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Old 02-05-2014, 08:27 PM
 
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Sorry if this sounds naive, but was their ever a point when the thought of canada being a french country was considered? thanks
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Old 02-05-2014, 08:47 PM
 
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Originally Posted by EkriirkEHere View Post
Sorry if this sounds naive, but was their ever a point when the thought of canada being a french country was considered? thanks
It was not just "considered", "Canada" actually referred to a French (and Aboriginal) area until the Seven Years War (i.e. French and Indian War if you're American) and the Treaty of Paris (1763). Back then "Canada" basically referred to the inhabited part of what is today the Province of Quebec, or if you want to include its dependencies (Les Pays d'en Haut), it also included Southern Ontario and areas around the Great Lakes, but except for the St. Lawrence Valley, those areas were very sparsely settled.
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Old 02-05-2014, 08:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by barneyg View Post
It was not just "considered", "Canada" actually referred to a French (and Aboriginal) area until the Seven Years War (i.e. French and Indian War if you're American) and the Treaty of Paris (1763). Back then "Canada" basically referred to the inhabited part of what is today the Province of Quebec, or if you want to include its dependencies (Les Pays d'en Haut), it also included Southern Ontario and areas around the Great Lakes, but except for the St. Lawrence Valley, those areas were very sparsely settled.
Is it true that most of what is now canada inhabited by people of french nationality pre american revolution?
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Old 02-05-2014, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Windsor, Ontario, Canada
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Originally Posted by EkriirkEHere View Post
Is it true that most of what is now canada inhabited by people of french nationality pre american revolution?


Most of what was Canada and the US belonged to France.




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Old 02-06-2014, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Colorado
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EkriirkEHere, Canada was a French colonial country much like America was originally a British colonial country. However, Canada was conquered by the British Empire during the seven years war. This is why Québec, which was site of the original Canadian towns and settlements, is French speaking. What we call Nova Scotia was called Acadie by the French and also possessed the original Canadian settlements; however, when Acadie was conquered, the British deported the population and replaced it with British migrants.

So yes, Canada would have been a "French" country if the British had not conquered it and settled much of the land with their people.
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Old 02-06-2014, 09:11 AM
 
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Canada was French until the end of the French and Indian War.
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Old 02-06-2014, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by EkriirkEHere View Post
Is it true that most of what is now canada inhabited by people of french nationality pre american revolution?
To follow up on what others have said, Britain started to take over France's most important North American possessions permanently starting with Acadia in 1755.

At that point, the only significant British origin population in what is today Canada would have been in Newfoundland, however Newfoundland did not join Canada until 1949.

Subsequent to the conquest of Acadia in 1755, British settlers started arriving in what are today the three Maritime provinces.

New France (much larger than present-day Quebec and also Acadia, but at that time with a significant population only in the St. Lawrence valley - and almost all of it French), fell in the early 1760s.

There was after that a little bit of British settlement but the anglo population really started to arrive in high numbers around the time of and after the American Revolution.

The Loyalists went to what it is today Ontario (then very sparsely populated), the Eastern Townships of Quebec (south of the territory that the French had settled) and also in the Maritimes (especially New Brunswick).
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Old 02-06-2014, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Another thing worth mentioning is that the "Canadian" (or Canadien) identity remained a definer mostly associated with French Canadians a long time after the Conquest in 1763.

The British settlers identified themselves as British, English, Scottish, etc. for quite some time after their settlement on Canadian territory. Even the "founder" of Canada, Sir John A. Macdonald, who lived 100 years after the Conquest, was allegedly not very fond of the "Canadian" appellation, and much preferred to be known as "British".

This is why many things quintessentially Canadian can be fairly strongly associated with the French fact of the country. For example, the national anthem O Canada is a song originally written in French for St-Jean-Baptiste day. The Montreal Canadiens hockey team has that E instead of an A because it refers to French Canadians primarily.

And there are a whole bunch of other examples.
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Old 02-06-2014, 10:20 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Another thing worth mentioning is that the "Canadian" (or Canadien) identity remained a definer mostly associated with French Canadians a long time after the Conquest in 1763.

The British settlers identified themselves as British, English, Scottish, etc. for quite some time after their settlement on Canadian territory. Even the "founder" of Canada, Sir John A. Macdonald, who lived 100 years after the Conquest, was allegedly not very fond of the "Canadian" appellation, and much preferred to be known as "British".

This is why many things quintessentially Canadian can be fairly strongly associated with the French fact of the country. For example, the national anthem O Canada is a song originally written in French for St-Jean-Baptiste day. The Montreal Canadiens hockey team has that E instead of an A because it refers to French Canadians primarily.

And there are a whole bunch of other examples.

Is Detroit a french name?
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Old 02-06-2014, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
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Originally Posted by EkriirkEHere View Post
Is Detroit a french name?
Yes, it means "strait" in French. This area and a large part of the midwestern US was also part of New France, but French settlement in the area was quite limited.
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