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Old 08-16-2013, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post

I'm assuming by Canada you mean ROC, but Quebec does hold the same Canadian values that most Canadian cherish and feel are under attack.

.
Yes I was talking about the ROC.

Just wondering... is it a coincidence that the place where these so-called Canadian values seem to be most strongly believed in (gun control, social safety net, voting for social democratic parties, etc.) and defended, happens to be the place where U.S. influences in everyday popular culture are the least dominant?
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Old 08-16-2013, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I know it's alive. Would it be beneficial for it to occupy a greater place in people's everyday lives?
I'm not sure if it needs to occupy a greater place in ones life, it does need to be understood by Canadians. You lose your culture if you don't know what it is. Many of those who do use the phrase " oh, I didn't know they were Canadian, are Canadians.
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Old 08-16-2013, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Good post. I should have mentioned that I do think that statements about Canadians being identical to Americans are way too simplistic.

Still, without getting into debates about whether being similar to the US is a good or a bad thing, assuming there is a difference, wouldn't Canadians dressing more differently, eating more differently, entertaining and amusing themselves more differently, and doing a bunch of things differently (in their own way), not lead them to be more obviously different from their neighbours, instead of only being subtly different in a way that people really have dig to find?

And I say this not because I am advocating being different just for the sake of being different, but rather for the sake of being more... themselves.

Not necessarily my personal view - just throwing the question out there.

Is there anybody out there that wishes that life in Canada was more "Canadian" and who'd see this as a positive thing?
Well, since there isn't a Canadian national dress, I am not sure what you mean by dressing differently. People in the western world tend to dress pretty much the same. I don't think a German in Germany wearing blue jeans is less German for wearing blue jeans.

I don't find similarity in American and Canadian food strange at all given that our origins come from the same place. One might as well ask Americans to eat differently than Canadians as the reverse. Mennonites have their own cuisine, as for example do Jews, but if you look at the various dishes in or eastern Europe you will find that what Mennonites or Jews think of as uniquely their own, is known by different names with slightly different spins through eastern Europe. So I don't know what 'eating differently' means.

I grew up eating Mennonite food and I still make a large number of Mennonite dishes along with North American type standards such as French fries and hamburgers.

I was born in 1962 so what I remember is when we didn't talk about being Canadian. I think I kind of miss those days. And as a member of a specific ethnic group, what I associate with being Canadian was feeling you could be who you were, that you didn't have to give up part of yourself in order to assimilate into the mainstream. So I feel totally myself. But maybe those Canadians who haven't got strong roots in some other way perceive life differently. It would be hard for me to know that.

But you could never pick me out of a crowd and say, "By God, there's the horse and there's the buggy, and there's a long dress - she's Mennonite." You wouldn't know it at all. But I don't feel even slightly less culturally Mennonite for all that so I don't know why I would feel less Canadian for not sticking out more as Canadian.

What I see locally, and don't like at all, is American-style religion and some of the associated views of the religious right wing coming into Canada. But I am a pretty good tongue-biter. And I guess the other change I see is that people seem to want more stuff now and I don't like that either.

And I hasten to add that my observations could be regional.
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Old 08-16-2013, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,740,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Yes I was talking about the ROC.

Just wondering... is it a coincidence that the place where these so-called Canadian values seem to be most strongly believed in (gun control, social safety net, voting for social democratic parties, etc.) and defended, happens to be the place where U.S. influences in everyday popular culture are the least dominant?
It's an interesting question. I think in some ways Canadians look south, travel south etc and can see the good and the bad of U.S. laws and policies. Gun control seems like a no brainer to most Canadians, as does all the other stuff. We live in the reality of these policies, so when the crazy rhetoric comes out in the U.S. regarding things like gay marriage and healthcare, we see it for what it is. Lies and misinformation. That makes the Canadian stance to protect the things we have stronger. We are trying our best, not to make the same mistakes....but in some areas we have.
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Old 08-16-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: USA (dying to live in Canada)
1,034 posts, read 1,560,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
You know I love you netwit but I can't agree with this. When cross from France-Germany, France-UK, Germany-Netherlands, Germany-Denmark, Italy-France, Spain-Portugal, Spain-France, there is more than the language that changes. The way people dress, the food, the way they drive, the way they dress, the songs they sing, the music, the food... it changes.

The closest comparisons to Canada-US for me would be francophone Belgium or francophone Switzerland and France, and Argentina and Uruguay.
Add Sweden - Norway, Norway - Denmark and Sweden - Denmark to the list. Very similar language.
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Old 08-16-2013, 01:04 PM
 
4,456 posts, read 3,702,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack
Regarding the money issue, I wonder if things aren't so (superficially) identical in much of Canada that many Americans get lulled into thinking that they're not really in a foreign country.

I wonder if it happens in Mexico?


My experience is that they fall into three camps. The first and largest are Americans who know exactly where they are, use local currency and are wonderful tourists.

The second camp are those who know they aren't in the US and it's their first foreign country. They tend to ask the silly questions like " do you celebrate Christmas? "

The third camp are the ones that expect everything to be EXACTLY like the US. They ask questions like " who is your president?

You know I can see from your posts you do seem to be sensitive to the 'international' issues when one culture meets another culture. But as an American who has traveled to Canada and simply loves it, I just hope you don't feel that those Americans are disrespectful of your country. I'd just suggest as Will Rogers said, 'We are all ignorant but on different things"....;-)...

