U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-13-2007, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Axarquía, Andalucía, Spain
2,940 posts, read 5,173,864 times
Reputation: 1694

Advertisements

Hey everyone, I was on the US thread too looking to see which country suited me best. Most people I know that have moved to Canada from the UK love it compared to some that have moved to the US and hate it.

Is there much of a difference between Canada and the US?

Im wanting a better quality of life, I like the Toronto area, particularly the "beaches" part.

I wouldn't like to live in a place that rains alot but has hot summers and winters.

The city doesn't have to be that big but as long as theres shops, bars etc

Im in the aviation industry but i was looking at getting into a career in wildlife, i,e a game warden.

I also dont want to live in a very expensive place where my income is lower.

Sorry for all these questions.


P.S I dont have a skill as such, but my partner is American. Would he be able to get work with having a HND in mechanical engineering?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-13-2007, 03:37 PM
 
58 posts, read 228,831 times
Reputation: 29
Where I live there is oppertunity for both industries you are in
It is very expensive here, but if you are moving here for an industry that is understaffed(which most are) many companies provide living allowance, sign on bonus, etc

I live in Fort McMurray alberta

Just be warned it is isolated and has shops but becouse it is so busy here expect to wait in line for everything

However if you are looking for above national average wages here is the place- if you have a trade as you do
the average income is 90k per year, many with more if you count all the bonus and living allowances
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2007, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Axarquía, Andalucía, Spain
2,940 posts, read 5,173,864 times
Reputation: 1694
Quote:
Originally Posted by albianstar View Post
Where I live there is oppertunity for both industries you are in
It is very expensive here, but if you are moving here for an industry that is understaffed(which most are) many companies provide living allowance, sign on bonus, etc

I live in Fort McMurray alberta

Just be warned it is isolated and has shops but becouse it is so busy here expect to wait in line for everything

However if you are looking for above national average wages here is the place- if you have a trade as you do
the average income is 90k per year, many with more if you count all the bonus and living allowances

Hi there, do you know how I would become a game warden? I dont have any degrees but I have higher education etc.

Kind regards
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2007, 01:31 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
1,049 posts, read 4,046,476 times
Reputation: 1024
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotslass View Post
Is there much of a difference between Canada and the US?
Is there much of a difference between Scotland and England? That's the question you're asking. Actually, no wait. You're asking, "Is there much of a difference between Ireland and England?"

The one thing I find ironic about your post is that you wish to work with wildlife, and yet you wish to work in Toronto. Toronto's about as urban and non-wildlife as it gets in Canada.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2007, 02:07 AM
 
Location: Axarquía, Andalucía, Spain
2,940 posts, read 5,173,864 times
Reputation: 1694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robynator View Post
Is there much of a difference between Scotland and England? That's the question you're asking. Actually, no wait. You're asking, "Is there much of a difference between Ireland and England?"

The one thing I find ironic about your post is that you wish to work with wildlife, and yet you wish to work in Toronto. Toronto's about as urban and non-wildlife as it gets in Canada.
Surely there must be rural parts outside Toronto?

I am currently an aircraft dispatcher, thats my primary experiance.

Canada and the US are very different in some ways, but which?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2007, 02:37 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
1,049 posts, read 4,046,476 times
Reputation: 1024
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scotslass View Post
Surely there must be rural parts outside Toronto?

I am currently an aircraft dispatcher, thats my primary experiance.

Canada and the US are very different in some ways, but which?
From my understanding, Toronto is surrounded by industrial/agricultural land, and hours outside of that you begin to enter more wilderness areas. If you go to Google Maps (Google Maps) and type in "Toronto, Ontario, Canada") and click on the "Hybrid" mode where it shows you both the road networks, place names *and* the satellite imagery... and if you zoom in and pan around on the map, you'll actually see what the landscape is really like. Toronto is a sprawling city surrounded by the most populated/developed land in Canada. It's the largest city in Canada. If you're looking for a smaller city experience, I would not choose Toronto.

