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Old 07-18-2013, 07:33 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,585 posts, read 11,070,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smihaila View Post
Sorry, but you are wrong here. Nicoale Paulescu - a Romanian - has in fact discovered the insulin.
Nicolae Paulescu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sounds like a bang-up guy...

Paulescu has been criticized for his political activity centered on antisemitic views, which found their expression also in articles such as The Judeo-Masonic plot against the Romanian nation...
In "Degenerarea rasei jidănești" (1928) (transl. Degeneration of the **** Race") Paulescu states that Jews are degenerate because their brains weigh much less than "Arian" brains. He singles out for their low brain weight the Nobel Prize laureates Anatole France (non-Jewish), Albert Einstein and Henri Bergson.

From the above wiki.
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,747,108 times
Reputation: 7293
Quote:
Originally Posted by smihaila View Post
Sorry, but you are wrong here. Nicoale Paulescu - a Romanian - has in fact discovered the insulin.
Nicolae Paulescu - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The story of insulin.

The Discovery of Insulin
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:50 AM
 
40 posts, read 40,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucknow View Post
Well, there have been a few good things invented and discovered here. The telephone for one. Brantford On is the telephone city. The first call ever transmitted was done there. The discovery of insulin has saved millions from certain death. There have been many other medical discoveries by Canadians. The mapping of the brain is an interesting one although it was a Canadian at Harvard. The world can thank Canada for the snowmobile, the first commercial passenger jet, the hydrofoil boat, that was Alexander Graham Bell again, The snow blower, the fog horn. The prosthetic hand and the electric wheelchair and the electron microscope.

ASDIC and sonar were key Canadian inventions that helped win WW2. The compound steam engine for marine use was invented by a Canadian in 1842.

Hockey and basketball were invented by Canadians and the instant replay was invented by CBC in 1955. The goalie mask was invented in Canada.

Pablum, wonderbra, the garbage bag, alkaline battery and the egg carton. The caulking gun and the electric oven.

The Caesar cocktail is a Canadian institution. You can`t get one in the USA. They drink bloody Marys there. YUK!
Basketball was invented in Springfield, Massachusetts. Yes Dr. Naismith was Canadian-born but it wasn't made there. If you want to take credit for it then the telephone is actually a Scottish invention since Alexander Graham Bell was born in Edinburgh, Scotland.
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
1,303 posts, read 987,783 times
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I knew some postings here would be shot down. Americans love to point out those who chose to come to Canada but weren't Canadian citizens. Sorta like the endless arguements that start when Canadians mention we beat them in the War of 1812.

Here's one recent one:



Canadian Invention in Malaria Treatment Canadian Invention in Malaria Treatment - SaskatoonHomepage.ca - Saskatoon, Local News, Weather, and Sports.
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
1,303 posts, read 987,783 times
Reputation: 333
Here's a few more (some have already been listed above). Some were developed on Canadian soil by recent immigrants to a very young country...

acrylics (Plexiglas/Perspex/Lucite) - William Chalmers
Actar 911 CPR Dummy - Dianne Croteau, Richard Brault and Jonathan Vinden
air-conditioned railway coach - Henry Ruttan (1858)
antigravity suit - Wilbur R. Franks (1940)
Balderdash - Laura Robinson and Paul Toyne (1984)
basketball - James Naismith (1892)
batteryless radio (AC radio tube) - Edward Samuel Rogers Sr. (1925)
bovril
butter substitute
Canadarm - SPAR and the National Aeronautical Establishment (1981)
calcium carbide and acetylene gas (production of) - Thomas L. "Carbide" Wilson (1892)
carcino embryonic antigen (CEA) blood test - Dr. Phil Gold (1968)
cardiac intensive care unit (first)
cobalt bomb - University of Saskatchewan and Eldorado Mining and Refining (1951)
compound marine engine - Benjamin Franklin Tibbets compound revolving snow shovel (trains)
computerized braille
crash position indicator (C.P.I) - Harry T. Stevinson and David M. Makow (1959)

dental mirror
disintegrating plastic
ear piercer
electric cooking range - Thomas Ahearn (1882)
electric hand prosthesis for children - Helmut Lukas (1971)
electrical car (North America's first)
electric wheelchair - George J. Klein
electron microscope - Prof. E. F. Burton and Cecil Hall, James Hillier and Albert Prebus (late 1930s)
electronic wave organ - Frank Morse Robb (1927)
explosives vapour detector - Dr Lorne Elias (1990)
fathometer - Reginald Fessenden
film developing tank
five pin bowling - Thomas E. Ryan (1909)
foghorn - Robert Foulis (1854)
frozen fish - Dr. Archibald G. Huntsman (1926)

