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Old 09-03-2013, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Montreal
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Is it my understanding that Canada was invited to the G6 in 1976 (and thus to become the G7) largely because of Gerald Ford's affinity to Canada (and also, for that matter, Pierre E. Trudeau's sensitivity to help less-developed countries)? Or because it was a Cold War or North Atlanticist/NATO flourish? Or because the US wanted to make a North American counterweight to France inviting Italy the previous year? Was any of that the reason for Canada being invited to what would be the G7 more than because Canada's total GDP has been one of the highest in the world?
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Old 09-04-2013, 09:37 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Default Canada being invited to G6/G7 in 1976

Quote:
Originally Posted by yofie View Post
Is it my understanding that Canada was invited to the G6 in 1976 (and thus to become the G7) largely because of Gerald Ford's affinity to Canada (and also, for that matter, Pierre E. Trudeau's sensitivity to help less-developed countries)? Or because it was a Cold War or North Atlanticist/NATO flourish? Or because the US wanted to make a North American counterweight to France inviting Italy the previous year? Was any of that the reason for Canada being invited to what would be the G7 more than because Canada's total GDP has been one of the highest in the world?
I am kind of curious in this question myself.

A total guess but it must have been a feeling of being outnumbered as the United States and Japan were now meeting with four European countries; Britain, France, Germany and Italy. Adding Canada might have been seen as adding a little balance, especially for North America.

Besides the United States, I can see the UK as wanting Canada in also.
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Old 09-05-2013, 05:54 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️
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Here is the answer according to the snip from an article by Thomas S. Axworthy published in the Canadian Encyclopedia.
G8: The Most Exclusive Club in the World - The Canadian Encyclopedia

Quote:

"....... But a major issue arose - who would be invited to be a member of this new club?

Invitations were extended to France's partners in the G-5 economic consultative group, and as a neighbourly gesture, Giscard d'Estaing also invited Italy. Canada, however, was left out. France's decision may have been a continuation of the Gaullist campaign to diminish Canada that had begun with General Charles de Gaulle's "Vive Quebec Libre" speech in Montreal. Or France may not have wanted to set a precedent for other middle powers, but the French president was adamant - No Canada!

Prime Minister Trudeau, however, launched a quick and effective counteroffensive. At that time, Canada had a larger GNP than Italy and we still had significant military and foreign aid assets. In short, Canada then had more relative capability than we do today. Trudeau's good personal relations with the leaders of that time also came into play. James Callaghan of Great Britain intervened with France, Chancellor Helmut Schmidt told the French he would not attend any future meetings unless Canada participated, and the Japanese made it known that another non-European voice would be welcome.

But Canada's key friend was President Gerald Ford of the United States. As a longtime representative of Michigan in the Congress, Ford knew Canada well. When he became president, through the accident of the Watergate scandal in 1974, Ford and Trudeau immediately hit it off. President Ford was irate about Canada's exclusion, and he briefly considered refusing to attend the summit. A more positive approach, however, was chosen. The United States was to host the next summit, and just as France had invited Italy in 1975, the United States would invite Canada to attend the 1976 summit in Puerto Rico. Once invited, President Ford concluded, you would not be excluded in the future. So it has proved........ "

.... continued .....
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Old 09-06-2013, 09:43 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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I think Zoisite pretty much answered the question.
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