U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-19-2013, 10:32 AM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,287,313 times
Reputation: 6512

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Aliss if Quebec separated from Canada do you really think the ROC would continue to strive for some measure of bilingualism? what would be the point?
Well, I just think it's funny that our previous poster thinks the only French people live in Quebec. Is NB completely unworthy of a mention?

BC would likely not care except for historical value/prestige, not sure about the rest, I have only lived in QC and BC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-19-2013, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,962 posts, read 27,422,840 times
Reputation: 8626
NB is one third francophone and large areas of the province are almost 100% francophone. It's doubtful that all of the bilingualism measures would be eliminated there. At least in the short to medium term.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2013, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,962 posts, read 27,422,840 times
Reputation: 8626
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
They certainly threw that cultural heritage under the bus as Francophone Quebeckers these days dont like or identify with Canada
He said she said I suppose.

If you asked most people they'd say that that heritage was betrayed or at least shoved aside many times over the course of history by the Canadian government, and that the Canadian identity was appropriate by non-francophones with little concern or interest for what it truly meant, or even a little corner of the new identity that would allow the original francophone element of the Canadian identity to be itself.

I am truly a federalist in spite of what you think and I do frequently find the contemporary rah-rah-rah Canadian identity and its focus on a multicultural country with English as the common language (often eschewing the francophone element, or paying only token attention to it) a bit difficult to identify with at times.

At its origins, Quebec separatism is in a large part a defensive reaction to that perception of betrayal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2013, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,962 posts, read 27,422,840 times
Reputation: 8626
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
Also i think the indigenous native Indians might have trumped the French as the rightful first inhabitants of this area of the world.
If we were talking about the legitimacy of territorial claims, then we would be in agreement.

But we are talking about the moniker "Canadian".

Aboriginal groups never considered themselves to be Canadian. They were Mohawk, Iroquois, etc.

The name Canadian was invented to describe the people who settled and built New France.

That's the origin of the word.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2013, 11:21 AM
 
34,463 posts, read 41,589,827 times
Reputation: 29940
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
He said she said I suppose.

If you asked most people they'd say that that heritage was betrayed or at least shoved aside many times over the course of history by the Canadian government, and that the Canadian identity was appropriate by non-francophones with little concern or interest for what it truly meant, or even a little corner of the new identity that would allow the original francophone element of the Canadian identity to be itself.

I am truly a federalist in spite of what you think and I do frequently find the contemporary rah-rah-rah Canadian identity and its focus on a multicultural country with English as the common language (often eschewing the francophone element, or paying only token attention to it) a bit difficult to identify with at times.

At its origins, Quebec separatism is in a large part a defensive reaction to that perception of betrayal.
Must have been more than just Canadian government in on the suppression of the Francophone as they at one point controlled 3/4 of the entire north American land mass, doesnt seem to be going in a positive direction eh!.
As for you being a federalist? not sure what you mean by that,excuse my misconception as i've never once seen you have anything nice to say about Canada or Anglo Canadians but much Rah Rah in support of Quebec and its linguistic intolerance,Basically your ongoing opinion of the ROC is its full of Anglo suppressors,dominators and overlords who refuse to speak or learn French. Federalist?Pride for country? Proud Canadian?I aint seeing it AJ
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2013, 11:28 AM
 
34,463 posts, read 41,589,827 times
Reputation: 29940
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
If we were talking about the legitimacy of territorial claims, then we would be in agreement.

But we are talking about the moniker "Canadian".

Aboriginal groups never considered themselves to be Canadian. They were Mohawk, Iroquois, etc.

The name Canadian was invented to describe the people who settled and built New France.

That's the origin of the word.
Sounds simple, just go to some one elses land ,rename it then call it all yours,its the new law, the indigenous demographic is then relegated to hardly a mention and what ever they called their land is now irrelevant..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2013, 12:24 PM
 
34,463 posts, read 41,589,827 times
Reputation: 29940
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
NB is one third francophone and large areas of the province are almost 100% francophone. It's doubtful that all of the bilingualism measures would be eliminated there. At least in the short to medium term.
I think if Quebec separated from Canada bilingiualism would become a personal preference in the ROC rather than a government legislated affair. If you live in a place like NB with plenty of French the local governments could still post signs in French, other places that are predominantly English would probably lose what little bilingualism they currently have.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2013, 01:09 PM
pdw
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
1,473 posts, read 1,968,749 times
Reputation: 857
I think the problem with the mentality of separatism is how closed-off French Canadians are from the rest of the country because of the language barrier. If bilingualism is more heavily promoted throughout the country, this wouldn't be such an issue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2013, 01:30 PM
 
2,291 posts, read 3,942,503 times
Reputation: 2062
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
I think the problem with the mentality of separatism is how closed-off French Canadians are from the rest of the country because of the language barrier. If bilingualism is more heavily promoted throughout the country, this wouldn't be such an issue.
Some people on this board seem to take offense with many of my views (and Acajack's) when they relate to "the Quebec situation", yet we are bilingual.

The question of the promotion of bilingualism from an economic standpoint has already been discussed ad nauseam, so let me just state something fairly obvious: if the only goal is to increase the proportion of Canadians who speak both English and French, the overwhelming majority (as in 95%+) of the resources devoted to achieving that objective will be allocated outside Quebec. In other words IF one of the 'solitudes' is not bilingual enough, its constituents reside outside Quebec.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2013, 02:03 PM
 
34,463 posts, read 41,589,827 times
Reputation: 29940
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdw View Post
I think the problem with the mentality of separatism is how closed-off French Canadians are from the rest of the country because of the language barrier. If bilingualism is more heavily promoted throughout the country, this wouldn't be such an issue.
I dont see the point in being bilingual just for bilingualisms sake, 100% of my friends and family living outside Quebec are unilingual Anglos, theres absolutely no viable reason for them to become bilingual.they dont plan on ever coming to Quebec, there is no outlet for French in their day to day lives,they are English in an English environment and they only need to speak English, sure they could study any one of the worlds languages for personal pleasure but English is all they need to survive..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top