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Old 09-08-2013, 07:31 PM
 
5,660 posts, read 5,637,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruSan View Post
Well see right there is where I misread you. You see, you said "I started a thread a several months ago about Lexus 350......"

I naturally assumed you had received all the relevant info you needed to deal with your "stupid and shortsighted" query from that thread and were not simply wishing to go over the same ground again related to cars built in Canada.

That is why I focused on your "small dumpy little homes", the "stupid and shortsighted" and the huge "government industrial complex" with my rejoinder.

I guess I was wrong. So either you weren't satisfied with the answers you got "several months ago", people could not be bothered answering a query posed with your arrogantly patronizing descriptors, or you just want to chum the waters a second time for your entertainment.

I guess you're not done trolling after all. Carry on.
Quick question, just to be clear: Is "trolling" any topic that you either disagree with, or don't wish to discuss?

My point is that because of high taxes and a HUGE Government Industrial Complex millions of dollars a year that could stimulate the Ontario economy are unnecessarily stimulating the economies of Buffalo and the Detroit suburbs. Again, the RX 350 is made in Cambridge, but is cheaper for a Canadian to buy in America. Does that make sense to you? Honest answer please.

 
Old 09-08-2013, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,184 posts, read 1,759,319 times
Reputation: 2664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
I started a thread several months ago about Lexus RX350 being built in Cambridge, Ont. yet they cost so much more money in Canada than in the States, that thousands of Southern Ontarians cross the border to buy them in Buffalo and Detroit.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
My point is that because of high taxes and a HUGE Government Industrial Complex millions of dollars a year that could stimulate the Ontario economy are unnecessarily stimulating the economies of Buffalo and the Detroit suburbs.
Do you have a reputable cite for your claim that "thousands of southern Ontarians" are buying cars in Buffalo and Detroit; and that they are spending "millions of dollars" in those cities?

Do some Canadians buy a car in the US? Sure, some do. Do thousands of Canadians spend millions of dollars buying cars in the US? I doubt it. It doesn't look like it's as simple as driving it off a Buffalo dealer's lot, and heading home to Toronto:

Canada Border Service Agency: Importing a Vehicle into Canada

Registrar of Imported Vehicles: Cost Considerations

Alberta Motor Association (part of the Canadian Automobile Association): Importing a vehicle

As I said, some Canadians buy vehicles in the US; but I'm sure that, based on any duties and excise at the border, additional costs (e.g. having the car altered to fit Canadian specs, such as calibrating it for kilometers, and fitting it with daytime running lights), and the hoops one needs to jump through (paying for inspections, and being unable to run it until it passes), most Canadians would rather buy from a Canadian dealer. It sure isn't worth my time, trouble, or money to buy in the US.
 
Old 09-08-2013, 09:05 PM
 
5,660 posts, read 5,637,211 times
Reputation: 2883
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Do you have a reputable cite for your claim that "thousands of southern Ontarians" are buying cars in Buffalo and Detroit; and that they are spending "millions of dollars" in those cities?

Do some Canadians buy a car in the US? Sure, some do. Do thousands of Canadians spend millions of dollars buying cars in the US? I doubt it. It doesn't look like it's as simple as driving it off a Buffalo dealer's lot, and heading home to Toronto:

Canada Border Service Agency: Importing a Vehicle into Canada

Registrar of Imported Vehicles: Cost Considerations

Alberta Motor Association (part of the Canadian Automobile Association): Importing a vehicle

As I said, some Canadians buy vehicles in the US; but I'm sure that, based on any duties and excise at the border, additional costs (e.g. having the car altered to fit Canadian specs, such as calibrating it for kilometers, and fitting it with daytime running lights), and the hoops one needs to jump through (paying for inspections, and being unable to run it until it passes), most Canadians would rather buy from a Canadian dealer. It sure isn't worth my time, trouble, or money to buy in the US.
My point is specifically the Lexus RX, which is made in Cambridge, Ontario, but retails for several thousand more in Canada (the country in which it is made) then it does in the States. Even with the import tax, Canadians still come out ahead buying that vehicle across the border.
 
