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Old 08-15-2013, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,756,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jews for Jesus View Post
^^ Reading comments above - Do you Canadians know that since past decade the color of all US bills have changed and look slightly different design. Only $1 bill is same standard green color, and now in October new $100 design will be out in public.

Example $10 bill is yellow color.
Yes we know, but the changes are slight. The money still looks like it was designed in the 1920's,
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Old 08-15-2013, 07:53 PM
 
Location: USA (dying to live in Canada)
1,034 posts, read 1,561,557 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Yes we know, but the changes are slight. The money still looks like it was designed in the 1920's,
Yeah, but the difference is still pretty clear. If you cover the numbers, you could easily tell the currency by the color and somewhat the design. The US currency is part of the history.

Why did Canada change to plastic money? I like the old ones more.
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Old 08-15-2013, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,756,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jews for Jesus View Post
Yeah, but the difference is still pretty clear. If you cover the numbers, you could easily tell the currency by the color and somewhat the design. The US currency is part of the history.

Why did Canada change to plastic money? I like the old ones more.
Not in a dark bar you can't

We changed for two reasons. Harder to counterfeit ( apparently anyway ) and they last longer than paper bills. We also are in the process of ridding ourselves of the penny. It costed more to make them than they were worth. It only made sense, no one I know is sad to see the penny go.
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Old 08-15-2013, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,175 posts, read 1,752,834 times
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Well, I got beaten to the answer, but I'll post it anyway:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jews for Jesus View Post
Why did Canada change to plastic money? I like the old ones more.
Plastic bills last longer (cost-saving measure) and offer better security against counterfeiting. For example, an optically-variable device can be embedded in a transparent plastic window. Additionally, photocopying or scanning are pretty much impossible to do successfully with a plastic bill.
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Old 08-15-2013, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,360,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
^^you can say the same thing about all of Western Europe. One head, two legs, two arms. Generally shared values. That doesn't mean they aren't different people.
You know I love you netwit but I can't agree with this. When cross from France-Germany, France-UK, Germany-Netherlands, Germany-Denmark, Italy-France, Spain-Portugal, Spain-France, there is more than the language that changes. The way people dress, the food, the way they drive, the way they dress, the songs they sing, the music, the food... it changes.

The closest comparisons to Canada-US for me would be francophone Belgium or francophone Switzerland and France, and Argentina and Uruguay.
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Old 08-15-2013, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,692 posts, read 6,539,959 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
You know I love you netwit but I can't agree with this. When cross from France-Germany, France-UK, Germany-Netherlands, Germany-Denmark, Italy-France, Spain-Portugal, Spain-France, there is more than the language that changes. The way people dress, the food, the way they drive, the way they dress, the songs they sing, the music, the food... it changes.

The closest comparisons to Canada-US for me would be francophone Belgium or francophone Switzerland and France, and Argentina and Uruguay.
First, I am always a bit confused when the word 'culture' comes up in a post because I am never sure if people are referring to popular culture (Justin Bieber/whatever is playing on the radio these days/TV shows), or high culture (the Europeans tending to sneer at the very idea of North America and 'culture' being used in one sentence), or the kind of ingrained culture which we all have simply by virtue of where we are born.

This is the wrong thread for this and I knew when I posted that some would disagree with me, which doesn't bother me in the slightest, but I am referring to the received culture we grow up with. I am not saying one culture (Canadian versus American) is better or worse (refreshing, isn't it?). I am saying that what people tend to feel is acceptable comes from the larger society. If Canadians have different views on gun ownership or gay marriage or how we talk or don't talk about religious faith publically, well, we didn't get those views because we are somehow smarter than (or dumber) Americans but because there is something in our received culture that makes certain views more common.

Our history has shaped us differently. Although we share our official languages with France and with the UK, we are not them either. We have a separate culture from them. We didn't grow up in a vacuum. We have had threads about all these issues that make us view the world differently than the Americans - using 'indoor' voices, not wearing our religion on our sleeves, not being as big flag-wavers, etc, etc and think that where the friction comes in between Americans and Canadians is because we don't have a language barrier and people make the assumption (on both sides) that we will therefore share more views in common than we do. That's how you get threads, say, about some Americans thinking that it should be as simple as them wanting to do so, for them to move to Canada. Except for French Canada we don't have that natural language barrier to go with along with the border to emphasize that we are not them. With no insult intended to Americans.

