U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Is Quebec Independence a Legitimate Movement?
Yes 116 65.91%
No 60 34.09%
Voters: 176. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-22-2019, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,722 posts, read 11,225,194 times
Reputation: 10453

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post

Just being realistic here. I actually do feel personally that fundamentally Quebec is a huge part of what distinguishes Canada from the U.S.
I agree with your whole comment AJ. Building on this, as someone who lives in the US, one of the other keys to Canada being different is wholesale acceptance and encouragement of Quebec being an important and equal member to the ROC.


In the States, Quebec's equivalent, Louisiana, uses it's French identity as nothing more than a tourist hook, the butt of jokes and a corporate marketing exercise, and this is in a country where individual States have far, far more power than a Canadian province. The crush for homogeneity has reduced a long French heritage to an asterisk.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-22-2019, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,267 posts, read 27,728,169 times
Reputation: 8713
I'd also add that outside Canada (including right next door in the US) there is a lot of fluidity as to what the Frenchness of Quebec/Canada entails.


Often for people that are aware that French is largely concentrated in one region, they expect it's like a piece of France dropped into northeastern North America: with the architecture, food, dress, mannerisms, governance style, etc. that goes along with the stereotypes.


Obviously that's inaccurate.


On the other hand some other people think it's a bit of a folksy thing or a cool backdrop like a western movie set. Often people expect Quebec to be "French" like Louisiana is "French", or the SW US is "Spanish". Or maybe even like a historically Polish neighbourhood in Chicago is "Polish". Obviously this is inaccurate as well and the Frenchness of Quebec is much more pervasive and far-reaching than that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2019, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Québec
69 posts, read 17,061 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
I agree with your whole comment AJ. Building on this, as someone who lives in the US, one of the other keys to Canada being different is wholesale acceptance and encouragement of Quebec being an important and equal member to the ROC.


In the States, Quebec's equivalent, Louisiana, uses it's French identity as nothing more than a tourist hook, the butt of jokes and a corporate marketing exercise, and this is in a country where individual States have far, far more power than a Canadian province. The crush for homogeneity has reduced a long French heritage to an asterisk.
Quebec started Canada, has 1/4 of the population. And the #2 city or formerly #1 city. So this is only logical. Louisiana is on the periphery of the US and has small population.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2019, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,722 posts, read 11,225,194 times
Reputation: 10453
Quote:
Originally Posted by gailfo2 View Post
Quebec started Canada, has 1/4 of the population. And the #2 city or formerly #1 city. So this is only logical. Louisiana is on the periphery of the US and has small population.
New Orleans was the preeminent city in the South, had an influx of additional Nova Scotia French, and given the powers that each state individually holds, on can easily say they've done nothing with the opportunity and power that they were granted.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2019, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Québec
69 posts, read 17,061 times
Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
New Orleans was the preeminent city in the South, had an influx of additional Nova Scotia French, and given the powers that each state individually holds, on can easily say they've done nothing with the opportunity and power that they were granted.
That's fair. So are you saying does Quebec doing great with the power we have?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2019, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,722 posts, read 11,225,194 times
Reputation: 10453
Quote:
Originally Posted by gailfo2 View Post
That's fair. So are you saying does Quebec doing great with the power we have?
I would say yes. In a country that is heavily controlled by the Federal government, Quebec has essentially free reign to do/implement whatever policy exceptions it likes. For all intents and purposes they have the freedom of an independent region without having to pay the full costs of a social safety net.


I think a lot of the BS spewed from the mouth breathers that like to bash Quebec is jealousy and envy more than anything else.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2019, 05:20 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,894 posts, read 11,333,684 times
Reputation: 3908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Even though I live in Quebec and defend its uniqueness a lot, I only partly agree with this and believe fusion makes some good points.


What I would say is that for people abroad who know a bit about a Canada (or *think* they know a bit about Canada), yes Quebec does stand out as a very obvious defining characteristic. If they push into Canada a bit more, their view that Quebec really is what makes Canada different from the U.S. generally tends to get strengthened.


That said, probably for most people globally Canada has this vague "French" aspect it to it that may or may not be associated with the words "Quebec" and "Montreal". Though most certainly "French" and "Canada" are inseparable from the globally famous Canadian icons "Celine Dion" and "Cirque du Soleil".


But the broader French aspect of Canada for people is not usually accurately grasped, which is why people show up in Toronto and Vancouver expecting tons of French (though yes French is more visible in those two cities than it is in Seattle, Buffalo or Chicago). A lot of people expect it to be more evenly spread out across the country, as opposed to being fairly concentrated in one region.


Also, a lot of iconic Canadian stuff is not necessarily associated with Quebec (even if many of these things are present and even iconic to Quebec too): polar bears, vast wilderness, cold snowy winters, hockey, mountains, etc.


My guess is that poutine (making a name for itself worldwide) is more associated with "Canada" globally than it is with "Quebec", though perhaps people do pick up that the name sounds French in origin. But if you're in Kuala Lumpur there is a good chance the Canadian owner of the poutine place is an anglo from Toronto or Winnipeg. Hardly something that will impress upon Indonesians that Canada is "French" or "all about Quebec".


Just being realistic here. I actually do feel personally that fundamentally Quebec is a huge part of what distinguishes Canada from the U.S.
I was going to touch on some of what you said in your post. Specifically about my experiences travelling abroad to a few dozen countries. The typical response I get when I say i'm from Canada is

Oh very cold
Oh very nice peaceful place
Beautiful country
Canada is English and French - right!?
OH CANADA - Celine Dion
OH CANADA - Justin Bieber

Those are the most common - either that is Cold, peaceful and a beautiful place.

Depending on where you go some drill down further. In Sri Lanka for example, Canada and specifically Toronto was very well known for its heavy Tamil population - much to the chagrin of my Sinhalese guide who made it clear his displeasure. In Morocco, you would hear from a shopkeeper potentially how Canadian cities are like the U.S except for QC. Yes I got that from a Moroccan. In Havana they have you all figured out - Canadian from Toronto the auto-response is Toronto Blue Jays. Generally though, I don't find most people in most nations abroad - particularly outside the western world know too much about Canada. I think you got into that in some of your comments.

I find people also tend to find some sort of fault or criticize English Canada for being too much like the U.S.. As if this is some sort of weakness. Fact is however, for the last few hundred years - the English part of N.A grew together - shared histories and yes, even shared values though ofc there are marked differences. I think it is important for people to keep this in mind when looking at the Anglosphere of our hemisphere. We are similar to the U.S - not same but similar and that is OK.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2019, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,267 posts, read 27,728,169 times
Reputation: 8713
The attitude I have most often encountered regarding Anglo-Canada's uniqueness vs the US is "dismissive".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2019, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,894 posts, read 11,333,684 times
Reputation: 3908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
The attitude I have most often encountered regarding Anglo-Canada's uniqueness vs the US is "dismissive".
I don't think that is always fair. That said, Canada would do better for itself if it found more ways of marketing itself more penetratively. I really think it is a situation whereby people just don't know that much about the country.

It is also a matter of how much this is seen as an issue. Clearly it bothers some. Clearly some enjoy deriding the place over it, but is it inherently a big problem. I for one see the positive aspects of the country as clearly outweighing the fact that we aren't as powerful as our big brother downstairs or aren't as 'well known' as other nations.

In any event - I'm doing my part with my travels and meeting people around the world. I should charge the Canadian government for my services
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-22-2019, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
22,267 posts, read 27,728,169 times
Reputation: 8713
Yes it is unfair.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top