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Old 01-04-2015, 02:02 PM
 
Location: europe
77 posts, read 77,192 times
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I have toyed with the idea of retiring in Quebec for a while. How difficult is this? I am in no rush because I will be retiring in the upcoming decade but also I will move sooner if there is this opportunity. I speak French as well or better than English and my finances are in good order. My question is if I can just move there and live, without pursuing citizenship. As it stands I have only the ability to stay for six months each time I visit. I am thankful for any tips you may offer.
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Old 01-04-2015, 02:08 PM
 
1,701 posts, read 1,995,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtmann View Post
I have toyed with the idea of retiring in Quebec for a while. How difficult is this? I am in no rush because I will be retiring in the upcoming decade but also I will move sooner if there is this opportunity. I speak French as well or better than English and my finances are in good order. My question is if I can just move there and live, without pursuing citizenship. As it stands I have only the ability to stay for six months each time I visit. I am thankful for any tips you may offer.
Depends on the country. Which country are you from?
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Old 01-04-2015, 02:11 PM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,278,774 times
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Do keep in mind, as you head towards retirement, that medical and social services in Quebec are absolutely abysmal. Even private care sucks.

To answer your question, it should not be too much of an issue.
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Old 01-04-2015, 02:12 PM
 
Location: europe
77 posts, read 77,192 times
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Originally Posted by sandman249 View Post
Depends on the country. Which country are you from?
Thank you for your response, Sandman. I will be moving to Quebec from the Netherlands.
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Old 01-04-2015, 02:13 PM
 
Location: europe
77 posts, read 77,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliss2 View Post
Do keep in mind, as you head towards retirement, that medical and social services in Quebec are absolutely abysmal. Even private care sucks.

To answer your question, it should not be too much of an issue.
Really? Is it worse than in other provinces of Canada?
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Old 01-04-2015, 02:23 PM
 
1,701 posts, read 1,995,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtmann View Post
Thank you for your response, Sandman. I will be moving to Quebec from the Netherlands.
Check the website to see if you meet the criteria for skilled immigration for Quebec. If you do ... it will take about 2 years to immigrate to Canada.

Processing times for Quebec skilled worker applications
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Old 01-04-2015, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,691 posts, read 8,756,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtmann View Post
I have toyed with the idea of retiring in Quebec for a while. How difficult is this? I am in no rush because I will be retiring in the upcoming decade but also I will move sooner if there is this opportunity. I speak French as well or better than English and my finances are in good order. My question is if I can just move there and live, without pursuing citizenship. As it stands I have only the ability to stay for six months each time I visit. I am thankful for any tips you may offer.
Greetings Drro or whatever other moniker you are using today.
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Old 01-04-2015, 04:36 PM
 
3,072 posts, read 4,278,774 times
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Originally Posted by dtmann View Post
Really? Is it worse than in other provinces of Canada?
Not all, but it is certainly much worse than Alberta and British Columbia. I have not lived in the others. Lots of old Quebecois are okay with it, but many don't know different. It will be worse than you are used too, but it isn't 3rd world either. Just be mindful
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Old 01-04-2015, 05:24 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ♥ 🍁 ♥
7,247 posts, read 6,585,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dtmann View Post
I have toyed with the idea of retiring in Quebec for a while. How difficult is this? I am in no rush because I will be retiring in the upcoming decade but also I will move sooner if there is this opportunity. I speak French as well or better than English and my finances are in good order. My question is if I can just move there and live, without pursuing citizenship. As it stands I have only the ability to stay for six months each time I visit. I am thankful for any tips you may offer.
Nope. It doesn't work that way. If you're of retirement age and won't be employed or creating a business and employment for Canadian citizens nor otherwise heavily investing financially in the country then all you can do is come as a visitor and visit in the country for 6 months out of a year. You won't qualify to apply for permanent residency or to apply for citizenship, and you won't qualify for any Canadian social benefits (such as medical care coverage for example) during your 6 month visits. You will be required to demonstrate that you are independent and fully capable of financially supporting all of your expenses while visiting in the country.

You might be able to stay for a longer period of time if you become a student at a Canadian university, or if you were to come in to work on a temporary work visa that was for longer than 6 months. But even then the fact that you are of retirement age counts against you and would still disqualify you from being eligible for permanent residency or citizenship. Once you were finished with your courses at university or upon expiry of your temporary work on the work visa, you would have to return home.

It's a good question you asked because there are lots of other people that entertain the idea of retiring to Canada in the hopes of taking advantage of the health care benefits and other social benefits in their old age. And it just doesn't work that way, otherwise it would be a huge burden on Canadian society if that kind of thing was allowed.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 01-04-2015 at 05:35 PM..
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Old 01-04-2015, 07:23 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,947 posts, read 27,354,178 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandman249 View Post
Depends on the country. Which country are you from?
I don't believe your country of origin has any bearing at all on whether you will get accepted as an immigrant to Quebec or anywhere else in Canada.
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