U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-08-2013, 08:11 PM
 
2,546 posts, read 6,613,063 times
Reputation: 2008

Advertisements

Do you Canadians get less damage to your skin from the sun since the weather isn't as warm as a lot of U.S. States?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-08-2013, 08:41 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,129 posts, read 11,656,809 times
Reputation: 29813
It depends on what part of the country people are in but generally speaking, yes, Canadians get less skin damage from the sun.

.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2013, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Montreal, Quebec
15,084 posts, read 13,592,194 times
Reputation: 9768
Quote:

Do Canadians get less sun damage to their skin? Summers aren't warm,
correct?
Incorrect. Summers can get very hot. It's not dry like Arizona, but throw in the humidity and you feel like you're doing the breast stroke in hot pea soup. In 2010, 106 people in Montreal died from the heat. It was about 110 degrees with the humidex.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2013, 11:01 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,129 posts, read 11,656,809 times
Reputation: 29813
I wasn't going to get into the various temperature ranges across Canada since it was actually skin damage that the OP was asking about but the OP was indeed misinformed about how hot it can get in Canada in the summers.

Most sun related skin damage occurs because of prolonged exposure to ultra violet radiation rather than to heat. It can get just as hot in some places in Canada as it does in Arizona but Canadians are exposed to less UV radiation over the course of a year compared to some of the southern states like Arizona for example where there is more daily and annual exposure to UV even when the temperatures might be cold.

Apparently for the past few days this week in some parts of Nova Scotia the temps got up into the low 40's Centigrade, 110+ Farenheit. Alaska and the Yukon had a heat wave in June that lasted for 4 weeks and the temps got up into the upper 90's F and Anchorage hit 100 F one day in late June. Right now there are parts of the Arctic that are getting temperatures far above what is normal for the Arctic even in summer.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 07-09-2013 at 12:21 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 05:35 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,477 posts, read 56,931,049 times
Reputation: 24825
Most of Canada has longer summer days than the US but the sun angle is lower.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 07:04 AM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,935,511 times
Reputation: 6560
Not much sun gets into my igloo, correct.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 03:14 PM
 
141 posts, read 193,046 times
Reputation: 50
Sun is still strong and hot in Canada, especially in Southern Canada where most Canadians live near the U.S. border. Montreal and Toronto have hot summers generally.

It may not be as hot as the southwest and south, but still quite warm.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 03:17 PM
 
8,780 posts, read 8,769,646 times
Reputation: 9530
warmth has nothing to do with sun damage or its severity levels.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Ontario
332 posts, read 915,351 times
Reputation: 289
Exactly. If you laid out in the sun in Montreal for an hour in 80 degrees you would get a sunburn. If you did the same in Florida at 80 degrees you'd also get a sunburn but probably one that needs medical attention.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-09-2013, 09:42 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,856 posts, read 9,812,751 times
Reputation: 5416
Quote:
Originally Posted by rego00123 View Post
warmth has nothing to do with sun damage or its severity levels.
To a degree it does. With all the layers I'm wearing in winter, I'm not going to get as much sun damage going outside even if the UV index is the same as if it were 20 degrees outside.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top