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Old 08-05-2013, 01:58 AM
 
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I'm working on finishing high school right now and I'm considering either going to college/university in Canada (anywhere, no specific location) or going to college here in the states and then moving. I've done a bunch of research on Canada itself, along with Australia and the UK, trying to find a place to move here in two or three years. I don't want to be halfway around the world from every other English speaking country, and after reading/hearing about the cost of living in the UK and the general conditions in the cities, I decided against it. However, I recall reading about college being cheap(er) in certain places in CA and that got me wondering as to what I should do.

Too long; didn't read: Should I move to Canada before or after going to college?
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Canada
4,698 posts, read 8,486,989 times
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Before, it will be cheaper, your connections and training will be more specific to the country you want to be in long term, and immigration will be easier with the extra years of Canadian experience.
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:42 AM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,161,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIMBAM View Post
Before, it will be cheaper, your connections and training will be more specific to the country you want to be in long term, and immigration will be easier with the extra years of Canadian experience.
Assuming OP can afford it. US financial aid will not pay the entire tuition, room, and boarding fees for Canadian universities; and Canadian universities do charge extra for international students, on the order of thousands of dollars
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
2,089 posts, read 1,457,362 times
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It won't be cheaper first of all, as you'll be paying higher tuition as a foreign student. Really, a lot of it depends on the industry you're interested in entering, some recognize US college education more readily than others. Also, you have a much better chance of reaching your goal to work in this country if your chosen field is in demand and there is a shortage of qualified workers.

And education DOES NOT count as work experience, as the other poster stated.


...Or, marry a Canadian...
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Old 08-05-2013, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2,540 posts, read 3,269,227 times
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The steps are as follows;

First, apply and be accepted, by a Canadian University, and receive a "letter of acceptance " back from them by mail.


Then, apply to the Canadian Government, for a student VISA. That, if granted, will allow you to come to Canada, to begin your studies.

A few points about this process. Having been granted a Student VISA to study in Canada does NOT confer ANY Immigration status, at all. NONE. In reality at the end of your student VISA, you must GO HOME, back to the States. If you don't, you are then " out of status " and can be deported from Canada.

If you want to be a Immigrant, you have to apply as one, and that is a completely separate and different application from a student visa application. You cannot be both, at the same time. Not allowed.

To be approved as a Immigrant, you will need to have completed a 4 year University degree, AND have a minimum of three years of actual directly related work experience, in your field of training..... OR be a State certified trades person, with a minimum of 3 years of related work experience , in the USA.

At your current age , with no degree, or trades certification, you don't qualify as a Immigrant, so your only path is as a student. Be aware that in Canada, scholarships are only given to out citizens, and the amount that YOU will pay will be about twice what a Canadian student will pay, for the same courses. Obviously , in addition to tuition costs, you will also be paying all costs of living, including buying private medical insurance.

Having said all that, many US students are all ready attending Canadian Universities, and doing well.

Good Luck.

Jim B

Toronto.
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Old 08-05-2013, 10:44 AM
 
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Canadian citizen's post has some major inaccuracies. I don't have time to address all the inaccuracies right now but I would advise you to look at Citizenship & Immigration Canada's website for the real scoop on immigration to Canada.
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Old 08-05-2013, 11:32 AM
 
1,746 posts, read 4,632,871 times
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Originally Posted by tarp View Post
Canadian citizen's post has some major inaccuracies. I don't have time to address all the inaccuracies right now but I would advise you to look at Citizenship & Immigration Canada's website for the real scoop on immigration to Canada.
I agree.

I'd even go further and say that the most of Canadian citizen's post is BS.

Coming to Canada as a student can be a direct path to Canadian permanent resident status.

Here is all info you need:

Home - Citizenship and Immigration Canada - Canada
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Old 08-05-2013, 04:51 PM
 
3,274 posts, read 3,691,758 times
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I'd say that both of your viewpoints (Canadian Citizen and movingwiththwind) are extreme and not quite accurate. Take that from a foreign student who became a permanent resident.

