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View Poll Results: Is Quebec Independence a Legitimate Movement?
Yes 106 66.67%
No 53 33.33%
Voters: 159. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-22-2014, 03:03 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,276,102 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guytar1220 View Post
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
snip
Thanks for the answers.

I think the only question that is left in the air is the fate of the Atlantic Provinces.

The only other thing I could think of to ponder would be how would a quadrilateral Norad work since Mexico will most likely end up joining it in the future...but that's a question for another day.
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Old 12-22-2014, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
1,392 posts, read 1,276,102 times
Reputation: 936
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
The US is far more devolved that Canada. Some in good ways, others, not so much. I think there's a happy medium yet to be obtained that takes the best of both worlds.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I am not sure there is a consensus view on that.

Canadian provinces are almost entirely autonomous when it comes to education.

Many of our provinces have responsibilities for selecting international immigrants.

Our provinces are autonomous when it comes to highway transportation (signage, rules of the road, etc.)

We've also had a province declare French as its only official language against the wishes of the Canadian federal government. (At the time. The feds have since mellowed out on this issue.)
When it comes to law enforcement and criminal justice the states have far more say in America then the Provinces do in Canada. States pay at least 90% of all education costs and are the ones most responsible for education K-12 as well as higher education...I have no idea if it's similar in Canada or not in this regard. States have no authority whatsoever when it comes to immigration that comes from the federal government. Outside the interstates (which are run by the states with federal funding) the states are required to maintain highways and other infrastructure. So to answer this question I would say it depends on what you are referring to as far who has greater autonomy.
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Old 12-22-2014, 03:54 PM
 
Location: Alberta, Canada
2,172 posts, read 1,752,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
When it comes to law enforcement and criminal justice the states have far more say in America then the Provinces do in Canada. States pay at least 90% of all education costs and are the ones most responsible for education K-12 as well as higher education...I have no idea if it's similar in Canada or not in this regard. States have no authority whatsoever when it comes to immigration that comes from the federal government. Outside the interstates (which are run by the states with federal funding) the states are required to maintain highways and other infrastructure. So to answer this question I would say it depends on what you are referring to as far who has greater autonomy.
All of this is spelled out in Canada's constitution:

-- Criminal law, federal (s. 91(27)); with administration (e.g. courts) done by the province (s. 92(14)).
-- Education, provincial (s. 93).
-- Immigration--a toss-up. Provinces can select immigrants if they want (s. 95), but only Quebec has chosen to. The other provinces let the federal government look after immigration.
-- Highways, provincial (s. 92(10)).

In spite of the clear division of powers in the Constitution, there is a great deal of caselaw further delineating the division. Most of this is due to technological advancements that did not exist at the time of the drafting of the constitution ("Who has jurisdiction over air travel?"); but sometimes, it helps define the stated division further ("Is a highway a 'local work and undertaking' for the purposes of s. 92(10)?").
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Old 12-22-2014, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,688 posts, read 8,753,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
You forget where I'm from, don't you? Or maybe you just don't know...
It wasn't just for you... I do know you've lived a few places...but where did you grow up again??
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Old 12-22-2014, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Shawinigan
144 posts, read 100,172 times
Reputation: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChevySpoons View Post
All of this is spelled out in Canada's constitution:

-- Criminal law, federal (s. 91(27)); with administration (e.g. courts) done by the province (s. 92(14)).
-- Education, provincial (s. 93).
-- Immigration--a toss-up. Provinces can select immigrants if they want (s. 95), but only Quebec has chosen to. The other provinces let the federal government look after immigration.
-- Highways, provincial (s. 92(10)).

In spite of the clear division of powers in the Constitution, there is a great deal of caselaw further delineating the division. Most of this is due to technological advancements that did not exist at the time of the drafting of the constitution ("Who has jurisdiction over air travel?"); but sometimes, it helps define the stated division further ("Is a highway a 'local work and undertaking' for the purposes of s. 92(10)?").
Thanks for the precisons,

If I'm not mistaking, any provincial jurisdictions can be overwriten by the parent constitution, if the country believes it is in everyones interest. I'm not aware of any instances of this happening particularity, not sure if it was even used in October 70 incident?
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Old 12-22-2014, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Shawinigan
144 posts, read 100,172 times
Reputation: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeyyc View Post
The US is far more devolved that Canada. Some in good ways, others, not so much. I think there's a happy medium yet to be obtained that takes the best of both worlds.
And I guess that it is probably the tricky part to achieve...give enough power for provinces/states to be autonomous while having strong alliances on collective matters
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Old 12-22-2014, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Shawinigan
144 posts, read 100,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
despite all of this, a whopping 45% voted against confederation.
Only 42 counties voted out of 65...results 47 conservatives and 17 for the reds...abstention was more than obvious!

One thing I didn't know officially: "1867 constitution would guarantees to the Church all his acquired rights and confirms its dominance over the French-Canadian society" so religion was the supreme political power, we knew that, but agreed in the constitution, wow! this was a real "a religious state". No wonder quebecers are sensitive about collectives rights!

When the last PQ gov came up with a charter of value that would prevent "ostentatious" religious signs for public workers, it was received quite well by the franco-laics, but as unacceptable, narrow-mimded, xeno and racist by the ROC, anglo-quebecers and religous, who believe in a severe charter of rights attack.... the importance to know history!

Thank's god I am not believer!
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Old 12-23-2014, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Hougary, Texberta
8,593 posts, read 11,077,046 times
Reputation: 10306
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwa1984 View Post
When it comes to law enforcement and criminal justice the states have far more say in America then the Provinces do in Canada. States pay at least 90% of all education costs and are the ones most responsible for education K-12 as well as higher education...I have no idea if it's similar in Canada or not in this regard. States have no authority whatsoever when it comes to immigration that comes from the federal government. Outside the interstates (which are run by the states with federal funding) the states are required to maintain highways and other infrastructure. So to answer this question I would say it depends on what you are referring to as far who has greater autonomy.
It's ok. Acajack just has to be contrary to anything I say.

Watch; Black.
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Old 12-23-2014, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,348,673 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Guytar1220 View Post
Thanks for the precisons,

If I'm not mistaking, any provincial jurisdictions can be overwriten by the parent constitution, if the country believes it is in everyones interest. I'm not aware of any instances of this happening particularity, not sure if it was even used in October 70 incident?
During the October 1970 crisis, the War Measures Act was invoked by Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau with the agreement of both the Premier of Quebec (Robert Bourassa) and the Mayor of Montreal (Jean Drapeau).
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Old 12-23-2014, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,348,673 times
Reputation: 8603
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
It wasn't just for you... I do know you've lived a few places...but where did you grow up again??
My family's roots go back over 400 years in Atlantic Canada. I grew up in the three Maritime provinces and also in Ontario. I've only lived in Quebec as an adult.

I've actually spent a good part of my career working in culture and advocacy for francophone minority groups across Canada, and was even on one of the original organizing committees for that event you linked to.
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