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Old 07-22-2013, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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You may have heard or read about the financial woes of Detroit. Let's play a game and assume Detroit were to (re)join Canada. What solutions would Canada offer to improve Detroit?
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Old 07-22-2013, 11:37 AM
 
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Let's fix our pathetic economic dependence on the US first. When Detroit goes, all the auto factories and jobs in southern Ontario go with it. How many jobs hinge on the American auto industry. We are like the Foxconn for Detroit.
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Old 07-22-2013, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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Some Canadians find Detroit a great place to visit. Do they visit the "hip" areas (Corktown, Greektown) or all parts of the city?
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Old 07-22-2013, 12:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
You may have heard or read about the financial woes of Detroit. Let's play a game and assume Detroit were to (re)join Canada. What solutions would Canada offer to improve Detroit?
The issue is Canada is not that well off Ontario and Quebec both have massive debts the Atlantic coast has a big debt the only areas doing well is Alberta.
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Old 07-22-2013, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
10,912 posts, read 23,234,917 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
You may have heard or read about the financial woes of Detroit. Let's play a game and assume Detroit were to (re)join Canada. What solutions would Canada offer to improve Detroit?
I do not think Quebec and Ontario provincial Government(s) or the Canadian Federal Government could afford to Bail out Detroit either.

It just has way too much debt and we would be in the same bind as the Michigan State and U.S. Federal Government are in with it now in dealing with the cities massive deficit.


To be honest I have no idea how you would go about bringing the Motor City back to it's former Glory days.
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Old 07-22-2013, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Northern Ontario, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GTOlover View Post
I do not think Quebec and Ontario provincial Government(s) or the Canadian Federal Government could afford to Bail out Detroit either.

It just has way too much debt and we would be in the same bind as the Michigan State and U.S. Federal Government are in with it now in dealing with the cities massive deficit.


To be honest I have no idea how you would go about bringing the Motor City back to it's former Glory days.
I wouldn't know where to begin either but one thing is for certain: if Detroit were in Canada, all the afflications that have plagued the city - deindustrialization, racial tension, the housing crisis, etc. - either never would have happened or would have been FAR less pronounced. Canada's history of paternalistic concern for the societal good would never allow a city of such magnitude to become a barren wasteland.
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Old 07-22-2013, 01:34 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
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No point in sending good money in after bad. Knock it down and plow it under, put in greenhouses.

.
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Old 07-22-2013, 02:14 PM
 
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Given the state of disrepair of some of the buildings either commercial or residential that would be impossible to renovate back into service, knocking them down sooner rather than later would be a place to start.

Putting crews to work demolishing, shredding, recycling to return those lots to vacant property suitable for development could employ thousands and tax incentives for business's to locate on those empty sites might serve to entice some industrial, commercial, residential rejuvenation.

The city as it stands now is a blight on the landscape. Put some welfare recipients to work with sledges and wheelbarrows.
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Old 07-22-2013, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Beautiful Niagara Falls ON.
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It's not a fair comparison on how Canada does not allow it's cities to fall into rack and ruin the way the USA does. It certainly is not just Detroit falling into complete rack and ruin but many many US cities face the same plight.

The reason I say it's completely different is this. In Canada most of major cities lie on the best land we have. They are mostly in the south of the country and there are few alternatives and for that reason we preserve our cities even during hard times. That is not the case in the USA. There is an alternative to those rust belt cities on better lands with better climates. People can go west or south and find places to live that could even be better than where they came from. Take Buffalo for example. It's lost three quarters of it's population in the last 60 years. I'm sure the ex Buffalonians are living in places as good or better than Buffalo.

In Canada the relocation choices are a small fraction of those in the USA.
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Old 07-22-2013, 07:44 PM
 
297 posts, read 392,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lucknow View Post
It's not a fair comparison on how Canada does not allow it's cities to fall into rack and ruin the way the USA does. It certainly is not just Detroit falling into complete rack and ruin but many many US cities face the same plight.

The reason I say it's completely different is this. In Canada most of major cities lie on the best land we have. They are mostly in the south of the country and there are few alternatives and for that reason we preserve our cities even during hard times. That is not the case in the USA. There is an alternative to those rust belt cities on better lands with better climates. People can go west or south and find places to live that could even be better than where they came from. Take Buffalo for example. It's lost three quarters of it's population in the last 60 years. I'm sure the ex Buffalonians are living in places as good or better than Buffalo.

In Canada the relocation choices are a small fraction of those in the USA.
True. I would totally be willing to leave my small Connecticut for California. I doubt many people would want to leave lets say Calgary for The northwest territories
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