U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-02-2017, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,597 posts, read 25,654,327 times
Reputation: 8109

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
I think Montreal is an exception to that. It has slightly over 4M people, so roughly the size of Seattle, but has a very urban vibe, and is lively all throughout. Aside from the West Island, there is no suburban vibe on the island whatsoever. Despite its mediocre economy, I will give it props where it's due. The liveliness is unmatched in pretty much all of NA aside from maybe Las Vegas and parts of New York.
In addition, have you seen the LOADS of public squares scattered throughout? Each is unique, and most feature some pretty nice sculptures.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catego...es_in_Montreal
Its economy can't really be said to be mediocre anymore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-02-2017, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Seminole County, FL
7,776 posts, read 5,342,012 times
Reputation: 9408
Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Its economy can't really be said to be mediocre anymore.
I've been out of the Montreal economic loop for a while... Has it really improved that much? Compared to other Canadian and North American cities?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2017, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
11,384 posts, read 7,843,684 times
Reputation: 6452
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
I agree, however western Europe and North American cities are VASTLY different in terms of energy. We should not talk as if they are similar.

A typical North America city with 2 million people on paper usually look largely suburban and very quiet most of the time. You keep wondering this question: where the hell are the people? For example, Seattle with almost 4 million metro population, looks so boring with a half dead downtown. Vancouver with 2.3 million people feels like a little seaside port town, with a minuscule downtown area. On the other hand, a European city with slightly over 1 million people will be busting with hundreds of pedestrians, small shops, street vendors most the time. A European city with 2 million people would feel like a massive metropolis with dozens of beautiful and vibrant commercial streets and boulevards, very dense and urban city centre as well as frequent and convenient public transportation.

In reality, a city like Toronto can hardly beat a European city with 1.5-2m people in terms of urban feel and the "energy". Palermo's (again, a city less than a quarter of Toronto's size) retail streets would make Yonge, Queen and Bloor in Toronto feel like a small town.

Yes, Canadian cities are "CLEAN" because people don't go to the city (not that no one does, but in terms of numbers, it is so small). A place is of course clean when people don't interact as much with it. You just keep wondering where the hell are those 2M or 6M residents all the time, cutting grass?

Additionally, Canadian cities are CLEAN, yet there is little beauty. I am not talking about the sea or the mountain which are not man made. I am talking about public squares, sculptures, fountains, beautiful architecture, urban gardens (not a huge park with just rocks and grass). I mean, where is the money spent so that a city with millions of people can't even have ONE nice fountain and ONE great public square? A European city with 300,000 people would have a far more impressive and attractive square than Nathan Philips square or Dundas Square in Toronto (which are just FUGLY).

Yes, Canadian cities are CLEAN. So is Ulan Bator or the North Pole.
Stay off the cheap wine Botti.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2017, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
20,597 posts, read 25,654,327 times
Reputation: 8109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arcenal352 View Post
I've been out of the Montreal economic loop for a while... Has it really improved that much? Compared to other Canadian and North American cities?
Yes, both it and Quebec have rebounded considerably. Montreal's unemployment rate is as low or lower than that of several major Canadian cities now. It's lower than Toronto's, for example.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2017, 12:31 PM
 
1,800 posts, read 1,752,646 times
Reputation: 1641
Quote:
Originally Posted by OZpharmer View Post
Does that generally mean American cities are more vibrant/active than Canadian cities then? (comparing cities with similar size or population)
I you consider hoods to be 'vibrant and active' then I would certainly think so. I can see the appeal for some of having sellers working 24/7 in alleys and street corners selling their merchandise.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario
1,455 posts, read 1,210,919 times
Reputation: 1621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Stay off the cheap wine Botti.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 07:09 AM
 
Location: Lakeland, Florida
6,682 posts, read 11,905,704 times
Reputation: 7904
Quote:
Originally Posted by daynet View Post
I haven't been to any city in the US save for Boston, years ago, but one must keep in mind the areas of the city one is in. A couple of friends and I drove to Boston to shop (I know...they liked shopping, I don't, but I wanted to visit the city).

We were in the shopping area of Boston, the main drag, whatever it was. It's so long ago that I don't remember. Of course, that area is going to be clean!

Same as any city's main drag, shopping venue will be. I'm sure that there are areas of Boston that are less than tidy, same as there are in areas of Montreal.

That shopping area in Boston was probably Newberry Street. Yes it is kept clean as it's a haven for shoppers with money. Alot of tourist dollars, are spent on that Street of shops and restaurants. Believe me Boston has a number of rundown areas. It's a very old city.