garbage bag (green plastic) - Harry Wasyluk and Larry Hanson (1950s)
Gestalt Photo Mapper - G. Hobrough (1975)
gingerale - John J. McLaughlin (1904)
goalie mask - Jacques Plante (1959)
Green ink - Thomas Sterry Hunt (1862)
hair tonic
heart valve operation (first)
helicopter trap (for landing on ships)
helium as a substitute for hydrogen in airships
hydrofoil boat - Alexander Graham Bell and Casey Baldwin (1908)
IMAX - Grahame Ferguson, Roman Kroitor, Robert Kerr (1968)
instant potato flakes - Dr. Edward Asselbegs and the Food Research Institute (1962)
insulation
insulin (as diabetes treatment) - Dr. Frederick Banting, Dr. Charles Best and Dr. Collip (1921)

Java - James Gosling
Jetline
jolly jumper - Olivia Poole
kerosene - Abraham Gesner (1840)
lacrosse - played since the 1600s; William George Beers set out standard rules (1860)
laser (sailboat) - Bruce Kirby, Ian Bruce and Hans Fogh (1969)
lightbulb (first patented) - Henry Woodward (1874)
liposomes

machine gun tracer bullet
MacPherson gas mask
measure for footwear
Muskol
Newtsuit - Phil Nuytten
newsprint - Charles Fenerty (1838)
Nursing Mother Breast Pads - Marsha Skrypuch (1986)

[/SIZE]
[SIZE=-1] pablum - Drs. Alan Brown, Fred Tisdall, and Theo Drake (1930s)
pacemaker - Wilfred Bigelow[/SIZE]

paint roller - Norman Breakey (1940)
panoramic camera - John Connon (1887)
Phi (position homing indicator for aircraft)
Pictionary - Rob Angel (1986)
pizza pizza telephone computer delivery services
portable high chair
Puzz-3D
(A) Question of Scruples - Robert Simpson (1984)
radar profile recorder - NRC (1947)
radio compass
retractable beer carton handle (Tuck-away-handle Beer Carton) - Steve Pasjac (1957)
rollerskate

screw propeller
ski-binding
snowblower - Arthur Sicard (1927)
snowmobile - Joseph-Armand Bombardier (1937)
snowplow (rotary) - invented by J.W. Elliot (1869), first built by Leslie Brothers (1883)
steam foghorn
standard time - Sir Sanford Fleming (1879)
Stanley Cup - (Canada's Governor-General) Lord Stanley of Preston (1893)
Stol aircraft - de Havilland Canada (1948)
submarine telegraph cable
Superman - Joe Shuster and Jerome Siegel (1938)
table hockey - Donald Munro (1930s)
telephone - Alexander Graham Bell (1874)
Trivial Pursuit - Chris Haney, John Haney and Scott Abbott (1982)

variable Pitch Propeller - Wallace Rupert Turnbull (1918)
Walkie-Talkie - Donald L. Hings (1942)
washing machine
wirephoto - Sir William Stephenson (1921)
Yachtzee
zipper - Gideon Sundback (1913)
"

Quote:
Swedish-born (who later immigrated to Canada), Gideon Sundback, an electrical engineer, was hired to work for the Universal Fastener Company. Good design skills and a marriage to the plant-manager's daughter Elvira Aronson led Sundback to the position of head designer at Universal. He was responsible for improving the far from perfect 'Judson C-curity Fastener.' Unfortunately, Sundback's wife died in 1911. The grieving husband busied himself at the design table and by December of 1913, he had designed the modern zipper.Gideon Sundback increased the number of fastening elements from four per inch to ten or eleven, had two facing-rows of teeth that pulled into a single piece by the slider, and increased the opening for the teeth guided by the slider. The patent for the 'Separable Fastener' was issued in 1917. Sundback also created the manufacturing machine for the new zipper. The 'S-L' or scrapless machine took a special Y-shaped wire and cut scoops from it, then punched the scoop dimple and nib, and clamped each scoop on a cloth tape to produce a continuous zipper chain. Within the first year of operation, Sundback's zipper-making machinery was producing a few hundred feet of fastener per day."


I have no idea when he became a Canadian citizen.

http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa082497.htm


Canadian Things







Last edited by SnowboundwithCabinFever; 07-18-2013 at 11:39 AM..
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
1,303 posts, read 987,783 times
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Do you travel on an airplane? If so you might want to thank a Saskatchewanian for inventing this.....

