etc, as there is in NB.

How would you compare the two as well? Are people in the Maritimes more friendly than New Englanders?
Are the two regions more similar to each other than they are to the US/Canada?
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Old 09-16-2012, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Both coasts
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there are similarities but i think the difference btwn New England & the Canadian Maritimes is greater than the difference between other border areas (like WA state vs BC for instance).

The northernmost New England states will have similarities, but the states like Connecticut and Mass. are uppity and rat-racey- quite a contrast to the Maritimes which I believe are considered down-to-earth even for Canadian standards (The New England states are among the most affluent within the US whereas the Maritimes provinces are among the least affluent within Canada).

So no, I would say it is noticeably different between the 2 regions
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Old 09-16-2012, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Canada
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They're culturally pretty different, and the accents aren't particularly similar between the two regions. I think it has to do with age, they've both been around so long that they've had time to diverge quite a bit. There's similarities, but New England is really the historical heart of the USA and it's very much connected to it and its history. The Maritimes also has a deep sense of history, but it's an entirely different one. The Maritimes is more British than New England by a mile (even when you factor in the older Acadian culture) in part because its rural and doesn't have a good economy.
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Old 09-16-2012, 11:32 PM
 
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Boston can be considered the capital of new england and halifax would be so for the maritimes but both those cities and their regions are pretty different aside from a few similarities.
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Old 09-17-2012, 03:57 AM
 
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There are aspects of the two that are exceptionally similar, but youd really have to cherry pick to group it together.


That ben affleck movie the town, felt like a movie that could of been made in st johns, ironically were called townies too.

But overall I`d say the ways in which we diverge based on our similarities is what seals the deal. Were both historical populations which has been said, we have had the longest time to diverge out of anywhere else in north america. Secondly atlantic canada`s population has been shaped by rural culture versus newengland, which is shaped by its urban corridor.
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Old 09-17-2012, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Sunnyside, Calgary
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There are definitely a lot of similarities including family ties. Before maritimers went to Toronto and Calgary for work, a lot moved to Boston. I have a bunch of cousins on both sides of my family in the Boston area.

Interestingly, one of the branches of the family tree went moved Ireland, to Boston, and then Cape Breton (it was a land with opportunity once!)
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Old 09-17-2012, 10:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeinalberta View Post
There are definitely a lot of similarities including family ties. Before maritimers went to Toronto and Calgary for work, a lot moved to Boston. I have a bunch of cousins on both sides of my family in the Boston area.

Interestingly, one of the branches of the family tree went moved Ireland, to Boston, and then Cape Breton (it was a land with opportunity once!)
I think in general, despite what you hear about the 'Americanization' of accents and business in Canada, the reality is Canada is diverging from the USA culturally and its ties with bordering US states are shrinking not growing. 50 years ago, NB probably had more ties to Boston than to Toronto, but now it probably doesn't.
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Old 09-17-2012, 10:28 PM
 
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^^^

I think that's an over-generalization. I wouldn't use the maritime regions as a reference for all of canada as the maritimes are a pretty unique cultural region of canada.

I still think there is an overlapping regionalization in north america between the different regions between canada and the us.


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Old 09-17-2012, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Obviously made by an American, probably from the east coast. Since when is a region with major cities like Calgary, Edmonton, Las Vegas and Salt Lake city empty? And why would you cut Saskatchewan in half and say that's the end of the breadbasket (and then include huge parts of the barren Canadian Shield in Ontario)? And just no, if the Maritimes aren't an extension of New England, then Newfoundland most definitely is not!

Haha, not to mention the absurdity of lumping the entirety of Central America into a region called "The Islands" and then ignoring Mexico for no reason!
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Old 09-17-2012, 11:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhundred View Post
^^^

I think that's an over-generalization. I wouldn't use the maritime regions as a reference for all of canada as the maritimes are a pretty unique cultural region of canada.

I still think there is an overlapping regionalization in north america between the different regions between canada and the us.

I think the Pacific Northwest is the only region that's truly shared by the US and Canada, the other regions are quite distinctly cut off at the border. Even the Canadian Prairies are quite different from Montana and North Dakota.
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