As for the differences between Canada and the USA, when you're speaking of these two countries, it really makes more sense to think of them at regional levels, because there are cultural/historical/geographical/demographic differences between the USA's states and Canada's provinces. And Canada and the USA's similarities become more evident when you're looking at their regions. Toronto (located on the great lakes) has more in common with American cities like Chicago, which are also located on the great lakes. Canada's Atlantic provinces like Nova Scotia, have more in common with the USA's Atlantic states (like Maine) than it does with anywhere else. Canada's province on the Pacific, British Columbia, has more in common with the USA's states on the Pacific - Washington, Oregon, California... than it does with anywhere else in Canada. Canada's oil-producing, flat-prairie provinces like Alberta, have more in common with the oil-producing, flat-prairie states like Texas, than anywhere else.

As for differences, they're found in their beliefs, histories, politics, laws, demographics, etc. Superficially they appear similar, just like Scotland, England, and Ireland. But it's beneath the surface where they differ greatly.

Canada, for example, despite having vast areas of unpopulated space, is a very urban, multicultural country - the majority of Canada's population lives in cities/suburbs. The USA has 10 times the more population as Canada, but you have more people living in small towns there than in Canada.

The USA has a gun culture, Canada does not.

The USA has a huge bible belt and a so-called "religious right" where religion is central to every aspect of their lives (hence politicians pandering to this demographic). You'll get people thanking the lord, referring to Jesus, in mid conversation without batting an eye. You'll never ever get that in Canada.

The USA has a history of black slavery and institutionalized racism against blacks, which has polarized its demographics still to this day. You've got the population divided into, literally, blacks, whites, and all else. There are no two dominating racial group in Canada - they're spread across the board, although it hugely varies by city/province/territory.

Canada had institutionalized racism against its aboriginal and non-white populations (especially its Asian populations out west). The racist policies were taken out back after WWII and though some have never gotten the apology from the government, you don't have this dividing populations today. By this I mean, you don't have entire races holding grudges against other races today. Although Canada's treatment of its aboriginal populations is still atrocious. I don't know if this is better or worse in the USA.

American politics are hugely polarized - you're either conservative or liberal and it's dividing up the country. Canada has a multi-party parliamentary system.

Canada's more social "we all pitch in for everybody" and the USA's more capitalist "I work hard and only I should reap the benefits".

In Canada you're taxed higher. In the USA, you're not.

In the USA, patriotism takes on a whole new meaning - as a young kid you pledge your allegiance to your flag. Etc, etc. There is no such institutionalized nationalist patriotism in Canada. The American flag is everywhere - it's like a religious icon there. "God Bless America". You'll never see "God Bless Canada", ever.

There's no cheerleader/football culture in Canada like the kind shown in American movies, but there's hockey culture.

Mass generalizations, and I can go on and on, but this is just the beginning.

Last edited by Robynator; 10-14-2007 at 03:11 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2007, 02:50 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
1,049 posts, read 4,046,476 times
Reputation: 1024
Here's a quote from "silks" from another thread:

I've lived in both Canada and the U.S., and the main differences that I see are:

- The gun issue. In Canada, owning a gun is pretty much unheard of and totally unnecessary unless you're up to no good. In the U.S., there's a definite "gun culture" and a lot of people that think guns are "neat". There's a lot of "gun hobbyists". For somebody that grew up in Canada where guns are almost exclusively owned by hunters, guys I work with having gun collections (Magnums, Glocks, etc.) is an eye-opening experience and an obvious cultural difference.

- This is a huge generalization, but the American attitude is more "I should be able to do what I please, the government can't tell me what to do, ever", and the Canadian atttitude is, "It's OK for the government to regulate certain things, as long as it makes sense and is for the greater good". I find American society to be more individualistic in general, whereas Canadian society is more prepared to concede individual freedoms if they're in the best interests of everybody.