On the one hand, being a student in Canada does help you get PR status more easily by assuring that you get a post graduate work permit, which you then use to get work experience, which you then use to apply for PR. However, it does NOT shorten the process. On the contrary, it lengthens it. It makes it a long, relatively easy process, as opposed to a short, but more difficult (and with less guarantees) process if you applied as a complete foreigner with work experience from outside Canada.

Remember, "easy" and "quick" are not synonymous with each other.

Keep in mind that you can only obtain ONE postgraduate work permit in your lifetime, and any studies after that before you get PR nullifies it for life.

I became a student in 2003. I graduated in 2007 and decided to pursue a Master's degree. I graduated from that in 2010 and applied for a PGWP. I applied for permanent residence in 2011. Due to bureaucratic messups that weren't my fault, my file got delayed and I got my PR in early 2013, nearly ten years after I first became a student.

It's very easy for intl' students to obtain complete scholarships for M.SC and Ph.D programs. It's more difficult for undergraduate studies, although small scholarships (less than $5000) are easy to obtain.

PS: it was also charming to see the lack of coordination between agencies in Canada. To be admitted into university, I had to take the TOEFL despite English being my first language. Then when I applied for PR, I had to take the IELTS despite the fact English was my first language, that I had six years of education in Canada, AND that I had already taken the TOEFL to get those six years of education. Charming...
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Old 08-05-2013, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,698 posts, read 8,486,989 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zortation View Post
It won't be cheaper first of all, as you'll be paying higher tuition as a foreign student. Really, a lot of it depends on the industry you're interested in entering, some recognize US college education more readily than others. Also, you have a much better chance of reaching your goal to work in this country if your chosen field is in demand and there is a shortage of qualified workers.

And education DOES NOT count as work experience, as the other poster stated.


...Or, marry a Canadian...
As a foreign student they don't get subsidized Canadian tuition, but it's on average still somewhat cheaper than what one would pay for the equivalent in the US.
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Old 08-05-2013, 06:41 PM
 
1,746 posts, read 4,632,871 times
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Originally Posted by arctic_gardener View Post
I'd say that both of your viewpoints (Canadian Citizen and movingwiththwind) are extreme and not quite accurate. Take that from a foreign student who became a permanent resident.

On the one hand, being a student in Canada does help you get PR status more easily by assuring that you get a post graduate work permit, which you then use to get work experience, which you then use to apply for PR. However, it does NOT shorten the process. On the contrary, it lengthens it. It makes it a long, relatively easy process, as opposed to a short, but more difficult (and with less guarantees) process if you applied as a complete foreigner with work experience from outside Canada.

Remember, "easy" and "quick" are not synonymous with each other.

Keep in mind that you can only obtain ONE postgraduate work permit in your lifetime, and any studies after that before you get PR nullifies it for life.

I became a student in 2003. I graduated in 2007 and decided to pursue a Master's degree. I graduated from that in 2010 and applied for a PGWP. I applied for permanent residence in 2011. Due to bureaucratic messups that weren't my fault, my file got delayed and I got my PR in early 2013, nearly ten years after I first became a student.

It's very easy for intl' students to obtain complete scholarships for M.SC and Ph.D programs. It's more difficult for undergraduate studies, although small scholarships (less than $5000) are easy to obtain.

PS: it was also charming to see the lack of coordination between agencies in Canada. To be admitted into university, I had to take the TOEFL despite English being my first language. Then when I applied for PR, I had to take the IELTS despite the fact English was my first language, that I had six years of education in Canada, AND that I had already taken the TOEFL to get those six years of education. Charming...
I wouldn't say that my viewpoint in my previous post was extreme.

In fact, the way you described the process only supports what I said: "Coming to Canada as a student can be a direct path to Canadian permanent resident status." I used the word "direct path" to point out that coming as a student directly puts you into a "Canadian experience class", which is a direct path to become a Canadian permanent resident, although there are a couple of steps to follow.

In fact, considering current changes in Canadian immigration rules, coming as a student may be the only way to get Canadian permanent residency for many people.

Please note that nowhere did I say that coming as a student shortens the process, but it does make it a lot easier.
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