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Old 07-24-2013, 01:42 AM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,564 posts, read 12,313,634 times
Reputation: 10018

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To me, the most creditable pride in one's country stems from what it purports to stand for, and how well it lives up to that. My own country made the tremendous mistake of telling me, all my life, that it was the greatest in the world. I began to ask "Why?" The response I always got: "Well, look what we have." I took the guidance that their measure of natural greatness was material things, standard of living, basically how rich one is. Odd how many of those people were fairly poor, thus by their own standards Have-Nots and failures at our values, and never stopped to ask themselves how they measured up in that regard. I finally took them at their word, and realized that nationally, my country really did live up to the value of wealth and wealth alone. I rejected this as a valid standard, and thus was healed of the nationalism indoctrinated into me from childhood.

If I were a Canadian--and it's not out of the question I may eventually be--I'd be proud of my country's values. Diversity, peacekeeping, valor in wartime, a system that enables swift change, civil liberties, ruggedness, civility, and more. All have been aptly demonstrated, with examples known to everyone here. No utopia exists, and surely Canada could aspire to greater sovereignty and domestic promotion of culture, but that's easy to speak of and not so easy to achieve living cheek by jowl with a superpower and pop culture colossus, and across the Pole from another superpower. Human systems are imperfect and involve errors, be they Airborne troopers misbehaving, residential schools like Shubenacadie, or protracted attempts to assimilate Francophone culture. I can't name a country that doesn't have things to be embarrassed about. But when I look north, I can see a lot of values I can respect. Perhaps some Canadians do not; their choice. Maybe if they traveled a bit in my shoes, and saw the difference in world perceptions and prejudices based on nationality, they might reconsider. Or not; also their choice.
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Old 07-24-2013, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Brossard
66 posts, read 109,275 times
Reputation: 98
It stems from a cultural insecurity in an attempt to somehow make us believe that there still are some significant cultural ties to royalty in Britain, probably just as an excuse to force a sense of differentiation of our values in comparison to our neighbors down south. There are plenty of other predominantly unknown unique cultural differences that the major media outlets refuse to recognize, rather they just rely on stereotypical aspects of the past to gain that community feeling.
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Old 07-24-2013, 02:07 AM
 
34,396 posts, read 41,499,470 times
Reputation: 29872
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
3) popularity of window unit A/C (oh, God, it is phased out in even many developing countries years ago. How are they still being used in houses and apartments )

none of them screams "advanced first world country". Many Canadians seem to live in the bubble that we lead the world in terms of technology and lifestyle while in fact even developing countries are laughing at us for how backward things are.
Really?

India struggles to keep pace with its love of appliances | Arab News
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Old 07-24-2013, 02:32 AM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
11,265 posts, read 13,167,241 times
Reputation: 13467
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_k_k View Post
To me, the most creditable pride in one's country stems from what it purports to stand for, and how well it lives up to that. My own country made the tremendous mistake of telling me, all my life, that it was the greatest in the world. I began to ask "Why?" The response I always got: "Well, look what we have." I took the guidance that their measure of natural greatness was material things, standard of living, basically how rich one is. Odd how many of those people were fairly poor, thus by their own standards Have-Nots and failures at our values, and never stopped to ask themselves how they measured up in that regard. I finally took them at their word, and realized that nationally, my country really did live up to the value of wealth and wealth alone. I rejected this as a valid standard, and thus was healed of the nationalism indoctrinated into me from childhood.

If I were a Canadian--and it's not out of the question I may eventually be--I'd be proud of my country's values. Diversity, peacekeeping, valor in wartime, a system that enables swift change, civil liberties, ruggedness, civility, and more. All have been aptly demonstrated, with examples known to everyone here. No utopia exists, and surely Canada could aspire to greater sovereignty and domestic promotion of culture, but that's easy to speak of and not so easy to achieve living cheek by jowl with a superpower and pop culture colossus, and across the Pole from another superpower. Human systems are imperfect and involve errors, be they Airborne troopers misbehaving, residential schools like Shubenacadie, or protracted attempts to assimilate Francophone culture. I can't name a country that doesn't have things to be embarrassed about. But when I look north, I can see a lot of values I can respect. Perhaps some Canadians do not; their choice. Maybe if they traveled a bit in my shoes, and saw the difference in world perceptions and prejudices based on nationality, they might reconsider. Or not; also their choice.

Always love your posts, jkk.
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Old 07-24-2013, 08:16 AM
 
1,218 posts, read 2,116,888 times
Reputation: 1316
Overall I am a proud to be from Canada, even though it is not perfect and a lot of my values don't overlap with the mainstream. Living in the US now, I am also proud to live south of border as well even though I despise many policies here too. I guess we can always find plenty to complain about no matter where we live but there's nothing wrong with questioning things at times either because that is how change is affected. I think the issue may be one that has plagued Canada from Day 1 - benchmarking to the US. When someone says they don't have pride in Canada, they are probably internally comparing it to its big neighbor to the south in ways it cannot win. So we can complain as to why don't we have the latest technology? Why don't we invent the latest gadgets? Why does everything cost so much? Why don't we have the best universities? etc... but we must not lose perspective and forget that we are just 34M vs. 314M. In other words, we can't hold a small nation to the same bar across every category because its just not realistic, especially when you factor in economies of scale. Instead, compare Canada to California (38M) or Texas (26M) or add a couple of big states together to even things out and suddenly we would stack up fairly well.