None of which means that one can't have friendly feelings toward the other - there are jerks and anomalies everywhere but language is not the only way of defining a culture. If people were to look at me from the outside, they would see me as a part of the larger society but if they actually got to know me, I am Mennonite long before I am Canadian, no matter what language I speak, although I am sure that being a Canadian has also shaped my Mennonite identity (as an ethnic group).
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Old 08-15-2013, 11:44 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,756,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
First, I am always a bit confused when the word 'culture' comes up in a post because I am never sure if people are referring to popular culture (Justin Bieber/whatever is playing on the radio these days/TV shows), or high culture (the Europeans tending to sneer at the very idea of North America and 'culture' being used in one sentence), or the kind of ingrained culture which we all have simply by virtue of where we are born.

This is the wrong thread for this and I knew when I posted that some would disagree with me, which doesn't bother me in the slightest, but I am referring to the received culture we grow up with. I am not saying one culture (Canadian versus American) is better or worse (refreshing, isn't it?). I am saying that what people tend to feel is acceptable comes from the larger society. If Canadians have different views on gun ownership or gay marriage or how we talk or don't talk about religious faith publically, well, we didn't get those views because we are somehow smarter than (or dumber) Americans but because there is something in our received culture that makes certain views more common.

Our history has shaped us differently. Although we share our official languages with France and with the UK, we are not them either. We have a separate culture from them. We didn't grow up in a vacuum. We have had threads about all these issues that make us view the world differently than the Americans - using 'indoor' voices, not wearing our religion on our sleeves, not being as big flag-wavers, etc, etc and think that where the friction comes in between Americans and Canadians is because we don't have a language barrier and people make the assumption (on both sides) that we will therefore share more views in common than we do. That's how you get threads, say, about some Americans thinking that it should be as simple as them wanting to do so, for them to move to Canada. Except for French Canada we don't have that natural language barrier to go with along with the border to emphasize that we are not them. With no insult intended to Americans.

None of which means that one can't have friendly feelings toward the other - there are jerks and anomalies everywhere but language is not the only way of defining a culture. If people were to look at me from the outside, they would see me as a part of the larger society but if they actually got to know me, I am Mennonite long before I am Canadian, no matter what language I speak, although I am sure that being a Canadian has also shaped my Mennonite identity (as an ethnic group).
Well said.
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Old 08-16-2013, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,360,351 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
First, I am always a bit confused when the word 'culture' comes up in a post because I am never sure if people are referring to popular culture (Justin Bieber/whatever is playing on the radio these days/TV shows), or high culture (the Europeans tending to sneer at the very idea of North America and 'culture' being used in one sentence), or the kind of ingrained culture which we all have simply by virtue of where we are born.

This is the wrong thread for this and I knew when I posted that some would disagree with me, which doesn't bother me in the slightest, but I am referring to the received culture we grow up with. I am not saying one culture (Canadian versus American) is better or worse (refreshing, isn't it?). I am saying that what people tend to feel is acceptable comes from the larger society. If Canadians have different views on gun ownership or gay marriage or how we talk or don't talk about religious faith publically, well, we didn't get those views because we are somehow smarter than (or dumber) Americans but because there is something in our received culture that makes certain views more common.

Our history has shaped us differently. Although we share our official languages with France and with the UK, we are not them either. We have a separate culture from them. We didn't grow up in a vacuum. We have had threads about all these issues that make us view the world differently than the Americans - using 'indoor' voices, not wearing our religion on our sleeves, not being as big flag-wavers, etc, etc and think that where the friction comes in between Americans and Canadians is because we don't have a language barrier and people make the assumption (on both sides) that we will therefore share more views in common than we do. That's how you get threads, say, about some Americans thinking that it should be as simple as them wanting to do so, for them to move to Canada. Except for French Canada we don't have that natural language barrier to go with along with the border to emphasize that we are not them. With no insult intended to Americans.

None of which means that one can't have friendly feelings toward the other - there are jerks and anomalies everywhere but language is not the only way of defining a culture. If people were to look at me from the outside, they would see me as a part of the larger society but if they actually got to know me, I am Mennonite long before I am Canadian, no matter what language I speak, although I am sure that being a Canadian has also shaped my Mennonite identity (as an ethnic group).
Good post. I should have mentioned that I do think that statements about Canadians being identical to Americans are way too simplistic.