Old 09-08-2013, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,184 posts, read 1,759,319 times
Reputation: 2664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
Even with the import tax, Canadians still come out ahead buying that vehicle across the border.
Well, under NAFTA, there is no import tax if the vehicle is built in North America. There would be HST if you were importing it into Ontario, an excise tax on the air conditioning, all the conversions to Canadian specs (a Lexus purchased for the US would be calibrated in miles, for example), the necessary inspections (see the RIV site, linked above), and other time-and-money-consuming considerations. Still sounds like a lot of time and trouble.

Of course, if you really, really, really want a Lexus RX, maybe it's worth it. Me, I'm happy with my Chevy that was built in (I believe) Texas, and purchased from a Canadian dealer. It was ready to drive anywhere in Canada when I drove it off the lot, and needed no additional conversions or inspections before it could be insured and registered. Anything I paid over what I might have paid at a US dealer, I consider good value for not having to pay all the extra fees to various governments and governmental agencies, and spending my time and money jumping through all the hoops that importing a vehicle to Canada requires.
 
Old 09-08-2013, 09:49 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,218,175 times
Reputation: 11624
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Well, under NAFTA, there is no import tax if the vehicle is built in North America. There would be HST if you were importing it into Ontario, an excise tax on the air conditioning, all the conversions to Canadian specs (a Lexus purchased for the US would be calibrated in miles, for example), the necessary inspections (see the RIV site, linked above), and other time-and-money-consuming considerations. Still sounds like a lot of time and trouble.

Of course, if you really, really, really want a Lexus RX, maybe it's worth it. Me, I'm happy with my Chevy that was built in (I believe) Texas, and purchased from a Canadian dealer. It was ready to drive anywhere in Canada when I drove it off the lot, and needed no additional conversions or inspections before it could be insured and registered. Anything I paid over what I might have paid at a US dealer, I consider good value for not having to pay all the extra fees to various governments and governmental agencies, and spending my time and money jumping through all the hoops that importing a vehicle to Canada requires.
I think the OP didn't realize the extra effort one has to go through in importing a car in North America, even one sold in the US. We do the same thing, too, to cars built in Canada for sale in Canada and not the US (not meeting NHTSA and EPA specs, which are regulations partly lobbied by car manufacturers here to protect their domestic dealer network, amongst other reasons). Also, let's say Canadians buy a Chevy Sonic in Detroit. That money is going to pay the workers at that dealer, some will go to the workers who built the car (let's say in Ontario), but the remainder goes to General Motors in Detroit, not General Motors Canada in Oshawa, ON. So GM Canada misses out on that sale. So, it is not unheard of for automobile subsidiaries to lobby their home government for restrictions on importation of foreign vehicles, even ones that are built by their parent company. Boiling it down to simple terms: it's protectionism

Last edited by theunbrainwashed; 09-08-2013 at 09:58 PM..
 
Old 09-08-2013, 10:07 PM
 
5,660 posts, read 5,637,211 times
Reputation: 2883
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
Well, under NAFTA, there is no import tax if the vehicle is built in North America. There would be HST if you were importing it into Ontario, an excise tax on the air conditioning, all the conversions to Canadian specs (a Lexus purchased for the US would be calibrated in miles, for example), the necessary inspections (see the RIV site, linked above), and other time-and-money-consuming considerations. Still sounds like a lot of time and trouble.

