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Old 08-24-2013, 09:46 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Are you thinking about the Spanish-American war? What makes you think the United States wants Quebec?
Lot of natural resources in Quebec,and if Quebecs plan for independence didnt work out as planned you can be sure America would be offered those natural resources at bargain basement prices .
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Old 08-24-2013, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Summit, NJ
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Could it work like, say, Finland and the EU? Finland, less populous and much smaller than Quebec, is a sovereign nation that seems to be doing fine, but their membership in the EU helps their economy in a major way.
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Old 08-24-2013, 02:10 PM
 
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Something I've never heard discussed: If Quebec separated, then what would happen to the Francophone people in the New Brunswick border area, and in Manitoba?

If New Brunswick and Manitoba were to stay in Canada after Quebec independence, then these Francophone people would become a very tiny minority in an overwhelmingly Anglophone nation - a nation that would be tempted to abandon its official bilingualism policy. Their minority language would be imperiled like the Louisiana Cajuns. Unless the northern part of New Brunswick were to join Quebec (would that be legal under the Constitution?)
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Old 08-24-2013, 02:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
Something I've never heard discussed: If Quebec separated, then what would happen to the Francophone people in the New Brunswick border area, and in Manitoba?

If New Brunswick and Manitoba were to stay in Canada after Quebec independence, then these Francophone people would become a very tiny minority in an overwhelmingly Anglophone nation - a nation that would be tempted to abandon its official bilingualism policy. Their minority language would be imperiled like the Louisiana Cajuns. Unless the northern part of New Brunswick were to join Quebec (would that be legal under the Constitution?)
I doubt anything would happen to those Francophones outside Quebec as they are already tiny minorities and probably used to doing most of their daily routine in English .
However if Quebec did separate i cant see the point of Canada remaining a pretend Bilingual country and the small bilingual concessions offered to Francophones out side Quebec would probably be scrapped. and those Francophones living outside Quebec who arent happy with the irrelevance of their Francophone culture in the ROC will now have the opportunity to move to the total Francophone demographic that would be the new country of Quebec.
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Old 08-24-2013, 05:41 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Are you thinking about the Spanish-American war? What makes you think the United States wants Quebec?
No, I had not been thinking of the Spanish-American war, I'd been thinking more along the lines of the war of 1812 and also when USA made the Alaska purchase in 1867 with the future intent of also annexing what is now British Columbia. However, since you mention it, the Spanish-American war is a good example of American interference:

Quote:

Spanish

The Spanish–American War was a conflict in 1898 between Spain and the United States, effectively the result of American intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American attacks on Spain's Pacific possessions led to involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately to the Philippine–American War.[8]
Revolts against Spanish rule had occurred for some years in Cuba. There had been war scares before, as in the Virginius Affair in 1873. In the late 1890s, American public opinion was agitated by anti-Spanish propaganda led by journalists such as Joseph Pulitzer and William Hearst which used yellow journalism to criticize Spanish administration of Cuba. After the mysterious sinking of the American battleship Maine in Havana harbor, political pressures from the Democratic Party and certain industrialists pushed the administration of Republican President William McKinley into a war he had wished to avoid.[9] Compromise was sought by Spain, but rejected by the United States which sent an ultimatum to Spain demanding it surrender control of Cuba. First Madrid, then Washington, formally declared war.
As to why America might want Quebec - if America was given the opportunity to seize it, why wouldn't America or any other country want all that huge expanse of land and all those natural resources and additional access and opportunity to domination of the northwest passage?

I'm not saying that America would just out of the blue try to occupy or annex Quebec if Quebec becomes a sovereign country but I'm quite certain that America would be quick to take all the economic advantages it could of the new country. And, since Quebec wouldn't have a military force of its own America would be sure to offer "protection" and then take up military occupancy within the country to "protect" it from foreign invaders in America's own best interests.

What I was talking about in my first post was about what would happen if the new country Quebec tried to get uppity. If Quebec gained sovereignty and then tried to cause interference and troubles in free trade, passage and commerce for Canada and USA then there's no doubt in my mind that USA would step in and completely take over Quebec. Quebec would be powerless to do anything about it and having abandoned Canada and the Commonwealth of Nations it would no longer have the protection and other advantages that are presently offered by Canada and the Commonwealth.

No matter which way I look at it, if Quebec gains sovereignty it will be Quebec's and Canada's loss and America's gain and Quebec won't be as "sovereign" as it thought it would be.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 08-24-2013 at 06:32 PM..
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Old 08-24-2013, 08:11 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
It's funny you should post something as inane as this and then say that Quebec separatists are not very smart.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I am against Quebec independence as you know and I do agree it would be disruptive to some degree but on the other hand the vast majority of people seriously underestimate how ''business as usual'' things would still be post-independence.

Israel still trades with Palestine. Armenia trades with Turkey and Azerbaijan. Money talks. BS walks.
Would you stay?

.
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Old 08-24-2013, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Would you stay?

.
Yes, I would stay unless my family's economic situation became untenable.

There are few reasons for this:

- Canada without Quebec is not Canada for me. And if you had Canada-sans-Quebec on one side and an independent Quebec as a binary choice, then believe it or not an independent Quebec is closer to ''Canada'' to me than the remaining ROC would be.

- As my family is francophone, I am not comfortable or confident about how francophones would be treated in a Canada-sans-Quebec. I was in living in Ontario during the Meech and 1995 referendum period, and what I witnessed was not very reassuring. And Quebec did not even separate at that time.

In the unlikely event that Quebec might become independent, and things not work out in Quebec for us, I would probably look to another country other than Canada-sans-Quebec for resettlement. There'd be too much baggage for me to feel comfortable raising a francophone family in the ROC.

Sorry.
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Old 08-24-2013, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
I doubt anything would happen to those Francophones outside Quebec as they are already tiny minorities and probably used to doing most of their daily routine in English .
Their daily routine is in English, generally. All the Francophones I know locally can speak English quite well, with hardly a trace of an accent. Of course, they also speak French fluently, and do so in their homes. But they rarely do outside the home, since few would understand them.

Still, just for fun, once a Francophone friend tried to get service in French at a Service Canada office here in Alberta. He was surprised at the fact that he could be served in French, and he later said, "The person I dealt with spoke perfect French."
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Old 08-25-2013, 04:33 AM
 
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There are plenty of unilingual francophones in New Brunswick that don't speak any English or use it in their daily life.
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Old 08-25-2013, 05:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
- As my family is francophone, I am not comfortable or confident about how francophones would be treated in a Canada-sans-Quebec. I was in living in Ontario during the Meech and 1995 referendum period, and what I witnessed was not very reassuring. And Quebec did not even separate at that time.

.
As an Anglophone living in Quebec i'd also worry about how the remaining Anglophone demographic would be treated in a separate Quebec, as a separate country of Quebec the ruling elite could impose any linguistic legislation it deemed necessary to achieve its linguistic purity ideals,Can you say fait accompli?
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