Still, without getting into debates about whether being similar to the US is a good or a bad thing, assuming there is a difference, wouldn't Canadians dressing more differently, eating more differently, entertaining and amusing themselves more differently, and doing a bunch of things differently (in their own way), not lead them to be more obviously different from their neighbours, instead of only being subtly different in a way that people really have dig to find?

And I say this not because I am advocating being different just for the sake of being different, but rather for the sake of being more... themselves.

Not necessarily my personal view - just throwing the question out there.

Is there anybody out there that wishes that life in Canada was more "Canadian" and who'd see this as a positive thing?
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Old 08-16-2013, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,756,192 times
Reputation: 7309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Good post. I should have mentioned that I do think that statements about Canadians being identical to Americans are way too simplistic.

Still, without getting into debates about whether being similar to the US is a good or a bad thing, assuming there is a difference, wouldn't Canadians dressing more differently, eating more differently, entertaining and amusing themselves more differently, and doing a bunch of things differently (in their own way), not lead them to be more obviously different from their neighbours, instead of only being subtly different in a way that people really have dig to find?

And I say this not because I am advocating being different just for the sake of being different, but rather for the sake of being more... themselves.

Not necessarily my personal view - just throwing the question out there.

Is there anybody out there that wishes that life in Canada was more "Canadian" and who'd see this as a positive thing?
If you just go by what people are wearing, type of music they listen to, movies they watch, and to some extent food, western culture is pretty similar in many ways. We are all wearing clothes made in a few factories in third world countries for the most part. Buying good made in China etc. Watching the same flat screen TV's as well. This is especially true over the last 25 years when simple things like TV's varied greatly from country to country.

Language does of course play a huge part in ones culture and certainly adding different music, theatre and film into that culture, but it's the 21st century. I easily listen to radio from all over the world as do many other, see more and more foreign films as well. The internet is shrinking the world like no other technology ever has.

I'm assuming by Canada you mean ROC, but Quebec does hold the same Canadian values that most Canadian cherish and feel are under attack.

What is it to be more Canadian? Well, staying an open minded, progressive society. This is not of course only a Canadian value, but it is a value is constantly feeling pressure. Sun News is an example. A very un-Canadian type of station. It's a copycat of FOX News south of the border.

Like a lot of the world, our identity and culture is always in danger of being overshadowed more and more by the U.S.A. That's why I support Canadian Content laws.

However English Canadian culture is alive. The most famous seem to be musicians/singers and actors. English speaking pop singers , whether they are from England, U.S., Australia, or Canada, when singing all seem to sing in the same mid-American accent. Many would not be able to tell where they are from until they spoke, but with english Canadians, many can not tell that it is a Canadian accent, and assume they are American. An phrase heard often is " Oh, I didn't know they were Canadian ".
So what I'm saying is that english Canadian culture in certain fields get hidden.
It's unfair, that a director like Alfred Hitchcock, even after making movies in Hollywood for 40 years is still considered English, but Canadian filmmakers in Hollywood are rarely seen as Canadian.

I'm glad Sun News ( Fox News North ) did not get support from the CRTC. That in a way is a move to protect the integrity ( what's left of it ) in Canadian News. If by being more Canadian means pushing back to keep certain standards, then I'm for it. If it means silly laws making people not to forget to spell colour with a u, then I'm not. This is not a dig at Quebec's language laws, which I support to a degree. Different kettle of fish.
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Old 08-16-2013, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,360,351 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Like a lot of the world, our identity and culture is always in danger of being overshadowed more and more by the U.S.A. That's why I support Canadian Content laws.

However English Canadian culture is alive. The most famous seem to be musicians/singers and actors. English speaking pop singers , whether they are from England, U.S., Australia, or Canada, when singing all seem to sing in the same mid-American accent. Many would not be able to tell where they are from until they spoke, but with english Canadians, many can not tell that it is a Canadian accent, and assume they are American. An phrase heard often is " Oh, I didn't know they were Canadian ".
So what I'm saying is that english Canadian culture in certain fields get hidden.
It's unfair, that a director like Alfred Hitchcock, even after making movies in Hollywood for 40 years is still considered English, but Canadian filmmakers in Hollywood are rarely seen as Canadian.
I know it's alive. Would it be beneficial for it to occupy a greater place in people's everyday lives?
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