- LOTS more advertising in the U.S. I always laugh when I cross over from Detroit to Windsor, because there's mile after mile of billboards on I-75 (American side) but then when you get onto 401 (Canadian side) there's nothing.

- Canada is more laid-back, America is more hustle-and-bustle. There's LOTS of people in the U.S., lots going on, and plenty to do. Outside of Canada's major centers (Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, etc.) there are vast stretches of open space dotted with sleepy little towns. In most parts of the U.S., you can't drive more than an hour in any direction without hitting a fairly populated area.

- Religion isn't nearly as big a deal in Canada as it is in the U.S. (at least where I'm from in Southwestern Ontario). In fact, growing up I didn't know anybody that even went to church on Sundays. In the U.S., religion is a big, divisive topic.

- The military is a much bigger deal in the U.S. than in Canada. Growing up I didn't know anybody that had been in the Canadian army (and I grew up in a city of 300,000-plus), but since living in the U.S. I can name 10 people off the top of my head that have served, and unfortunately know a guy that died serving in the Middle East a couple of years ago. Big cultural difference there.

That's my 20 cents.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2007, 06:21 AM
 
1,039 posts, read 1,947,224 times
Reputation: 569
Toronto has lots of nature and wildlife along it's two major river valleys and there's a very large natural wilderness area in the Northeast corner of the city called Rouge Park.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2007, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Axarquía, Andalucía, Spain
2,940 posts, read 5,173,864 times
Reputation: 1694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robynator View Post
Here's a quote from "silks" from another thread:

I've lived in both Canada and the U.S., and the main differences that I see are:

- The gun issue. In Canada, owning a gun is pretty much unheard of and totally unnecessary unless you're up to no good. In the U.S., there's a definite "gun culture" and a lot of people that think guns are "neat". There's a lot of "gun hobbyists". For somebody that grew up in Canada where guns are almost exclusively owned by hunters, guys I work with having gun collections (Magnums, Glocks, etc.) is an eye-opening experience and an obvious cultural difference.

- This is a huge generalization, but the American attitude is more "I should be able to do what I please, the government can't tell me what to do, ever", and the Canadian atttitude is, "It's OK for the government to regulate certain things, as long as it makes sense and is for the greater good". I find American society to be more individualistic in general, whereas Canadian society is more prepared to concede individual freedoms if they're in the best interests of everybody.

- LOTS more advertising in the U.S. I always laugh when I cross over from Detroit to Windsor, because there's mile after mile of billboards on I-75 (American side) but then when you get onto 401 (Canadian side) there's nothing.

- Canada is more laid-back, America is more hustle-and-bustle. There's LOTS of people in the U.S., lots going on, and plenty to do. Outside of Canada's major centers (Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, etc.) there are vast stretches of open space dotted with sleepy little towns. In most parts of the U.S., you can't drive more than an hour in any direction without hitting a fairly populated area.

- Religion isn't nearly as big a deal in Canada as it is in the U.S. (at least where I'm from in Southwestern Ontario). In fact, growing up I didn't know anybody that even went to church on Sundays. In the U.S., religion is a big, divisive topic.

- The military is a much bigger deal in the U.S. than in Canada. Growing up I didn't know anybody that had been in the Canadian army (and I grew up in a city of 300,000-plus), but since living in the U.S. I can name 10 people off the top of my head that have served, and unfortunately know a guy that died serving in the Middle East a couple of years ago. Big cultural difference there.

That's my 20 cents.


Hi, I really enjoyed reading your posts. Thanks again for that

The only thing that I dont like about Canada is harsh winters though its better overall.

Can you tell me if summers are long and good in the Toronto area?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2007, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Axarquía, Andalucía, Spain
2,940 posts, read 5,173,864 times
Reputation: 1694
P.S How long would I need to live in Canada before I could become a resident?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top