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Old 07-22-2013, 06:34 PM
 
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Do these quotes seem accurate about Canadian-American Relations?

"when I have been in Canada, I have never heard a Canadian refer to an American as a "foreigner." He is just an "American." And, in the same way, in the United States, Canadians are not "foreigners," they are "Canadians." That simple little distinction illustrates to me better than anything else the relationship between our two countries."

"Geography has made us neighbors. History has made us friends. Economics has made us partners. And necessity has made us allies. Those whom nature hath so joined together, let no man put asunder. What unites us is far greater than what divides us."
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Old 07-22-2013, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Canada
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I can't speak for the American side of the fence, but I think it is true on this side of the border, regardless of the animosity that flares up on this board from time to time. I do agree with the second quotation. We share a continent and have common origins, and have been a great experiment in melding many nationalities into one, even if we do it in different ways. And for the most part, I think both our nations have been very successful at it.
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Old 07-22-2013, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ishabad View Post
Do these quotes seem accurate about Canadian-American Relations?

"when I have been in Canada, I have never heard a Canadian refer to an American as a "foreigner." He is just an "American." And, in the same way, in the United States, Canadians are not "foreigners," they are "Canadians." That simple little distinction illustrates to me better than anything else the relationship between our two countries."

"Geography has made us neighbors. History has made us friends. Economics has made us partners. And necessity has made us allies. Those whom nature hath so joined together, let no man put asunder. What unites us is far greater than what divides us."
Don't agree with the first one, since people call each individual from another country in the same way. Italians visiting Canada are referred to as Italians etc.
There are certain situations when I have used foreigner to someone from the U.S. when explaining the reason a certain shop doesn't take USD and don't have to because it's foreign. This seems to confuse some folks from the U.S. who never consider themselves foreign anywhere

The second quote is true, except I feel in the last 40 years the two countries have gone in different directions ins many ways.
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Old 07-22-2013, 07:41 PM
 
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The first point you are making alot of time and I can understand how we have taken two different paths on many issues but essentially that quote is still true
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Old 07-23-2013, 02:19 AM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ishabad View Post
"Geography has made us neighbors. History has made us friends. Economics has made us partners. And necessity has made us allies. Those whom nature hath so forejoined together, let no man put asunder. What unites us is far greater than what divides us."
Those were JFK's remarks before the Canadian Parliament, on May 17, 1961. Cite to JFK's entire speech before the Canadian Parliament that day.

In regards to the above, I think that today's American authorities have forgotten the sentiments that Mr. Kennedy spoke about in Parliament that day. They have forgotten how Canadians have helped them out numerous times (NBC's Tom Brokaw explains that in an easily-searchable video called "Tom Brokaw Explains Canada to Americans.") Today's United States forgets how Canada has been by its side so often--and yet today, somehow considers all Canadians to be either terrorists or wannabe-Americans. Bull-crap, as Mr. Kennedy and Mr. Brokaw indicated.

Throughout history, and in short, our two countries work together, for our mutual satisfaction and prosperity

'Nuff said on that topic for now.

I will note that right here on City-Data, we Canadians have to put up with the following American trolling, from an uneducated and ungrateful American:

Why do Canadian immigrants have to swear an oath to the British Queen?
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Old 07-23-2013, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
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Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Don't agree with the first one, since people call each individual from another country in the same way. Italians visiting Canada are referred to as Italians etc.
There are certain situations when I have used foreigner to someone from the U.S. when explaining the reason a certain shop doesn't take USD and don't have to because it's foreign. This seems to confuse some folks from the U.S. who never consider themselves foreign anywhere
I'll disagree a bit, as a Canadian living in the U.S. we now have our green cards, and on multiple occasions when talking to our friends and co-workers about the tribulations of the process, the constant refrain was along the lines of; "Why do you need it, you're not immigrants, you're Canadian."
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Old 07-23-2013, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
I'll disagree a bit, as a Canadian living in the U.S. we now have our green cards, and on multiple occasions when talking to our friends and co-workers about the tribulations of the process, the constant refrain was along the lines of; "Why do you need it, you're not immigrants, you're Canadian."
Interesting...but then I've met Americans who do think Canada is somehow part of the U.S. so it doesn't surprise me.
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Old 07-23-2013, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
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Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Interesting...but then I've met Americans who do think Canada is somehow part of the U.S. so it doesn't surprise me.
I'm sure a large part of it is due to the current political environment. Immigrant now means brown person, usually Mexican (illegal) or South Asian (I.T. people who take "our" jobs) It's in the lexicon of usage only slightly higher than terrorist on the visual image tree of non-white people.
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Old 07-23-2013, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,544,693 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Don't agree with the first one, since people call each individual from another country in the same way. Italians visiting Canada are referred to as Italians etc.
There are certain situations when I have used foreigner to someone from the U.S. when explaining the reason a certain shop doesn't take USD and don't have to because it's foreign. This seems to confuse some folks from the U.S. who never consider themselves foreign anywhere

The second quote is true, except I feel in the last 40 years the two countries have gone in different directions ins many ways.
Yes, that's true too. I'm going to amend my post a bit - I don't think I have ever heard any foreigner referred to as a foreigner but by their nationality - Chinese, American, German, etc. Not saying it doesn't happen but I've never heard it that I can remember. I do think that regardless of the use or lack of use of the term 'foreigner,' we probably consider the Americans a little less 'foreign' than other nationalities (save, perhaps, the British).

I don't know about 40 years - I think that where the differences kicked in was during the GWB years. I believe it was Rumsfeld that referred to "old" Europe as a way to dismiss those who didn't support the American agenda at the time - it was very disrespectful and not a way to go to win friends and influence people.

So, I do agree that we seem to be going in different directions. Time will tell. But historically, we share a great deal.
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Old 07-23-2013, 05:36 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
I'm sure a large part of it is due to the current political environment. Immigrant now means brown person, usually Mexican (illegal) or South Asian (I.T. people who take "our" jobs) It's in the lexicon of usage only slightly higher than terrorist on the visual image tree of non-white people.
Oh...unfortunately that makes sense. How sad really.
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