Overall though I think Canada does seem cleaner than the US.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 04:54 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,444,139 times
Reputation: 3716
Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
I agree, however western Europe and North American cities are VASTLY different in terms of energy. We should not talk as if they are similar.

A typical North America city with 2 million people on paper usually look largely suburban and very quiet most of the time. You keep wondering this question: where the hell are the people? For example, Seattle with almost 4 million metro population, looks so boring with a half dead downtown. Vancouver with 2.3 million people feels like a little seaside port town, with a minuscule downtown area. On the other hand, a European city with slightly over 1 million people will be busting with hundreds of pedestrians, small shops, street vendors most the time. A European city with 2 million people would feel like a massive metropolis with dozens of beautiful and vibrant commercial streets and boulevards, very dense and urban city centre as well as frequent and convenient public transportation.

In reality, a city like Toronto can hardly beat a European city with 1.5-2m people in terms of urban feel and the "energy". Palermo's (again, a city less than a quarter of Toronto's size) retail streets would make Yonge, Queen and Bloor in Toronto feel like a small town.

Yes, Canadian cities are "CLEAN" because people don't go to the city (not that no one does, but in terms of numbers, it is so small). A place is of course clean when people don't interact as much with it. You just keep wondering where the hell are those 2M or 6M residents all the time, cutting grass?

Additionally, Canadian cities are CLEAN, yet there is little beauty. I am not talking about the sea or the mountain which are not man made. I am talking about public squares, sculptures, fountains, beautiful architecture, urban gardens (not a huge park with just rocks and grass). I mean, where is the money spent so that a city with millions of people can't even have ONE nice fountain and ONE great public square? A European city with 300,000 people would have a far more impressive and attractive square than Nathan Philips square or Dundas Square in Toronto (which are just FUGLY).

Yes, Canadian cities are CLEAN. So is Ulan Bator or the North Pole.
Yonge/Dundas Square is far from dead and you know it! It might be a bit tacky but its practically always busy and I actually find the area pretty visually stimulating - lights/billboards/buildings and most importantly events/people. There is almost always an event or concert going on (festival/parade in summer) and the diversity of different people in one place is tough to beat almost anywhere. A square is a gathering place for people, it doesn't have to be a 500 year old work of art to do its job and Yonge/Dundas like it or lump it - does its job of attracting people to it as a focal point in the DT core! You are embellishing things because you prefer European architecture and Europe in general. I personally don't think it would work to have a square where Yonge/Dundas is that is designed with inspiration from an old Euro city. That would be totally FAKE because Toronto is too new and modern for that - particularly this part of Toronto. Maybe an older style square near the Distillery or U of T/Annex and some of the older parts of Old Toronto would work - fountains and sculptures and all but not at Dundas and Yonge lol - talk about completely out of place and delusional.

I do agree with you that European cities (Add to it S.A/African/Asian to boot) generally have more energy than Canadian or American cities but talk about going over the top with this post! As Nat said, lay off the cheap 2 euro wine you are getting at Carrefour!

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Yonge st vibrant, that's just funny.
Nonsense again - Yonge street IS vibrant by almost any measure. Its not as beautiful as Istiklal street or La Ramblas or the Gran Via obviously and it certainly doesn't have the ped crush of many of the worlds megacities' major arterials, but busy and vibrant with pedestrian crush - sure is and yes I've been around!.. Yet again just some silly cheap shots to entertain your preference for Europe and more specifically its architecture and also to get a rise out of people. I can buy the whole Europe has better architecture argument but to argue Yonge street isn't vibrant is totally disingenuous and underscores that you seemingly have a bone to pick!

Last edited by fusion2; 03-04-2017 at 05:52 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,444,139 times
Reputation: 3716
This is 'dead' Yonge/Dundas Square that Botti is getting his panties all in a knot over..

Excuse the dumb music in the video but its far from being the ugliest or dead of places in the world imo anyway.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=udBDxXLCc8o

An old euro style square simply wouldn't work in this area!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2017, 06:29 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 10,444,139 times
Reputation: 3716
Oh yeah one more thing Botti since you 'triggered' this lol

NFP - Nathan Phillips Square was designed by a European - OMG I know but it is true. Finnish architect Viljo Revell was behind the space you loath lol.. He designed NFP and also the 'New' Toronto City Hall back in the 60's. Just sayin...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viljo_Revell

You're welcome!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Canada
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top