Quote:
C. Donald Bateman
Born Mar 8 1932

Ground Proximity Warning System

Patent Number(s) 3,922,637
Inducted 2005

C. Donald Bateman has saved the lives of countless airplane passengers with his system for warning pilots of impending crashes. Bateman's Ground Proximity Warning System, or GPWS, detects navigational errors leading to accidents. With GPWS, pilots were notified if they were flying too low or descending too rapidly. Accident rates fell sharply after GPWS equipment became mandatory in 1974.
http://www.invent.org/hall_of_fame/231.html
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:51 AM
 
40 posts, read 40,024 times
Reputation: 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowboundwithCabinFever View Post
I knew some postings here would be shot down. Americans love to point out those who chose to come to Canada but weren't Canadian citizens. Sorta like the endless arguements that start when Canadians mention we beat them in the War of 1812.

Here's one recent one:



Canadian Invention in Malaria Treatment Canadian Invention in Malaria Treatment - SaskatoonHomepage.ca - Saskatoon, Local News, Weather, and Sports.
I wasn't saying that, I was just pointing out that some postings are very vague. Like yes, basketball was created by a Canadian-born physical education teacher, but he didn't think of it and create it until he had moved to the U.S. and was working for the Y.M.C.A; he also obtained U.S. citizenship. So it should be regarded as more of an American invention than a Canadian one.

That's all I'm saying. If Canada wants to take credit for basketball then it could go both ways for the telephone.
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
1,303 posts, read 987,783 times
Reputation: 333
One Canadian invention that is often overlooked:
Quote:
"Henry Woodward of Toronto, who along with Matthew Evans patented a light bulb in 1875. Unfortunately, the two entrepreneurs could not raise the financing to commercialize their invention. The enterprising American Thomas Edison, who had been working on the same idea, bought the rights to their patent. Capital was not a problem for Edison: he had the backing of a syndicate of industrial interests with $50,000 to invest - a sizable sum at the time. Using lower current, a small carbonized filament, and an improved vacuum inside the globe, Edison successfully demonstrated the light bulb in 1879 and, as they say, the rest is history."
History of Electrical Lamps
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
1,303 posts, read 987,783 times
Reputation: 333
Has anyone in your family had cancer? Their life may have been saved by this relatively recent Saskatchewan invention:

Quote:
Celebrate our impact
on cancer treatment


“I just want to thank the man that made that machine. It saved my life—and many, many more. It's wonderful!”
- Patient Olga Campbell treated with cobalt-60 therapy in 1953; from a 1994 CBC interview
In 1951, University of Saskatchewan medical physicist Dr. Harold Johns and his graduate students became the first researchers in the world to successfully treat a cancer patient using cobalt-60 radiation therapy. This innovative technology—dubbed the “cobalt bomb” by the media - revolutionized cancer treatment and saved the lives of millions of cancer patients around the world.
The original calibrated cobalt-60 machine—which treated more than 6,700 patients—was designed by Johns at the U of S and is now permanently housed at the Saskatoon Western Development Museum (WDM ). This radiation machine bombarded cancers deep in the body where previous therapies had been ineffective. In effect, it dropped a bomb on cancer.
Building on its long history of excellence in medical physics and accelerator technology, the University of Saskatchewan is a leader in medical imaging technologies and applications. Among the milestones:
  • World’s first betatron used in a cancer treatment program
  • World’s first effective radiation machine for cancer treatment (cobalt-60 unit)
  • Canada’s only synchrotron—the Canadian Light Source (CLS)
  • North America’s first Biomedical Imaging and Therapy Beamline (BMIT at the CLS)
In 2011, three new major initiatives related to nuclear medicine research at U of S were announced:
  • Pilot project to produce medical isotopes from a new particle accelerator at the CLS
  • Cyclotron for research and production of isotopes for the province’s first PET-CT scanner
  • Nuclear R&D institute at U of S—Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation
Explore on this website the WDM on-line exhibit “The Cancer Bomb”, the timeline of U of S achievement in medical imaging, videos of the people who made this all happen, and stories about the exciting U of S research that is carrying on this legacy.
Cobalt-60 at 60 - University of Saskatchewan
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
1,303 posts, read 987,783 times
Reputation: 333
Saskatchewan farmers with 7 months of winter facing them have patented a number of agricultural inventions. If you eat food you might want to be thankful for their contributions

http://wdm.ca/artifact_articles/WDM_...atentIndex.pdf.
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