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Old 07-30-2013, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley
4,063 posts, read 9,133,379 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
I couldn't access it for some reason. I didn't know that about the other provinces.
Here's an exerpt:

"There are drawbacks. As it stands now, some Canadians would lose their provincial health coverage if they stayed in the United States longer than six months a year, said Dale Walters, a partner and chief executive officer of KeatsConnelly, a wealth-management firm for Canadians and Americans that has offices in Arizona, Florida and Calgary, Alberta.
“Basically, there are different rules depending on what province you live in,” Walters said.
The Toronto-based Canadian Snowbird Association has successfully lobbied British Columbia and Manitoba to extend the limit on their residents to seven months, from six months, Rachkovsky said.
Residents from those provinces, as well as from Ontario and Newfoundland and Labrador, can be away for longer than six months and retain health benefits, he said.
Meanwhile, residents of Alberta — who logged the most visits to Arizona out of all Canadians in 2011 — are still limited to half a year.
The Canadian Snowbird Association is lobbying officials in Alberta to change that, Rachkovsky said."
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Old 07-30-2013, 03:17 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,695 posts, read 6,551,110 times
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Very interesting. I sometimes have trouble with some websites from my iPad. I'll try to read it later with my laptop.
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Old 07-30-2013, 03:20 PM
 
18,345 posts, read 10,414,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adventuregurl View Post
I found the article in The AZ Republic, that's why it mentions AZ, but I would assume that it applies to the whole of the US.

Yes, AZ has a very low cost of living compared to Canada (or San Diego).
Usually; any place in the U.S. will display a lower cost of living than in Canada.

Provinces have different rules regarding out of Province times. Highest are Ontario at 215 days and the Territories with no limit; while the lowest being an eastern province with just 159 days out allowed before you must return to re-activate your provincial coverage and, as we all know, any out of Province optional travel health care is contingent upon your Basic Provincial provided health care remaining active.

If you overstay your out of Province limit of days there is no "top up" travel medical coverage available that will pay if you've screwed the pooch.

Some Provinces allow a one time only exemption from the time out rules but, you must apply and fulfill some requirements to avail yourself of that feature and it is not available on a year by year basis.

In short this change to visa restrictions for snowbirds is more in keeping with avoiding the filing of an IRS form or tax statement to avoid the paying of taxes on any income you are making, regardless if Canadian derived or not, if you overstay a 183 day limit spread over a three year term.
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Old 07-30-2013, 08:32 PM
509
 
3,027 posts, read 4,100,580 times
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IF your going to spend MORE than HALF the year in the STATES....BECOME AN AMERICAN.

As a snowbird I am tired of Canadians taking up space in my country. Hey a two week vacation is fine. BUT SEVEN MONTHS??? Cut me a break.

Canadian law limits stays to six months for Americans. Six months in Canada!! How long is the country snowfree??
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Old 07-31-2013, 03:28 AM
 
1,317 posts, read 2,037,117 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
IF your going to spend MORE than HALF the year in the STATES....BECOME AN AMERICAN.
Unless Canadians are 50% or more of native/indian blood, unless they marry an American citizen or someone who has been granted permanent residency in the United States, or unless they are sponsored for a Green Card by their employers (a fairly rare occurrence), this is virtually impossible for most native born Canadians. I'd love to become an American; it's only the mad immigration laws down there that have stopped me from doing so.
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Old 07-31-2013, 07:15 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,292,483 times
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I couldn't help asking, regarding 6months and healthcare coverage, how would your province know that you are away from Canada for seven months?

Suppose you stayed in the US for 7 months and come back, and go to see a doctor. How would the doctor know you are not eligible for healthcare benefits any more? You probably don't even have a stamp on your passport, and even if you do, no doctor will check your passport

I wonder at that stage will the healthcare provider detect you were away for too long.
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Old 07-31-2013, 07:20 AM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,292,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 509 View Post
IF your going to spend MORE than HALF the year in the STATES....BECOME AN AMERICAN.

As a snowbird I am tired of Canadians taking up space in my country. Hey a two week vacation is fine. BUT SEVEN MONTHS??? Cut me a break.

Canadian law limits stays to six months for Americans. Six months in Canada!! How long is the country snowfree??
It is not exactly easy to become American.
For a retiree, close to impossible. Who the hell want a new citizen that is completely unable to work?

Plus, if they do become American, many will be eligible for the entitlement programs in the US, which your taxes paid for, while having contributed nothing to it when they were young, do you think it is fair?

It works the best for America. Those retirees come to the US to shop, buy houses and consume, and go back to Canada for any benefits (healthcare, OAS etc.). It is Canada that should worry.
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Old 07-31-2013, 08:38 AM
 
18,345 posts, read 10,414,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
It is not exactly easy to become American.
For a retiree, close to impossible. Who the hell want a new citizen that is completely unable to work?

Plus, if they do become American, many will be eligible for the entitlement programs in the US, which your taxes paid for, while having contributed nothing to it when they were young, do you think it is fair?

It works the best for America. Those retirees come to the US to shop, buy houses and consume, and go back to Canada for any benefits (healthcare, OAS etc.). It is Canada that should worry.
While I agree with the bulk of your post; it is not impossible for a Canadian retiree to become an American citizen. You are on a fast track if you have resources (money) that would now become seconded to the American economy with all taxes being paid to America on income derived from your previous Canadian (or other) derived investment incomes.

If one is willing and has the resources that can garner sponsorship from the likes of a congressman or MP, it works the same in both directions.

Wealth redistribution, the great equalizer/incentive.
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Old 07-31-2013, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,695 posts, read 6,551,110 times
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Strange that I can't access that website even on my laptop. Always get the message that cookies must be enabled, but mine are....so.....
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Old 07-31-2013, 11:49 AM
509
 
3,027 posts, read 4,100,580 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
It works the best for America. Those retirees come to the US to shop, buy houses and consume, and go back to Canada for any benefits (healthcare, OAS etc.). It is Canada that should worry.
It works best for SOME American's.....however, tourists are a NET LOSS to government revenues in almost all cases. So the taxpayers of Florida and Arizona pay to provide government services to Canadian snowbirds. If we had a snowbird tax on non-residents of say $1,000 month that would help make up the difference.

There are lots of Europeans, Asians and others that would love to visit the US. What's wrong with a little diversity in our visitors.

I saw a Canadian statistic that 15% of Canada leaves for the winter. That is a lot of people for American taxpayers to support!! We will skip our guests from Mexico for now.
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