Canada's strength is lifestyle but it also a place where peace, tolerance, safety, order, stability, open-mindedness, and social consciousness does flourish as well as or in some ways, better than the US. The US has many strengths that I admire like its industriousness, assertiveness, risk-taking, confidence, competitiveness, and patriotism. If we take the best attributes of both countries and roll them into one, then it quite possibly could form the best nation ever (bold subjective comment I know!).

Last edited by johnathanc; 07-24-2013 at 09:04 AM..
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Old 07-28-2013, 11:51 PM
 
Location: Toronto
1,570 posts, read 2,814,569 times
Reputation: 1591
Geeving about the royal family.
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Old 07-29-2013, 01:27 AM
 
2,096 posts, read 3,853,170 times
Reputation: 1214
Having royalty actually has its upsides. For example you've had Old Liz for 60 years, someone most people like. Having a President as opposing to a monarch makes the country more divided and "political" IMO.
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Old 07-29-2013, 01:35 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,541,240 times
Reputation: 8193
Quote:
Originally Posted by belmont22 View Post
Having royalty actually has its upsides. For example you've had Old Liz for 60 years, someone most people like. Having a President as opposing to a monarch makes the country more divided and "political" IMO.
You could well be right about that.
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Old 07-29-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,762,959 times
Reputation: 7313
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
No, it doesn't.
I remember last year one day during rush hour the TTC shut its subway from Union to Bloor because there was 25mm of rain, or an inch. Do you think any city would have the same issue?



Canada is hardly first world. Maybe you believe so, or the UN says so. I don't buy it. Here are some examples

1) the TTC - national shame. Are we in 1985?
2) our train system (VIA is really pathetic in terms of both speed and comfort).
3) popularity of window unit A/C (oh, God, it is phased out in even many developing countries years ago. How are they still being used in houses and apartments )
4) those hot water tanks every houses seem to have one (you will find it hard to see them outside N.A.)
5) convenience of online shopping, availability of consumer products
6) Is there Canadian cars? high tech products? electronics? brand name clothing?

none of them screams "advanced first world country". Many Canadians seem to live in the bubble that we lead the world in terms of technology and lifestyle while in fact even developing countries are laughing at us for how backward things are.
Yes other metro's have closed because of rain, it's NOT a Toronto thing.

BBC NEWS | UK | England | London | Rain floods London Tube stations

The TTC is not a national shame. That's a very Toronto-centric view. Canadians are NOT sitting around fretting about Toronto transit. Very odd statement.

Via rail, and Amtrak are operating in a much larger area than Europe. In the Canadian west there isn't the ridership to support the cost of high-speed rail east to west. They are looking at a north and southern route between Vancouver and L.A.
I love rail, but the situation regarding rail in Canada and the U.S. is a very different one than Europe.

AC units again may be a Toronto and Montreal thing since we don't really need AC here in Vancouver. Most people who do have it have inside units. My friends in Toronto have always had HVAC units and not window units, so it's not as universal as you make it sound.
However I don't know why you think it's just a Toronto thing. You do seem window units still in NYC and Chicago and many other cities around the world.

Hot water tanks instead of instant european type tanks is what you are referring to? Well I hate to break it to you, but you do see both in Europe, and I'm sure other places in the world. The apartments I rent in the South of France have hot water tanks, about half the size of Canadians ones, usually located lovingly in the toilet room.

Others have tackled the online shopping issues, you can find the thread and learn.

Read up on the Auto pact. Canada got screwed.

Canada

However there are Canadian car makers making electric cars.

ZENN Motor Company

Electric Vehicle Manufacturers in Canada

also companies like Ballard Power Systems makes fuel cells,among other things and is known in internationally.

Fuel Cell Buses | Fuel Cell Applications | Ballard Power Systems

as for high tech, I'm assuming you are talking only about high tech consumer products. The high tech industry does have issues in Canada, but it exists and is a multi-billion dollar industry. Here's an article that explains the situation.

Canada

Most clothing isn't made in the country anymore...too many Walmart Shoppers saw to that. As for Canadian brands, there are many. Some like lululemon are well known. Here's a list of some.

Category:Clothing companies of Canada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I agree though with the poster who thought your criteria for being proud of a country was quite shallow.

Also you don't seem to understand the definition of a first world country.

"Definition of 'First World'
1. A country that was aligned with the West and opposed to the Soviet Union during the Cold War. Since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, this use of First World has largely gone away.

2. A country characterized by political stability, democracy, rule of law, a capitalist economy, economic stability and a high standard of living. Various definitions have been used for First World nations, including GDP, GNP and literacy rates. The Human Development Index is also a good indicator in determining First World countries.

3. First-world countries have stable currencies and robust financial markets, making them attractive to investors from all over the world. Examples of first-world countries include the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and the Western European countries. First-world countries are in the minority; most countries are classified as second- or third-world.

Last edited by Natnasci; 07-29-2013 at 12:55 PM..
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