And on the currency issue we were up there recently and traded in bucks for Canadian. uh oh we got zinged real good. Next time we went to the hotel and they gave 'one-for-one' for us. No x-tra charge, no problem. We said 'Merci' and hit the town which was Quebec. We found it a very impressive city. Loved it. Much different than many years ago when we felt we were not treated well because we did not speak French. I lamented that state of affairs. Today, I commend Quebec and Canada in that we were treated with respect after a not too pleasant past experience. Attitudes clearly have changed. I hope the same applies to Canadians when they come here to America and they can interact well with the natives.
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Old 08-16-2013, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,740,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travric View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack
Regarding the money issue, I wonder if things aren't so (superficially) identical in much of Canada that many Americans get lulled into thinking that they're not really in a foreign country.

I wonder if it happens in Mexico?


My experience is that they fall into three camps. The first and largest are Americans who know exactly where they are, use local currency and are wonderful tourists.

The second camp are those who know they aren't in the US and it's their first foreign country. They tend to ask the silly questions like " do you celebrate Christmas? "

The third camp are the ones that expect everything to be EXACTLY like the US. They ask questions like " who is your president?

You know I can see from your posts you do seem to be sensitive to the 'international' issues when one culture meets another culture. But as an American who has traveled to Canada and simply loves it, I just hope you don't feel that those Americans are disrespectful of your country. I'd just suggest as Will Rogers said, 'We are all ignorant but on different things"....;-)...

And on the currency issue we were up there recently and traded in bucks for Canadian. uh oh we got zinged real good. Next time we went to the hotel and they gave 'one-for-one' for us. No x-tra charge, no problem. We said 'Merci' and hit the town which was Quebec. We found it a very impressive city. Loved it. Much different than many years ago when we felt we were not treated well because we did not speak French. I lamented that state of affairs. Today, I commend Quebec and Canada in that we were treated with respect after a not too pleasant past experience. Attitudes clearly have changed. I hope the same applies to Canadians when they come here to America and they can interact well with the natives.
If you are referring to me and not Acajack ( your post quotes me mainly ) about being sensitive, I would disagree if by sensitive you mean touchy. I am aware though and I am always considerate when travelling.

I'm sorry you got " zinged " but currency issues and exchange rates are something that someone really should check before their trip. Learning how not to get " zinged " is your responsibility, which I'm sure you know.

It's nice the hotel gave you the exchange on par, but I suspect this is ONLY because the exchange rate was either in their favour, or very close. I doubt very much it would happen if USD was worth 80 cents CDN. It's not just a courtesy thing, but a financial one.

I also understand the ignorance factor in everyone, however there is ignorance with curiosity and patience, and ignorance with rudeness and demands.

I have always said the VAST majority of American tourists in Canada are a joy and wonderful people, but there is a segment that has this " America is best " attitude that the curiosity and patience part of their ignorance is lacking.

Last edited by Natnasci; 08-16-2013 at 01:28 PM..
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Old 08-16-2013, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,937 posts, read 27,326,583 times
Reputation: 8602
Quote:
Originally Posted by travric View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack
Regarding the money issue, I wonder if things aren't so (superficially) identical in much of Canada that many Americans get lulled into thinking that they're not really in a foreign country.

I wonder if it happens in Mexico?

My experience is that they fall into three camps. The first and largest are Americans who know exactly where they are, use local currency and are wonderful tourists.

The second camp are those who know they aren't in the US and it's their first foreign country. They tend to ask the silly questions like " do you celebrate Christmas? "

The third camp are the ones that expect everything to be EXACTLY like the US. They ask questions like " who is your president?

You know I can see from your posts you do seem to be sensitive to the 'international' issues when one culture meets another culture. But as an American who has traveled to Canada and simply loves it, I just hope you don't feel that those Americans are disrespectful of your country. I'd just suggest as Will Rogers said, 'We are all ignorant but on different things"....;-)...

And on the currency issue we were up there recently and traded in bucks for Canadian. uh oh we got zinged real good. Next time we went to the hotel and they gave 'one-for-one' for us. No x-tra charge, no problem. We said 'Merci' and hit the town which was Quebec. We found it a very impressive city. Loved it. Much different than many years ago when we felt we were not treated well because we did not speak French. I lamented that state of affairs. Today, I commend Quebec and Canada in that we were treated with respect after a not too pleasant past experience. Attitudes clearly have changed. I hope the same applies to Canadians when they come here to America and they can interact well with the natives.
Nope. I don't have a negative view of American tourists. AT ALL. Most are very respectful and about the worst I would say (if that) is that some of them are a bit "naive" about the differences between the two countries. Nothing more than that.
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Old 08-16-2013, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,690 posts, read 6,532,688 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by travric View Post

And on the currency issue we were up there recently and traded in bucks for Canadian. uh oh we got zinged real good. Next time we went to the hotel and they gave 'one-for-one' for us. No x-tra charge, no problem. We said 'Merci' and hit the town which was Quebec. We found it a very impressive city. Loved it. Much different than many years ago when we felt we were not treated well because we did not speak French. I lamented that state of affairs. Today, I commend Quebec and Canada in that we were treated with respect after a not too pleasant past experience. Attitudes clearly have changed. I hope the same applies to Canadians when they come here to America and they can interact well with the natives.
I AM sorry you got ripped off - that would not be the norm in Canada where the US dollar is readily and mostly accepted. But for retail clerks in smaller businesses, not geared to tourists, it was usually a nightmare, with the clerk having no authority to decide what the exchange rate would be, and the person who did have the authority usually unavailable and everything, including the mood of the customer kind of going down that 'anything that can go wrong, will go wrong' way.
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Old 08-16-2013, 04:27 PM
 
Location: USA (dying to live in Canada)
1,034 posts, read 1,560,499 times
Reputation: 389
^^ During my sightseeing bus in Toronto, two Americans from Atlanta thought gasoline was sold in Quarter, but then when I told them gas is sold in Liters and Canada uses the metric system they were like "ohh that's why temperature everywhere is displayed in celsius" dahhh!

Americans needs to realize that ONLY America basically uses archaic imperial units
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