Of course, if you really, really, really want a Lexus RX, maybe it's worth it. Me, I'm happy with my Chevy that was built in (I believe) Texas, and purchased from a Canadian dealer. It was ready to drive anywhere in Canada when I drove it off the lot, and needed no additional conversions or inspections before it could be insured and registered. Anything I paid over what I might have paid at a US dealer, I consider good value for not having to pay all the extra fees to various governments and governmental agencies, and spending my time and money jumping through all the hoops that importing a vehicle to Canada requires.
I don't know what this means, sorry for my ignorance. I do know that with a simple click of a mouse in the navigation system, an RX 350 can show miles or kilometers. Are you saying that there are specific differences between an RX 350 made in Cambridge, Ont. that is sold at a dealership in Canada, versus the same vehicle sold in Buffalo? Thanks
 
Old 09-08-2013, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Aloverton
6,564 posts, read 12,327,423 times
Reputation: 10018
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
I don't know anyone who says this; you're confusing "no government" with a limited government that controls every aspect of our lives from cradle to grave. I believe that YOU know what is best for you, not some elite bureaucrat.
Come to Idaho sometime. A lot of people here quite openly say they don't like any government. Of course, most of them can't define socialism, and most of them won't hesitate to take advantage of government benefits, but plenty of them say it. Whether they really mean it, when push comes to shove, is another question entirely. Hint: the Veterans' Administration is a good example of socialism, since government owns and operates the means of production. Should we spend less money on that socialist program, and just hope that charity picks up the tab to care for a Marine sergeant who lost both his legs and half his mind fighting a war for corporations? You can tell that Marine that if you dare. Just best not do it within his reach. His country owes him care and I don't think Aetna's going to step up--at least not without making him pay.

Canada is run as Canada is because that's how most Canadians like and want it. It's that simple. They don't feel they need to consult us about that, and given how much we pay for how little we get in return when you do the full payroll and tax equation, I can't blame them. They have less crime, live longer and are generally happier than we are, with corporations having less power to screw them over; I'd have a very big challenge trying to convince them our way is better for anyone who isn't independently wealthy. I think it's pretty amusing, albeit a bit embarrassing, when the monthly "how can you people stand socialism????????????" US troll shows up here, with the same basic message underlying the text each time: "Murrica = better, so why do you insist on being different?"

No one who can't define socialism has any business even bandying the word. They'll just look silly.
 
Old 09-08-2013, 10:25 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,218,175 times
Reputation: 11624
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sophiasmommy View Post
I don't know what this means, sorry for my ignorance. I do know that with a simple click of a mouse in the navigation system, an RX 350 can show miles or kilometers. Are you saying that there are specific differences between an RX 350 made in Cambridge, Ont. that is sold at a dealership in Canada, versus the same vehicle sold in Buffalo? Thanks
Canadian cars only have kilometers printed on it. One of my friends from Kitchener met with me some years ago, and his Toyota Camry was exclusively marked in km. Not that you're gonna read this, seeing as I'm on ignore since I call you out on your silliness
 
Old 09-08-2013, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
8 posts, read 27,184 times
Reputation: 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by j_k_k View Post
Come to Idaho sometime.
Is Boise a relatively progressive city? I know Obama lost Ada county in both elections, but the mayor is a Democrat. I'd love to visit sometime though I hear it's very scenic up there.
 
Old 09-08-2013, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,184 posts, read 1,759,319 times
Reputation: 2664
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
Canadian cars only have kilometers printed on it. One of my friends from Kitchener met with me some years ago, and his Toyota Camry was exclusively marked in km. Not that you're gonna read this, seeing as I'm on ignore since I call you out on your silliness
In fairness, some cars (I'll assume that the Lexus RX 350 is one) allow the speedometer and odometer display to be viewed in either kilometers or miles; and usually, all it takes is the press of a button (I rented one such car once, and got a kick out of driving in MPH in Canada). But many others don't.

In addition, there are other, less obvious, examples. The oil pressure on my dash is indicated in kilopascals, and my fuel gauge has symbols instead of "E" and "F" (cars in Canada must be bilingual, and symbols often overcome this challenge). You cannot indicate anything in English unless it is also in French, so even something like "passenger airbag system on," which may well be indicated in those words on a car sold in the US, is indicated by a symbol. As a result, for a car to be legal in Canada, you must go to a shop and have the dashboard and other displays changed over before it will be allowed to be registered and insured.
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