U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-18-2007, 06:08 AM
 
66 posts, read 15,714 times
Reputation: 14
Arrow ***The Accent Thread*** - ALL accent/speech/language posts go here!

I'm trying to undertand what a Canadian accent is?

I know accents from: Newfoudland, Nova Scotia and Quebec. But I'm more concerned with the rest of Canada especially Ontario.

I keep hearing 'aboot'. We don't say that! I don't know where that comes from, maybe East Coast may from like 2 people?

When I hear accents from the US, I think Ontarians anyhow, are most similiar to Californians. (Am I dreaming on this one?)

I think we have strong 'T' at the end of words like skatTUH (for skate) and strong 'S' at the end of words like houSSSE (for house). What else?

I read on Wikipedia that Canadians say 'cot' and 'caught' the same. I never heard of that in my life! - ie. that they should be pronunced differently?

Last edited by elnina; 07-18-2014 at 04:36 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-18-2007, 06:16 AM
 
82 posts, read 432,020 times
Reputation: 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by From KW View Post
I'm trying to undertand what a Canadian accent is?

I know accents from: Newfoudland, Nova Scotia and Quebec. But I'm more concerned with the rest of Canada especially Ontario.

I keep hearing 'aboot'. We don't say that! I don't know where that comes from, maybe East Coast may from like 2 people?

When I hear accents from the US, I think Ontarians anyhow, are most similiar to Californians. (Am I dreaming on this one?)

I think we have strong 'T' at the end of words like skatTUH (for skate) and strong 'S' at the end of words like houSSSE (for house). What else?

I read on Wikipedia that Canadians say 'cot' and 'caught' the same. I never heard of that in my life! - ie. that they should be pronunced differently?
Yep, we've got an accent, and its quite mild, I'm told, but distinct. We have "rounded O's" is what I've been told, but I've heard it enough from various people from different parts of the US to the point of believing it. The rounded o's is where the aboot thing comes from, we pronounce about "abowt", where as most northern Americans (Probably north eastern in particular) seem to say "abaut" for example.
The best way is to ask someone from the South who themself has a heavy local accent, and they'll give you the particulars of how you "dont quite sound like a yanky...".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 08:01 AM
 
7,551 posts, read 10,663,904 times
Reputation: 2888
Its akin to certain Midwestern accents in the States or vice versa. There are certain phrases Canadians use like "eh" and "you know." And there is often a certain way Canadians say things which I cannot really describe in writing. Nothing drastic or horrid about any of it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 08:59 AM
 
137 posts, read 585,817 times
Reputation: 109
KW - My ex was from Ontario and I am from California. When we first met (in California) he asked me "how does everyone know I'm Canadian"? His accent was very close to mine with the exception of those things that gave him away, and yes mainly the ouwt and abowt, his accent on things like 'garage' pronounced 'garrige', and way too many ehs in every sentence. He couldn't hear it until I pointed it out.

Now as far as cot and caught go, I never knew there was a difference either!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 10:03 AM
 
66 posts, read 15,714 times
Reputation: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by momma4 View Post

Now as far as cot and caught go, I never knew there was a difference either!
Well then I don't fell so bad. Sounds like this may be a North american thing rather than a Canadian thing.

Phonological history of English low back vowels - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 15,170,715 times
Reputation: 3242
General Canadian English is maybe 98% similar to general American speech as spoken on TV, many Hollywood movies and sometimes described as "news anchor speech." (a sound some Americans go to "speech therapy" to gain this accent and/or lose their regional accent)

I've heard Americans would say "about" typically in two distinct clear syllables "Ah-bowt" (?) while Canadians typically say a 'dipthong' making the second syllable like a combination of bent vowels. I'll try to type it out the way I'm most familiar with:

"Ah-Ba-wu-OOT"

*Strong or hard sounds are in capitals, soft sounds in lower case. Also soft sounds are said quickly and blended into the hard sounds. It is not spoken in four syllables, but the "Ah" is a quick, distinct syllable, while the "Ba-wu-OOT" is a spoken as a slightly longer syllable with the 'bent' vowels (dipthong) sound.

To a native speaker, this "ou" sound sounds like combination of "ow" and "oo" sounds.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 15,170,715 times
Reputation: 3242
Quote:
Originally Posted by momma4 View Post
his accent on things like 'garage' pronounced 'garrige',

Now as far as cot and caught go, I never knew there was a difference either!
I've never heard garage pronounced with an "I" sound, at least around here.
I'm used to garage sounding "Ger-ajj"

However some people I've met here have an accent that sound like they might be slightly influenced by Native Canadians (local "Indians")

Example: Words like "park" sounding more like "perk"

Cot and Caught:

I believe that only "East Coast" Americans (coastal Northeast) have accents where they actually pronounce them differently. Americans, is that correct?
I am also a little confused, but mostly because I don't think I've heard any examples of how those two words could be pronounced.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, BC
1,040 posts, read 3,924,858 times
Reputation: 986
Honestly?

The whole "aboot" thing comes from an exaggeration.

You're right - no Canadian ever says "aboot", unless they're purposely mocking the stereotype... or unless they're Scottish!

"Aboot" comes from Americans hearing Canadians pronounce about as "a-boat". Yet to American ears, for reasons unknown to me, they exaggerate it to "aboot".

Then comedy shows/movies have latched onto "aboot" that it's become somewhat of a stereotype that Canadians say this.

Wiki up "Canadian speech" or "Canadian English" and everything is explained there.

I should also mention, not every Canadian says "a-boat" - it depends where you are in the country. The country is 6 time zones wide and there are a variety of different local pronunciations that even Canadians are unaware of.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Lincoln, NE
167 posts, read 218,824 times
Reputation: 130
Where I grew up in central Georgia, there was a distinction between cot and caught with local southerners. Caught was pronounced something like "cawt", which is similar sounding to the stereotypical pronunciation in the south of "dawg" for dog. However, I notice this distinction less and less, as so many people across the state hail from somewhere else, which influences all dialects.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Perth, Western Australia
9,598 posts, read 15,170,715 times
Reputation: 3242
Quote:
Originally Posted by geog-fanatic View Post
Where I grew up in central Georgia, there was a distinction between cot and caught with local southerners. Caught was pronounced something like "cawt", which is similar sounding to the stereotypical pronunciation in the south of "dawg" for dog.
How would a southerner or Georgian pronounce "cot" ?
Which words have that sound?

I've heard the "aw" sound in words like "awn" "dawg" "tawlk" etc. in the Carolinas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top